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by China Williams,Shawn Low

Download Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a shoestring (Travel Guide) fb2
Author: China Williams,Shawn Low
ISBN: 174179854X
Language: English
Pages: 976 pages
Category: Asia
Publisher: Lonely Planet; 16 edition (July 1, 2012)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: lit txt docx mobi
FB2 size: 1735 kb | EPUB size: 1166 kb | DJVU size: 1975 kb
Sub: Traveling

best-selling guide to Southeast Asia Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring is your passport to all the most relevant and . Used this book on my many trips to Southeast Asia. A decent guide with many useful tips.

best-selling guide to Southeast Asia Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring is your passport to all the most relevant and up-to-date advice on what to se.

Shocked by China's super engineering!

I used almost exclusively "our pick" recommended businesses and was rarely disappointed.

This popular travel guide from the Lonely Planet really was the backbone of my trip. I used almost exclusively "our pick" recommended businesses and was rarely disappointed.

You can easily compare and choose from the 10 best Southeast Asia Travel Guides for yo. LONELY PLANET SOUTHEAST ASIA ON A SHOESTRING (TRAVEL GUIDE) By Shawn Low NEW. Southeast asia travel guides. General Australia Travel Guides. Hawaii Travel Guides. General Northeast Us Travel Guides. General South Korea Travel Guides. Get exclusive articles, recommendations, shopping tips, and sales alerts.

Lonely Planet, China Williams, Greg Bloom, Celeste Brash, "Lonely Planet .

Lonely Planet, China Williams, Greg Bloom, Celeste Brash, "Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a shoestring (Travel Guide)" English ISBN: 1742207537 2014 PDF 976 pages 76 MB. Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher. Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to skip, what hidden discoveries await you, and how to optimise your budget for an extended continental trip. Get to the heart of Southeast Asia and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet's Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide

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For 35 years Lonely Planet's Southeast Asia on a Shoestring has been the backpacker's bible. Discover Cambodia's ancient temples, Thailand's island paradises and the best pho in Vietnam. We help you stay longer and spend less

For 35 years Lonely Planet's Southeast Asia on a Shoestring has been the backpacker's bible. We help you stay longer and spend less. Lonely Planet guides are written by experts who get to the heart of every destination they visit.

Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a shoestring (Travel Guide). Free US Delivery ISBN: 1786571196. Lonely Planet Southeast Asia On A Shoestring by Lonely Planet. Customs services and international tracking provided. Lonely Planet-Southeast Asia On A rback.

In this guide - Detailed itineraries to help the reader to plan a great trip; Ea. .

ed to make the most of a trip. In this guide - Detailed itineraries to help the reader to plan a great trip; Eat Cheap and Sleep Easy with budget beds, cheap eats and places to party; Get the low-down on history, environment, culture and current events.

#1 best-selling guide to Southeast Asia*

Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring is your passport to all the most relevant and up-to-date advice on what to see, what to skip, what hidden discoveries await you, and how to optimize your budget for an extended continental trip. Tune into nature everywhere from coral reefs to emerald forests, tap into the region's spirit in ancient cities and temples, and try everything from curry to dim sum; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Southeast Asia and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring Travel Guide:

Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries show you the simplest way to tailor your trip to your own personal needs and interests Insider tips save you time and money and help you get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - including hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, and prices Budget-oriented recommendations with honest reviews - including eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, and hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer and more rewarding travel experience - including customs, history, art, music, architecture, politics, landscapes, wildlife, food, drink, and more Over 170 colour local maps Useful features - including Responsible Travel, Month-by-Month (annual festival calendar), and Big Adventures, Small Budget Coverage of Myanmar (Burma), Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, Philippines, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, and more

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Southeast Asia, our most comprehensive guide to Southeast Asia, is perfect for those planning to both explore the top sights and take the road less travelled.

Looking for just a few of the destinations included in this guide? Check out Lonely Planet's Travel Guides to those particular destinations,our most comprehensive guides that cover both the top sights and take the roads less travelled, or check out Lonely Planet's Discover Guides, which arephoto-rich guides to those destinations'most popular attractions.

Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet, China Williams, Greg Bloom, Celeste Brash, Stuart Butler, Jayne D'Arcy, Shawn Low, Brandon Presser, Nick Ray, Simon Richmond, Daniel Robinson, Adam Skolnick, Iain Stewart, Ryan Ver Berkmoes, and Richard Waters.

About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travellers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in.

TripAdvisor Travelers' Choice Awards 2012 and 2013 winner in Favorite Travel Guide category

'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times

'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' - Fairfax Media (Australia)

*Bestselling guide to Southeast Asia Source: Nielsen Bookscan. Australia, UK and USA, March 2011 to February 2012.

Comments (7)
Syleazahad
I've just received it in the mail today, and boy is it different! I've used the previous two editions, and found them to be extremely helpful. Since then the sale of Lonely Planet to BBC international has been completed, and they've taken a very different path with the book. I'll analyze some of the key differences that I've noticed in my first glance through.

