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by John G. Papastavridis

Download Analytical Mechanics: A Comprehensive Treatise on the Dynamics of Constrained Systems; For Engineers, Physicists, and Mathematicians fb2
Author: John G. Papastavridis
ISBN: 0195126971
Language: English
Pages: 1416 pages
Category: Engineering
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 21, 2002)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: txt lrf azw lit
FB2 size: 1585 kb | EPUB size: 1621 kb | DJVU size: 1957 kb

Analytical Mechanics" forms a nice complement to the author's prior book "Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics. The only downside of the book is the astronomical price the book commands on the used market.

Analytical Mechanics" forms a nice complement to the author's prior book "Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics. While the latter book uses geometrical methods to illuminate the underlying structure of mechanics, this book presents the basic formulations of mechanics in a way that promotes understanding and application.

This is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art, treatise on the energetic mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints)

This is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art, treatise on the energetic mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints). It is a book on advanced dynamics from a unified viewpoint, namely, the kinetic principle of virtual work, or principle of Lagrange. As such, it continues, renovates, and expands the grand tradition laid by such mechanics masters as Appell, Maggi, Whittaker, Heun, Hamel, Chetaev, Synge, Pars, Luré, Gantmacher, Neimark, and Fufaev.

Ackoff reported that it was the most comprehensive systems methodology he has seen. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter.

Life isn't about getting and having, it's about giving and being. Heaven is for Real : A Little Boy's Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back. 99 MB·72,453 Downloads. Ackoff reported that it was the most comprehensive systems methodology he has seen. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New! The principal goals of the study were to articulate the scientific rationale and objectives.

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Analytical Mechanics book. A new work of unrivaled scope, this book is a comprehensive and state-of-the-art treatise on the mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints).

book by John G. Papastavridis. by John G. As such, it continues, renovates, and expands the grand tradition laid by such mechanics masters as Appell, Maggi, Whittaker, Heun, Hamel, Chetaev, Synge, Pars, Lur, Gantmacher, Neimark, and Fufaev.

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ISBN 13: 9780195126976.

John G Papastavridis. This is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art, treatise on the energetic mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints)

John G Papastavridis. This is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art, treatise on the energetic mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints).

By: John G Papastavridis. eTextbook Return Policy.

A new work of unrivaled scope, this book is a comprehensive and state-of-the-art treatise on the mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, that is, classical analytical dynamics, and its principal applications to constrained systems (contact, rolling, and servoconstraints). It is a book on advanced dynamics from a unified viewpoint, namely, the kinetic principle of virtual work, or principle of Lagrange. As such, it continues, renovates, and expands the grand tradition laid by such mechanics masters as Appell, Maggi, Whittaker, Heun, Hamel, Chetaev, Synge, Pars, Lur'e, Gantmacher, Neimark, and Fufaev. In spite of the advanced level, originality, density, rarity, and wealth of the topics covered, this 1,400 page-long volume (the most extensive ever written on analytical mechanics) is eminently readable and inclusive, and in this sense, this unique work constitutes an optimal investment of the reader's time and money ("best buy"). The book is of interest to engineers, physicists, and mathematicians; advanced undergraduate and graduate students and teachers; researchers and professionals; all will find this encyclopedic work an extraordinary asset; for classroom use or self-study.
Comments (7)
Mozel
If you are a theoretical-minded dynamicist (mathematician, physicist or engineer), this is the one book you want with you on an isolated island (and if you have more space in your suitcase, take also Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics). I hate to use hyperbole; therefore I'll just call it a fantastic book; which, in this case, is not a hyperbole at all. It is a 1400 page book, dense with beautiful mathematics, deep insight and criticism, comprehensive historical remarks, and general philosophy. Frequently it is even entertaining. There is a good balance between rigorousness and clarity, there is a meticulous use of notations, an extensive literature survey (even original references from French German and Russian), while the style is humble (which is hard to find these days in high level books). In short, it is a literature per se, and in my opinion, the best, and most comprehensive book, ever written on theoretical mechanics. If one wants to understand the deep theoretical foundations of mechanics, this is the book, and it is very readable.
My only criticism is about the price. It is not that this book isn't worth it; after all, it is the bible of analytical mechanics, no doubt, but even the holy bible costs two orders of magnitude less, thus the price becomes a barrier between this superb book and the potential reader, which is unfortunate.
The book uses the classical and reliable tensor calculus. The good news (to those who are scared of this animal) is that there is a self-contained introduction to tensors, so the reader doesn't have to open any other book to understand the notations. The use of tensors is specified, however, to the book. This author's other book, Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics, is a definite solid source for tensor analysis, and I highly recommend it to the theoretically minded. But the author doesn't just give the tiresome technical details, the book is also full with geometrical explanations and with many self-explanatory plots.
A large part of the book is about the theoretical foundation of numerous approaches to the derivation of the equations of motion, under various constraints, holonomic, non-holonomic and others. As with many other issues, the author is very careful with definitions, and criticizes sloppy definitions and inaccuracies in other references, something that contributes to a deeper understanding of the reader. The book presents the most comprehensive analysis of constraint dynamics I know of. And there are many theoretical tools, such as the transpositional relations the important Frobenius integrability theorem, and more. Then it presents integral approaches, an extensive treatment of the Lagrangian, and variety of variational principles. In addition, there is a comprehensive review of Hamiltonian dynamics, including canonical transformations/perturbations, the beautiful Noether theorem (integrals of motion based on symmetries of action integrals), and more. The part on the Hamiltonian, humbly called "introduction" is in fact equivalent to a whole book on this subject, and it is very well presented. The book also presents some analytical solution methods to classical equations in non-linear dynamics. There are also many interesting, methodical (and non-trivial) examples.
Just a concluding remark. One may argue that a dynamicist needs only one working method. So a small book, presenting, say, Kane's method, is sufficient. I strongly disagree. First, problems in dynamics are different and require different formulation methods. Second, all methods are inter-connected, and a serious dynamicist must see the forest for the trees (and vice versa). Third, the greatest scholars for hundreds of years gave us many analytical tools and insight, and we shouldn't ignore them. This book answers brilliantly all above three arguments.
This book deserves more than 5 stars; but that is Amazon upper limit.
Bludsong
"Analytical Mechanics" fills two essential needs in the mechanics literature. First, it is a good pedagogical textbook, clearly explaining the material and providing a self-contained treatment for study. To this end, the text is clear and the organization is excellent. Examples are well-chosen to amplify important points about mechanics and illustrate the use of theory in solving practical problems. One notable feature of the problems is that they are relevant to engineering. Constraints and mechanisms are readily treated.

