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by Jeff Goodell

Download How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth's Climate fb2
Author: Jeff Goodell
ISBN: 0618990615
Language: English
Pages: 262 pages
Category: Engineering
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (April 15, 2010)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: mobi mbr azw rtf
FB2 size: 1822 kb | EPUB size: 1356 kb | DJVU size: 1790 kb

Unfortunately, as the book makes clear, we are heading inexorably toward a situation where geoengineering to cool the planet may be our only hope .

Unfortunately, as the book makes clear, we are heading inexorably toward a situation where geoengineering to cool the planet may be our only hope of maintaining a habitable world. As sobering as this prospect is, reading a book like Goodell’s can help us prepare intellectually, if not emotionally, for what may be coming. To be absolutely truthful, I finished Jeff Goodell's How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth's Climate three weeks ago, before all of the end of semester hullabaloo took over my life. It's a relatively easy and quick read, but I'll admit: I'm a skeptic.

A Q&A with Jeff Goodell, Author of How to Cool the Planet.

Product Description When Jeff Goodell first encountered the term "geoengineering," he had a vague sense that it involved outlandish schemes to counteract global warming. As a journalist, he was deeply skeptical. But he was also intrigued. A Q&A with Jeff Goodell, Author of How to Cool the Planet. Q: What is geoengineering? A: It's the idea of manipulating the earth's climate as a way to reduce the risks from global warming. If that sounds dangerous and scary and downright crazy, it is.

Goodell follows Big Coal (2006) with a lively and invaluable introduction to the simultaneously alarming and . In this vividly written, thoughtful book, Jeff Goodell helps readers explore the audacious question of whether humans can use technology to fix the very problem it's created.

Goodell follows Big Coal (2006) with a lively and invaluable introduction to the simultaneously alarming and promising field of geoengineerin. opefully his incisive and entertaining overview will help shape the debate. How to Cool the Planet is thoughtful, informative, and darkly entertaining. Juliet Eilperin, national environmental reporter, Washington Post. This could be the most important book written about the climate.

Jeff Goodell: It’s the idea of manipulating the Earth’s climate as a way to reduce the risks from global warming. There are two basic methods to cool the planet. The quickest but most dangerous method is simply to reflect away some of the sunlight

Jeff Goodell: It’s the idea of manipulating the Earth’s climate as a way to reduce the risks from global warming. The quickest but most dangerous method is simply to reflect away some of the sunlight. To offset the warming that comes from a doubling of greenhouse gas pollution, all you have to do is reduce the amount of sunlight that hits the Earth by 1 or 2 percent - which, it turns out, is not that difficult. One way is to mimic a volcano and throw a small amount of dust into the stratosphere; the particles act as tiny mirrors, scattering sunlight.

When Jeff Goodell first encountered the term geoengineering, he had a vague sense that it involved outlandish schemes t. .The planet was in trouble. Could geoengineers help?As Goodell shows in this bracing book, even if we could muster the political will for it, cutting greenhouse-gas emissions alone may not be enough to reduce the risk of climate catastrophe.

But as Jeff Goodell points out, the economic crisis, combined with global political realities, is making these ideas look sane, even inspired. Goodell himself started out as a skeptic, concerned about tinkering with the planet’s thermostat

But as Jeff Goodell points out, the economic crisis, combined with global political realities, is making these ideas look sane, even inspired. Goodell himself started out as a skeptic, concerned about tinkering with the planet’s thermostat.

In the highly contentious climate debate geoengineering remains one of the most controversial, yet intriguing, remaining questions. - Juliet Eilperin, national environmental reporter, Washington Post. Goodell compellingly describes the characters, ideas and motivations of a small band of geoengineers, scientists who would manipulate.

Электронная книга "How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth's Climate", Jeff Goodell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth's Climate" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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In this vividly written, thoughtful book, Jeff Goodell helps readers explore the audacious question of whether humans can use technology to fix the very problem it's created. - Juliet Eilperin, national environmental reporter, Washington Post "This could be the most important book written about the climate.

Climate discussions often focus on potential impacts over a long period of time-several decades, a century even. This is the radical and controversial world of geoengineering. How to Cool the Planet, Jeff Goodell explores the scientific, political, and moral aspects of geoengineering. But change could also happen much more suddenly. How are we going to change the temperature of whole regions if we can’t even predict next week’s weather? What about wars waged with climate control as the primary weapon?

Climate discussions often focus on potential impacts over a long period of timeâ?several decades, a century even. But change could also happen much more suddenly. What if we had a real climate emergencyâ?how could we cool the planet in a hurry? This question has led a group of scientists to pursue extreme solutions: huge contraptions that would suck CO2 from the air, machines that brighten clouds and deflect sunlight away from the earth, even artificial volcanoes that spray heat-reflecting particles into the atmosphere. This is the radical and controversial world of geoengineering. How to Cool the Planet, Jeff Goodell explores the scientific, political, and moral aspects of geoengineering. How are we going to change the temperature of whole regions if we can’t even predict next week’s weather? What about wars waged with climate control as the primary weapon? There are certainly risks, but Goodell persuades us that geoengineering may be our last best hope, a Plan B for the environment. And if it is, we need to know enough to get it right.
Comments (7)
Wishamac
I enjoyed Mr. Goodell's writing for the most part--he is clever and imaginative--and it seems he has done hundreds of high-profile interviews with the main players in this field. However, I often found myself wondering why the generally accepted assumptions about our need to save human life were not challenged. Yes, of course, we care about the suffering of other humans and we grieve especially about loss of life. But, the reality is that our numbers are already far beyond the earth's carrying capacity. I often read estimates of the need to reduce our numbers by 70 to 90% for sustainability. If so much damage hadn't already been done to our oceans, soils, fresh water resources, etc., the reduction needed would not be so severe, I'm told.