The first thing to notice is the planning your trip section in the beginning. It provides a lot of quick summary information to get the imagination flowing that was lacking from recent editions. I count this as a definite positive step; it makes it easier for me to loan the book out to friends when they ask me why I like going to SE Asia.

In the individual country sections, the summary page at the start of the chapter has been expanded from 2/3 of a page to 1 3/4 of a page, with the highlights section on another page with the map. The expanded summaries are useful for getting a quick feel out for general initial planning.

Unfortunately, there had to be some bad to go along with the good. The city sections within the country are simply not catered to the budget traveler. Unless prices have doubled since 2010 (highly unlikely), the book is geared toward flash-packer and mid-range travelers. For example, while the summary section on Laos suggests that budget hotel rooms, I.E. the ones that a purchaser of this book would be looking for, cost around 10$, which is true. The rooms listed in the city sections, however, range up to $40, with most of them solidly in the $20-$30 range. That's what many people budget for a whole day in Laos. In one instance, the book suggests, not even in one their too plentiful treat yourself boxes, a $58 Bungalow in Vieng Vang, where backpacker bungalows for ~10$ are very common with a little sniffing and haggling.

This phenomenon of not catering to budget travelers is not unique to the Laos section. The Bangkok section lists (as a budget option! Only $ on their scale of $-$$$) a guest house for 1950 Baht. For frame of reference, you can get an hotel room from a name you would recognize for less than that. A search on Kayak or Agoda will reveal a plethora of options for significantly less, and any backpacker can tell you that prices are cheaper on the ground.

The summary is that while the summary sections of the book provide inspiration for the imagination that was lacking in previous editions, this newest version is no longer geared toward true budget travelers. It seems that the days of Lonely Planet having the best SE Asia cheap guidebook are over. And it's a damned shame too; there's nobody apparent to fill the void.
Vizuru
I use this to get a big picture of what I want to do on my trip. It is very helpful for figuring out transportation between cities. However, the accomodations it suggests are rarely the cheapest (what happened to the 'shoestring' part?) so you might have to do some asking around in a new town or use Hostelworld to find the best place for your budget.

Besides this there are the inherent challenges of publishing a guidebook, i.e. things change often and are bound to slip through the cracks of each new edition. I have already been tripped up a couple times because what is written in the book is not always the case anymore. This is most often true for bus prices and even where the buses can be found (enjoy Luang Prabang and it's nightmare web of bus stations). Be sure to pair the book with online research to get the best information.

Still, the book has come in handy more times than I can count. I wouldn't travel without it, especially since Internet is not always available outside of hostels in SE Asia.
Moralsa
I'm going to assume readers are familiar with the content of Lonely Planet guides and just talk about how the guide works on the kindle.

The main advantage of having a travel guide on the Kindle is it cuts down on weight -- and Lonely Planet guides tend to be hefty. The big disadvantage is that it's harder to flip through a digital text on the go: you can't dog ear it, and using bookmarks on a kindle will always keep a series of taps between you and that tidbit of info you were looking for.

To make the kindle guides more useful, Lonely Planet needs to do a few things. Number one, the maps need to be readable. In this addition, using the zoom feature, many, but not all, of the maps were legible. On some maps, it was nearly impossible to make out street names, which makes the map pretty much useless. Second of all, the book needs a ton more indexing and quick links. From the main table of contents, you can jump from country to country -- Thailand to Laos, for example. That brings you to another table of contents where you can jump from city to city -- Bangkok to Chang Mai. But once you're in a section to a city, it becomes painful to go from one section to another --from accommodation to "getting into the city and getting away." You have to keep tapping the screen to get to the section that you want. For big cities, that can mean a lot of taps.

In the end, I appreciated cutting down on the weight in my day pack. But a better solution is to get your friend to buy a physical copy of the book -- and have her carry it around.
Kage
I am not sure the last time anyone form Lonely Planet was in Thailand - at least ten years! Surin beach was NOTHING as described - actually many places were nothing as written in the book. Might be time for Lonely planet to either give it up or get some boots on the ground to really see what each place looks like. Can't really write about Thailand from your couch in Arizona (or wherever they are!)
Whiteseeker
A little outdated. The new version comes out soon, but a little too late for what I needed. Also, unless you are planning to go to every country in this guide, you would probably be better off buying the guides for each country separately. They get more in-depth and are newer. It costs more that way, but then all the pages in the book would be relevant for you.

This was a great jumping off point for me though, and I'll donate it to the goodwill and hopefully inspire someone else!
caster
Fantastic book, but make sure you stray a bit off the very-well beaten path of the recommended sites and places in this book.
Minha
very good fly box
Exactly what I wanted at a price much less than at the local stores. Great quality!!