» » The People of the Abyss by Jack London, Nonfiction, Social Issues, Homelessness & Poverty

Download The People of the Abyss by Jack London, Nonfiction, Social Issues, Homelessness & Poverty fb2

by Jack London

Download The People of the Abyss by Jack London, Nonfiction, Social Issues, Homelessness & Poverty fb2
Author: Jack London
ISBN: 1598189735
Language: English
Pages: 208 pages
Category: Social Issues
Publisher: Aegypan (September 1, 2006)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: azw rtf mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1494 kb | EPUB size: 1625 kb | DJVU size: 1313 kb

eText Explorer™ was used to transform this Project Gutenberg™ eText into a format that imports cleanly into eBook reading devices. We encourage you to keep this file on your own disk, keeping an electronic path open for the next readers.

London’s book was published in 1903, and thankfully the plight of the .

London’s book was published in 1903, and thankfully the plight of the English underclasses has been much improved over the past century with the implementation of a minimum wage, a national health plan and public assistance. Families were forced into poverty and sometimes starvation when the husband, the main breadwinner, was injured, became ill or died. The majority of bankruptcies in our own time are caused by overwhelming medical bills. As a little background, Jack London (the same one who wrote White Fang and many I find myself amazed and honestly a little depressed that a book published in 1903 about the poor of London can seem so relevant today.

Plenty of people were too slow to pick hops and made a failure of it. A man, to succeed, must use his head and be quick with his fingers . A man, to succeed, must use his head and be quick with his fingers, must be exceeding quick with his fingers. Now he and his old woman could do very well at it, working the one bin between them and not going to sleep over it; but then, they had been at it for years. At least workmen and their families existed in some sort of fashion in the houses across from us. And each day and every day, from one in the afternoon till six, our ragged spike line is the principal feature of the view commanded by their front doors and windows.

In 1902, Jack London, posing as an out-of-work sailor, went underground into the belly of the beast: the slums of London's East End. With passion and vision, he used his skill as a journalist to expose the horrors of the Abyss to the world. Because of his ability to blend in with working people and put them at their ease, because he donned their clothing, and spent nights on the street -working odd jobs, sleeping in the homeless shelters-he gained an insight into the slum life which remains unique.

The People of the Abyss (1903) is a book by Jack London about life in the East End of London in 1902. In his attempt to understand the working-class of this deprived area of London the author stayed as a lodger with a poor family

Homeless people, and homeless organizations, are sometimes accused or convicted of fraudulent behavior

Homeless people, and homeless organizations, are sometimes accused or convicted of fraudulent behavior. Criminals are also known to exploit homeless people, ranging from identity theft to tax and welfare scams  . How the Other Half Lives and Jack London's The People of the Abyss (1903) discussed homelessness, and raised public awareness, which caused some changes in building codes and some social conditions. In England, dormitory housing called "spikes" was provided by local boroughs. By the 1930s in England, there were 30,000 people living in these facilities.

Jack London's Non-Fiction -. John Barleycorn. Following the summer in question came a hard winter. Great numbers of the unemployed formed into processions, as many as a dozen at a time, and daily marched through the streets of London crying for bread

Jack London's Non-Fiction -. The People of the Abyss. Revolution and Other Essays. Great numbers of the unemployed formed into processions, as many as a dozen at a time, and daily marched through the streets of London crying for bread. Mr. Justin McCarthy, writing in the month of January 1903, to the New York Independent, briefly epitomises the situation as follows:- The workhouses have no space left in which to pack the starving crowds who are craving every day and night at their doors for food and shelter.

How the Other Half Lives and Jack London's The People of the Abyss (1903) discussed homelessness, and raised public awareness, which caused some changes in building codes and some social conditions. In 1933, George Orwell wrote about poverty in London and Paris, in his book Down and Out in Paris and London

More books by Jack London. Jack London voluntarily put himself in this situation to learn what life was like for the wretched

More books by Jack London. Jack London voluntarily put himself in this situation to learn what life was like for the wretched. Luckily for him, he had a refuge when things got too tough (and they often did) but none of the others he came into contact with, had such an escape. Perhaps those who were more elevated on the social ladder were unaware of those below but that seems unlikely given the 450,000 or so who lived in such conditions. This book speaks volumes of how little we have progressed as a species. I believe that this is one of the best books that I have ever read. Upvote (0). Downvote (0). 01/22/2014.