Second, the book functions as a comprehensive reference on modern mechanics. The treatment of constraints and equations of motion moves beyond typical considerations of Lagrange's Equations and Hamilton's Equations to consider formulations from the late-19th and 20th centuries. The number of texts which attempt to cover such a broad scope is quite small. In addition, Professor Papastavridis has performed a real service by making available material that was previously unavailable in English.

"Analytical Mechanics" forms a nice complement to the author's prior book "Tensor Calculus and Analytical Dynamics." While the latter book uses geometrical methods to illuminate the underlying structure of mechanics, this book presents the basic formulations of mechanics in a way that promotes understanding and application. Readers of this book will benefit from moving on to the second book to see how deeply geometric structure is intertwined with mechanics.

The only downside of the book is the astronomical price the book commands on the used market. I can only hope that Oxford University Press and/or Professor Papastavridis are able to publish a second edition. I believe there is a market for scholarship of this type.
Erthai
Professor Papastavridis has performed a singular service by creating this book and Oxford University Press is to be commended for publishing such a monumental and intricate work. Incredibly, this book is a distillation of essentially all of the voluminous literature of the field (analytical mechanics of systems with finitely many degrees of freedom) since its creation in the 1700's; what is even more astonishing is that this is the result of the solitary labor of one author.

The exposition is well organized and thorough. The writing is accurate and clear and lively. Terminology and notation are well chosen and consistent. The author's knowledge and mastery of the field and its history, and his respect and enthusiasm for the subject and its contributors, are manifest throughout. This is the book to turn to when you are confronted with incomplete coverage, or inadequate, confusing, or erroneous explanations unfortunately occasionally encountered elsewhere.

The level of abstraction is just right. The mathematical tools used are accessible enough to provide the lowest possible hurdle to the non-mathematician yet powerful enough to get the job done. The extensive bibliography and the author's commentary guide the reader to the many fine books which develop the subject from the points of view of more abstract mathematical theories, but Papastavridis has exposed the irreducible core of the field.

There are many quotations in the chapter headings and in footnotes, which are all relevant and thought provoking and often inspiring, and never random or merely cute as in some other books. Papastavridis is refreshingly open and honest and is not afraid to express controversial opinions.

In an ideal world, other experts would emulate Papastavridis and provide similar readable scholarly treatments of their fields which are as sympathetic to the historical roots and development as to the technical content. But I suspect that the number of people with the depth of knowledge, energy, tenacity, and willingness to forgo more lucrative uses of their time to undertake such tasks is vanishingly small.

Regrettably, the book is no longer available for sale on the Oxford University Press websites, and, even worse, public availability is depressingly limited. For example, in my state of Ohio, which has a population of 11.5 million, many colleges and universities with excellent libraries, and several large and well respected urban public library systems, there are only four publicly viewable copies of the book that I can find - three circulating copies (for those with access) in university libraries and one non-circulating copy in a public library. These facts have contributed to the high prices for the tome on the used book market, currently around $350, which is more than a 50% premium over its last new book price, indicating a healthy demand but putting it out of reach for people of modest means and libraries with tight budgets (i.e., nearly all libraries).

I respectfully suggest to the people at Oxford University Press that, if possible, they find a way to reissue this book in relatively inexpensive form, perhaps a paperback edition of two or three volumes. Such a course of action would provide this work the widespread dissemination it deserves, and make it affordable for academic and public (and corporate and governmental) libraries, and for students, educators, researchers, professionals, and other individuals who are fascinated by the field of analytical mechanics.