Mr. Goodell's book fails because it doesn't question our assumption that we must continue to resist the workings of nature. It fails to pose the question sufficiently: Why can't we bear the thought of letting nature take its course? It takes too strong of a stance for resistance. Mother Nature, if she lets us persist beyond, say, year 2100 will find ways to cull billions of us in the coming decades so that we can. We need talented writers like Mr. Goodell to no only help us understand the ways those in power might further foul our nest, as he has, but also understand how to adjust our underlying assumptions to be aligned to the extremely disquieting reality of our unsustainable numbers.
Modimeena
According to many scientists that are involved with climate change research, we may already be at or very near the point of no return due to the amount of carbon dioxide already present in the atmosphere. If that is the case, are we already doomed to massive rises in ocean levels, changes in monsoon patterns, increased drought and any other number of possible side effects of global warming? These are the questions that the author of this book attempts to answer by interviewing a number of experts in the field of global climate change.

One of the answers that has been proposed is that we "geoengineer" the planet by trying a number of different techniques to lessen the amount of sun light that is striking the earth. Some of the ideas have been outlandish: dropping millions of styrofoam balls in the ocean, sending giant umbrellas into space to "shade" the earth, and other equally weird proposals. Some of the ideas, however, are much simpler and much more likely to be cost effective and effective in lowering the amount of sun hitting the planet. Included in these ideas are pumping small particulate matter into the upper atmosphere, increasing the reflectivity of clouds and dumping thousand of tons of iron into the ocean to increase the amount of plankton, which would absorb carbon dioxide from the air.

The author explores these ideas and provides a background into the history of geoengineering as well interviewing key players that have been involved in trying to find a solution to climate change. The author also explores the ethical and moral obligations that geoengineering would hold, as well as how the concept would be regulated and by whom.

The book is well written and provides a glimpse into the possible solutions that may be proposed if we are, in fact, past the tipping point. If you don't believe global warming exists, then there will be nothing in this book for you. If, however, you do believe in global warming I would highly recommend this book, as it offers a glimpse into what the future may hold.
Arashitilar
This is a well-written and thoughtful book on what may be the most important topic of the 21st century.

The author got the idea for the book from Nobel-laurete Paul Crutzen's 2006 paper about injecting sulfur into the upper atmosphere to offset global warming. Crutzen wrote that paper because he believes that counting on nations to reduce CO2 emissions is a "pious wish"; and because it may already be too late to stave off disaster by simply cutting emissions since too much CO2 may have already been emitted (CO2 can remain in the upper atmosphere for thousands of years).

The author profiles some of the key players in the emerging geo-engineering field and discusses various technologies such as sulfur injection, cloud reflectivity and CO2 extraction (directly from the air or by adding iron to the ocean to promote plankton). In various interludes, he also recounts the history of geo-engineering (going back to 19th century rainmakers) and the modern parallels with nuclear weapons. In fact, Edward Teller, the father of the H-bomb, was an early proponent of geo-engineering. Even without concerns of global warming, it seems that geo-engineering will be an emerging technology because of potential military uses and mankind's long dream to control weather.

There's relatively little discussion on the science of global warming: up-front, the author says the book is not for skeptics or deniers. However, some interesting facts about the debate come up. While drawing parallels between GW and ozone depletion, the author reveals that computer models of ozone depletion during the 1980s were wrong! They showed no threat from CFCs - it wasn't until scientists actually made real measurements that they discovered the ozone hole over Antarctica. The author also notes that "climate sensitivity" (largely determined by clouds) to CO2 is poorly understood. The guesstimate is that it ranges from 2 to 10C for a doubling of CO2- but if the real figure is at the low-end, then GW won't be a major concern after all.

So I think it's sheer arrogance for the left to insist that GW will be a disaster; or for the right to deny the earth is even warming at the other extreme- no one knows how it'll play out because GW is truly like an onion with endless layers of complexity. Personally, I think the left have the stronger case since the Arctic is in fact melting (at an unprecedented rate that was not predicted by computer models).

One recurring fear that comes up again and again in the book is the sobering fact that if rapid, runaway warming occurs, then sulfur injection is the only "fix" that can be deployed quickly enough to save human civilization. (Most people assume GW, if it's even happening, will occur gradually over decades, but it's possible that it could be a sudden shift into an entirely different climate state- more like an earthquake- once a "tipping point" is reached.) So for that reason alone, geo-engineering won't go away, and in fact, may be a necessary evil. As Crutzen says, "we must prepare for the worst".
Dawncrusher
a winner...beautifully and clearly written and very important if you want to know what the future holds for us.