This is a non fiction book where Jack London Lives with the homeless people of London. One of the pioneers of 20th century American literature, Jack London specialized in tales of adventure inspired by his own experiences. London was born in San Francisco in 1876. And some life to the old saying about "walking a mile in another man's shoes. Muita painoksia - Näytä kaikki. At 14, he quit school and became an "oyster pirate," robbing oyster beds to sell his booty to the bars and restaurants in Oakland. Later, he turned on his pirate associates and joined the local Fish Patrol, resulting in some hair-raising waterfront battles.

From the author's preface: "The experiences related in this volume fell to me in the summer of 1902. I went down into the underworld of London with an attitude of mind which I may best liken to that of the explorer. I was open to be convinced by the evidence of my eyes, rather than by the teachings of those who had not seen, or by the words of those who had seen and gone before. Further, I took with me certain simple criteria with which to measure the life of the underworld. That which made for more life, for physical and spiritual health, was good; that which made for less life, which hurt, and dwarfed, and distorted life, was bad."

Comments (7)
Xwnaydan
Don't go into this one unless you are prepared for intensely depressing scenarios. While this is not one of Jack London's most exciting books, it is most certainly effective. A description of the author's first-hand descent into early 20th century London's East End, it takes off where Dickens left nearly a century earlier. But this is not fiction. No one says "Please sir, may I have some more?" The poor of the East End rarely have anything at all to eat, nowhere to sleep, and nothing at all to look forward to. Hundreds of thousands barely exist in this nether world of starvation, disease, crime and depravity. And it is all real, described first-hand by the intrepid Jack London, as he lives the life of an East-Ender.

It would be unbelievable as fiction; as fact it is clear how socialism struck such a strong chord with this passionate, expressive writer.
Not-the-Same
I can not recommend this book highly enough. Too often, we hear only about middle and upper class Edwardian England. Jack London took his daring spirit, his critical eye and his talents as a journalist into London's East End to see the misery, poverty, disease and backbreaking labor that made so much wealth for so few British men and women. Read about how much money a poor laborer might spend to rent the space under a bed (yes, under a bed) in an East End slum so that he would have a place to sleep at night. Learn about how a single moment's inattention brought about by hunger and lack of sleep and an injury on the job could mean the end of labor---and the inevitable spiral into poverty, starvation and death. I have recommended this book to several friends who have also found it eye opening.
This is the reason that Kindle is so useful,. A book like this might go years between publications. But, with electronic publication, it is always available. There will always be more people who want to read about life and death adventures in Alaska than about life and death adventures in capitalist England at the turn of the 19th century---but the latter topic is important, too.
Mmsa
My present political position in life is one that has evolved through time. I was a young Republican in my early adult life and then began to observe how our first-world society works and more importantly, read about how it used to be. Books such as The Jungle, Sister Carry, and Martin Eden defined for me the societal conditions that existed when the free market was allowed to shape society under near laissez-faire conditions. By looking at life as it is depicted in these books I was able to develop comparisons between then and now, and consider the reasons for the vast contrasts that have developed over the past hundred years.

The People of the Abyss is unique within this historical perspective in that it pushes the laissez-faire extreme closer to the ideal. Jack London tells of life in London where the vast majority of people, men, women, and children, are treated as a cheap commodity; used for the lowest wages possible and then discarded when their labor can be replaced for a more vigorous person or for even lower wages. The commodity is housed in pits that are filled to maximum capacity in order to maximize rents and is fed with food intended to sustain life while bleeding away the strength of youth.

The book is an observational commentary composed by London during his sojourns into the East End of London. He dressed as these people dressed, pursued work as they did, and most importantly, recognized these people as human. London once said that this was his most purposeful book, indicating, “No other book of mine took so much of my young heart and tears as that study of the economic degradation of the poor." After reading The People of the Abyss, I easily find an appreciation for London’s work and certainly see its value in my modern observations of today’s society.
Lucam
A chilling example of well written first person social reportage that documents the conditions in the East End of London in 1902. The details have changed, but the book is still timely due to the resurgence of vast economic inequality in many societies that have the resources but not the political interest in social justice. A depressing but very worthwhile read. It reminds us that for most citizens, their place in a civil society is fragile and perilous.