» » A Year amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the life, character, and thought of the people of Persia, received during twelve months' residence in that country in the years 1887-8

Download A Year amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the life, character, and thought of the people of Persia, received during twelve months' residence in that country in the years 1887-8 fb2

by Edward Granville Browne

Download A Year amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the life, character, and thought of the people of Persia, received during twelve months' residence in that country in the years 1887-8 fb2
Author: Edward Granville Browne
ISBN: 1402193777
Language: English
Pages: 610 pages
Category: Middle East
Publisher: Adamant Media Corporation (November 28, 2001)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: azw doc rtf mbr
FB2 size: 1857 kb | EPUB size: 1418 kb | DJVU size: 1118 kb
Sub: Traveling

The Internet Archive is a bargain, but we need your help. If you find our site useful, we ask you humbly, please chip in. Help us reach our goal today!

His love for Persia and Persians is evident and he was well loved by Persians in return.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. His love for Persia and Persians is evident and he was well loved by Persians in return. I found the travelogue extremely interesting from several standpoints: one of which was to compare the Persia of his day to Iran of this century and what customs have remained in tact like hospitality towards guests and travellers and what has changed.

A Year amongst the Persians book. A Year amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the life, character, and thought of the people of Persia, received during twelve months' residence in that country in the years 1887-8.

Edward Granville Browne (1926). A Year Amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the Life, Character, & Thought of the People of Persia, Received During Twelve Months' Residence in that Country in the Years 1887-1888.

A year amongst the persians. Impressions as to the life, character, & thought of the people of persia. Received during Twelve Months' Residence in that Country in the Year 1887-1888. by. Edward granville browne. With A Memoir by SIR E. DENISON ROSS. Cambridge at the university press MCMXXVII. Frontispiece: EDWARD G. BROWNE (in Persian dress).

Edward Granville Browne.

A Year amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the Life, Character, and Thought of the People of Persia Received during Twelve Months' Residence in that Country in the Years 1887-1888 (Paperback). Edward Granville Browne (author). During Twelve Months' Residence in that Country in the Years 1887-1888.

A Year Amongst the Persians: Impressions as to the Life, Character, & Thought of the People of Persia, Received During Twelve Months' Residence in that Country in the Years 1887-1888.

By Edward Granville Browne. A year amongst the Persians. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Misc 4 from Lang Thompson. Persia from Katharine Hadow.

during twelve months Residence in that country in the years 1887–8. By Edward G. Browne . London: Adam and Charles Black, 1893.

Impressions as to the Life, Character, and Thought of the People of Persia, received during twelve months Residence in that country in the years 1887–8. Khudádád Khán of Ka'lat-i-Násirí was arraigned and, it is believed, deposed by the British Indian Government for acts of barbarous cruelty some months ago. Recommend this journal. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society.

