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by Judy Blume

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Author: Judy Blume
ISBN: 0330398091
Language: English
Pages: 110 pages
Publisher: PAN BOOKS LTD (ENGLAND); Unabridged edition (1998)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: lit lrf mbr azw
FB2 size: 1228 kb | EPUB size: 1748 kb | DJVU size: 1507 kb

The second book in my project to read or re-read all the Judy Blume

Iggie's house just wasn't the same. Iggie was gone, moved to Tokyo. The second book in my project to read or re-read all the Judy Blume. Because it's narrated by a little while girl, the focus is obviously on her as she tries to befriend a black family (the first and only in her neighborhood).

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.

Margaret Simon, almost twelve, has just moved from New York City to the suburbs, and she’s anxious to fit in with her new friends. When she’s asked to join a secret club she jumps at the chance. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, Look for special features inside. In the summer of 1977, Victoria Leonard’s world changes forever when Caitlin Somers chooses her as a friend.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. When it comes to friendship, who cares about skin color? This classic middle grade novel from Judy Blume carries an important message-with a fresh new look. Iggie’s House just wasn’t the same.

Iggie's House is a 1970 young adult novel by Judy Blume. The story concerns Winnie, whose best friend Iggie has moved away. The new family moving into Iggie's house are the first black people in the neighborhood

Iggie's House is a 1970 young adult novel by Judy Blume. The new family moving into Iggie's house are the first black people in the neighborhood. While Winnie is quick to make friends with the new kids, she realizes that some people, possibly including her own parents, have trouble seeing past a person's color.

Iggie's House is a moving novel that tackles racism and neighbourhood prejudice, from celebrated children's author, Judy Blume

Iggie's House is a moving novel that tackles racism and neighbourhood prejudice, from celebrated children's author, Judy Blume. Winnie's best friend, Iggie, has just moved away – and Winnie's bored out of her mind without her. So she's determined to be friends with the new family, the Garbers, who've moved into Winnie's old house – especially Glenn, who's kind of cute. But certain people don't want the Garbers to be there, and have started a petition to get rid of them. You see Glenn and his family are black, and Grove Street is stuck in the past.

All rights reserved But Iggie’s family, now that was a different story. At Iggie’s house she hadn’t been treated as a child.

But Iggie’s family, now that was a different story. And she’d spent plenty of time there, too. She had slept over practically every Saturday night for two years.

Infobox Writer name Judy Blume. Blume's novels for elementary schoolers were among the first to tackle such controversial matters as racism ("Iggie's House"), menstruation ("Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret"), divorce ("It's Not the End of the World"), bullying ("Blubber"), masturbation ("Deenie"; "Then Again, Maybe I Won't") and teenage sexuality ("Forever").

Racial tensions were high, especially after the assassination in 1968 of Martin Luther King, Jr. The ongoing fight for racial equality affected all of us one way or another.

Iggie's house just wasn't the same. Iggie was gone, moved to Tokyo Twenty-two books, all of them still in print, followed. And there was Winnie, cracking her gum on Grove Street, where she'd always lived, with no more best friend and two weeks left of summer. Then the Garber family moved into Iggie's house - two boys, Glenn and Herbie, and Tina, their little sister. The Garbers were black and Grove Street was white and always had been. Twenty-two books, all of them still in print, followed. Millions of readers all over the world rely on Judy Blume books to portray the difficulties and joys of growing up with honesty and humor. Judy says, "While the way we live may have changed, what's deep inside us hasn't.

When Grove Street gets its first black family, Winnie is a welcoming party of one.

"The purpose is worthy, and the most perceptive aspect of the book is the interpretation of the reaction of the black family."-- "Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books."

Comments (7)
Kale
For a child's book, the subject matter was handled rather non-complicated and explains the social disorder of that time in the 60s well. I recommend this book for adults as well as reading it with a younger child.
Faell
This is Judy Blume's first long book and I gotta say, I was very pleased with how much I enjoyed it. Although her books are a little outdated these days, I still felt this book connected to today's society. I don't have anything bad to say about the book itself and I do think if kids read this book, then it could teach about what goes on in even today's society. Very interesting story!
Yainai
Arrived in great condition, exactly as described.
Still In Mind
I love Judy Blume. A great book about racism.
Wohald
Read with my son for school. Great read for 3rd graders.
My son enjoyed it very much for his school book club.
Miromice
Finding books that my daughter likes to read is a chore. Judy Blume usually delivers though, and this time was no different.
My daughter was glued to this book until she was finished with it. Another winner from Blume.
Arthunter
I love this honest look into the past that is just as true today. I just wish it took place over longer than a week.
This book tells you you should NOT hate someone without getting to know them first especially if you hate them just because of their skin color in this story Winnie stands up to Mrs London to keep the Gabars from moving will it work or will Winnie's family having to leave with the gabars