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by Michael S. Berger

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Author: Michael S. Berger
ISBN: 0195122690
Language: English
Pages: 240 pages
Category: Judaism
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (October 15, 1998)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: mobi lrf mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1197 kb | EPUB size: 1679 kb | DJVU size: 1653 kb

Berger points out that rabbinic authority means different things for different communities. For the most traditional Jews, rabbinic authority means complete obedience to the halachic tradition first put in writing by the rabbis of the Mishna and Talmud.

Berger points out that rabbinic authority means different things for different communities. But even the least traditional Jews defer to rabbinic authority to some extent (otherwise Reform Jews wouldn't follow rabbinically created holidays such as Hanukah and Purim). 2 people found this helpful.

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In this book, Michael S. Berger analyzes the notion of Rabbinic authority from a philosophical standpoint

In this book, Michael S. Berger analyzes the notion of Rabbinic authority from a philosophical standpoint. He sets out a typology of theories that can be used to understand the authority of these Sages, showing the coherence of each, its strengths and weaknesses, and what aspects of the Rabbinic enterprise it covers. His careful and thorough analysis reveals that owing to the multifaceted character of the Rabbinic enterprise, no single theory is adequate to fully ground Rabbinic authority as traditionally understood

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by Michael S. Berger. The Rabbis of the first five centuries of the Common Era loom large in the Jewish tradition. Until the modern period, Jews viewed the Rabbinic traditions as the authoritative contents of their covenant with God, and scholars debated the meanings of these ancient Sages words.

Michael S. Berger - Rabbinic Authority : The Authority of the Talmudic Sages. Читать pdf. Mondon . Stadler H. - Nanoanalysis of Biomaterials. Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmbH - China's Management Revolution: Spirit, Land, Energy (think: act International Management Knowledge). Roland Berger Strategy Consultants GmbH.

Understanding the authority of the rabbis . The rise of critical biblical studies revealed a gap between the religion of the Bible and Rabbinic Judaism.

Understanding the authority of the rabbis, the sages of the Mishnah and Talmud who lived during the first five centuries of the common era, has always been a tricky business. The sages grounded their authority on the concept of the dual Torah-the belief that God revealed to Moses, in addition to the written Torah, an oral Torah, which was passed down in an unbroken chain from generation to generation. On what basis, then, are the pronouncements of the talmudic sages authoritative for subsequent generations of Jews? Export citation Request permission.

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Rabbinic Authority : The Authority of the Talmudic Sages

Rabbinic Authority : The Authority of the Talmudic Sages. The Authority of Reason The Authority of Reason. The Authority of Reason The Authority of Reason argues against much contemporary orthodoxy in philosophy and the social. Rabbinic Authority : The Authority of the Talmudic Sages The Authority of Reason. Report "The Believer's Authority".

The Rabbis of the first five centuries of the Common Era loom large in the Jewish tradition. Until the modern period, Jews viewed the Rabbinic traditions as the authoritative contents of their covenant with God, and scholars debated the meanings of these ancient Sages words. Even after the eighteenth century, when varied denominations emerged within Judaism, each with its own approach to the tradition, the literary legacy of the talmudic Sages continued to be consulted.In this book, Michael S. Berger analyzes the notion of Rabbinic authority from a philosophical standpoint. He sets out a typology of theories that can be used to understand the authority of these Sages, showing the coherence of each, its strengths and weaknesses, and what aspects of the Rabbinic enterprise it covers. His careful and thorough analysis reveals that owing to the multifaceted character of the Rabbinic enterprise, no single theory is adequate to fully ground Rabbinic authority as traditionally understood. The final section of the book argues that the notion of Rabbinic authority may indeed have been transformed over time, even as it retained the original name. Drawing on the debates about legal hermeneutics between Ronald Dworkin and Stanley Fish, Berger introduces the idea that Rabbinic authority is not a strict consequence of a preexisting theory, but rather is embedded in a form of life that includes text, interpretation, and practices. Rabbinic authority is shown to be a nuanced concept unique to Judaism, in that it is taken to justify those sorts of activities which in turn actually deepen the authority itself.Students of Judaism and philosophers of religion in general will be intrigued by this philosophical examination of a central issue of Judaism, conducted with unprecedented rigor and refreshing creative insight.