This Elibron Classics book is a facsimile reprint of a 1893 edition by Adam and Charles Black, London.
Comments (7)
Dreladred
I was amazed to discover Edward G Browne. Somehow I had never run across him before and I am very greatful to Elibron Classics for reprinting his memoires. He was a renegade who wanted to join the Ottoman army originally as a young man and learned Turkish fluently. He insisted on learning Persian at a time when the British were almost universally despised in Iran for inequitably exploiting the oil and at a time when serving in the British diplomatic corp in India was thought to be of much greater prestige. Edward G Browne reached a level of understanding of Persian culture and traditions that few foreigners especially in his day ever did. His love for Persia and Persians is evident and he was well loved by Persians in return. I found the travelogue extremely interesting from several standpoints: one of which was to compare the Persia of his day to Iran of this century and what customs have remained in tact like hospitality towards guests and travellers and what has changed. He was deeply familiar and appreciative of the generosity of Persian friendship and honor. The other subject I found of great interest was his discriptions of how people travelled in those days, how caravans were procured and organized and provisioned for and what the caravanserais and inns were like. He is masterful at describing the different personalities of his Persian friends, hosts and hired hands. It is a truely fascinating and loving account which I highly recommend to anyone interested in Persian history and culture and I think many Iranian readers would find it extremely interesting as well. It was particularly magical to hear him describing places that I had been to in Tehran and other towns and villages in Iran, landmarks and mosques and catching the nuances of what had changed or hadn't. All in all he presents Persians in a very positive and unprejudiced light which is refreshing to know that someone in 1878 dared to be different. I am reminded of the great explorer and polyglot Richard Burton who also went native, became a Sufi and was possibly the first non Moslem European to go to Mecca disguised as a Persian. Edward G Browne's book is a refreshing departure from the propoganda and anti Iranian and anti Islamic diet we are fed by Western media.
Geny
The printing quality (looks like xerox) is very poor which makes it difficult to read. Rather than that the book is interesting for whoever is planning a vist to Persia/Iran.
Maximilianishe
The print was extremely faint and hard to read. Whatever technique they used to reproduce the text did not work.
Conjulhala
The copy is very bad. I can't even read it.
Reighbyra
One thing that strikes the reader is the oddly archaic diction, not so much of Browne's narrative itself, but of his recreations/translations into English of conversations held in Persian--there's that Orientalizing quasi-Biblical cadence that one finds in older translations of Eastern religious and literary texts that now seems somewhat ridiculous, if you don't anesthetize your internal kitsch/camp detector beforehand. I suspect some of this must be a more or less accurate reflection of ancient traditions of Persian floweriness of speech that were inseparable from norms of politeness and hospitality, but I wonder if some of it is just a matter of Persia, back then, somehow just _having_ to be represented in this tone. Since it's become plain "Iran," this necessity has disappeared.

The book starts pleasantly enough--Browne establishes a likable and trust-inspiring persona early on--but its first half is a not extremely memorable travel log of his slow muletrip through the country. In the second half, though, it becomes something else and something more, as Browne stays put for longer periods of time and is able to draw portraits of recurring characters and communities.

I had assumed that, given his predisposition, admitted early on, in favor of Turkish and Persian culture (his boyhood experience with the traditional pedagogy for acquiring ancient Greek was traumatic, it seems) Browne also had some especial sympathy for Islam. This, it turns out, is quite wide of the mark: what appeals to him about Persia is the classical poetry of Hafiz, Saadi, and Omar Khayyám and the traditions they and their like left behind, ranging from hedonistic materialism to undogmatic mysticism. In the mainstream Shi'ism of the Persian present he has little interest, finding it conducive to fanaticism and cruel intolerance.

The best, most personal parts of his narrative are towards the end, where, having finally established trusting relationships with oppressed (and hence very secretive) religious minorities, he probes sympathetically for an understanding of their histories and beliefs. We come to know and like representative freethinkers, Zoroastrians, and especially Babis and Bahais--indeed, Browne's working out the story of the persecutions, martyrdoms and subsequent intra-faith doctrinal squabbles of this religion is probably the center of gravity of his book. It never turns into dry exposition, however: as he pries into this variety of beliefs he is simultaneously falling into an opium addiction that, it turns out, he shares with many or most of those whose company he most enjoys. An opium high, it turns out, may be the context in which the essential mysticism of traditional Persian culture best reaches fruition.
energy breath
Since 9/11 the increased focus on the Middle East has illustrated that the cultural mind set of the majority of people in this area appear primitive. This idea lead to questions about 19th century Presia because a lot of what I observed on the news and read from the net seemed to reflect this time period. This book is a record of the year that the author spent living and participating in the culture of Persia during 1887-1888. Browne provides a light for the reader to better understand the mind set of the peoples living in the Iran-Iraq area of the Middle East.
Ubranzac
It is unfortunate that majority of analysts refer to more than a century old documents and do not have a clear understanding of Iran and the rest of the region. Probably The Iranians: Persia, Islam and the Soul of a Nation by Sandra McKay could help them to have a better view of todays Middle East. Being at an academic environment and working at a think tank does not make anyone an expert. Thank you.