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by Kage Baker

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Author: Kage Baker
ISBN: 0765318903
Language: English
Pages: 304 pages
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (May 12, 2009)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: rtf lrf mbr mobi
FB2 size: 1386 kb | EPUB size: 1449 kb | DJVU size: 1298 kb

The Empress of Mars (2003) (novella version). Dark Mondays" (2006). The Best of Kage Baker (2012) (includes stories set in and out of the Company universe).

The Empress of Mars (2003) (novella version). Rude Mechanicals (2007). Ancient Rockets: Treasures and Trainwrecks of the Silent Screen (2012) Tachyon Publications.

The Company was taking anyone it could get, and it was right after the Edinburgh Treaty was signed.

You can read book The Empress of Mars by Kage Baker in our library for absolutely free. The Company was taking anyone it could get, and it was right after the Edinburgh Treaty was signed. We bent over backwards for anyone we could induce to come up here. Takes all kinds to settle a world,’ that was the official slogan. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

The Empress of Mars book.

The Empress of Mars BOOKS BY KAGE BAKER The Anvil of the World Dark Mondays Mother Aegypt and Other Stories The House . Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC. 175 Fifth Avenue.

The Empress of Mars BOOKS BY KAGE BAKER The Anvil of the World Dark Mondays Mother Aegypt and Other Stories The House of Stag The Empress of Mars The Company Series I.

The Company (Volume 9). Kage Baker. Praise for The Empress of Mars. seen through the eyes of a writer far more poetic, vastly more scientifically literate, and with an infinitely superior sense of humor. Even as science-fictional taverns go, The Empress of Mars is memorable, a joint I hope I'll be able to return to many times. Spider Robinson, author of Very Hard Choices. For my money, The Empress of Mars is the one to read.

When the British Arean Company founded its Martian colony, it welcomed any settlers it could ge. But Mary and her struggles and triumphs is at the center of it all, in her bar, the Empress of Mars. Based on the Hugo-nominated novella of the same name, this is a rollicking novel of action, planetary romance, and high adventure. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

When the British Arean Company founded its Martian colony, it welcomed any settlers it could get. Outcasts, misfits, and dreamers emigrated in droves to undertake the grueling task of terraforming the cold red planet-only to be abandoned when the BAC discovered it couldn't turn a profit on Mars.

The Empress of Mars (Company). SUMMARY: This collection brings together the early Company stories in one volume for the first time with three previously unpublished works, including "The Queen in Yellow," written exclusively for this compilation. In these tales sci-fi fans follow the secret activities of the Company's field agents—once human, now centuries-old time-traveling immortal cyborgs—as they attempt to retrieve history's lost treasures.

Read "The Empress of Mars Set in the World of the Company" by Kage Baker . Books related to The Empress of Mars. Outcasts, misfits and.

The Empress of Mars Baker Kage Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS 9780765325518 : When the British Arean Company .

The Empress of Mars Baker Kage Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS 9780765325518 : When the British Arean Company founded its Martian colony, it welcomed any settlers it could get. Outcasts, misfits, and . This book also tells the story of Manco Inca, whose attempt to terraform Mars brought a new goddess vividly to life; of Stanford Crosley, con man extraordinaire; and of Ottorino Vespucci, space cowboy.

When the British Arean Company founded its Martian colony, it welcomed any settlers it could get.Outcasts, misfits and dreamers emigrated in droves to undertake the grueling task of terraforming the cold red planet--only to be abandoned when the BAC discovered it couldn't turn a profit on Mars.This is the story of Mary Griffith, a determined woman with three daughters, who opened the only place to buy a beer on the Tharsis Bulge. It's the story of Manco Inca, whose attempt to terraform Mars brought a new goddess vividly to life; of Stanford Crosley, con man extraordinaire; of Ottorino Vespucci, space cowboy and romantic hero; of the Clan Morrigan, of the denizens of the Martian Motel, and of the machinations of another Company entirely, all of whom contribute to the downfall of the BAC and the founding of a new world. But Maryand her struggles and triumphs is at the center of it all,in her bar, the Empress of Mars.Based on the Hugo-nominated novella of the same name,this is a rollicking novel of action,planetary romance, and high adventure.

Comments (7)
Gogul
I picked this book up after seeing it on a list somewhere and I finally got around to reading it. I like the writing style and there is a lot going on. It feels like it is setting the foundation for so much more, even though it feels like we are jumping in part way. Initially, I thought this might have been the first book in the series, but it turns out it is set in the same vast universe as another set of 8 books, multiple novellas and short stories.

From what I have read online, this book is set in that universe (The Company) but is a separate story, so knowledge of the other events in the universe are not required. I don't know if that is true, but this book read fine on its own to me. Apparently, this is an expansion of one of the early novellas in the series.

There is plenty of sci-fi technology, especially since the entire story is set on a Mars colony, and enough political intrigue to keep many people happy. Most of the main conflict introduced is wrapped up in this book, although, like I wrote before, it feels like the stage is set for more. I do not believe there was ever a follow-on published, but I enjoyed it enough.
Kea
This is one of my favorite books by Kage Baker. I've lost count of how many times I've read it. I bought this copy as a gift for my son, who recently was reading Baker's Company series, of which this is an offshoot.

This is a well-written book with a good plot and a great deal of humor. It is a spin-off from her Company novels, telling a story that is a prequel to the events in the main series. It may help to have read the Company novels, as there are a couple of characters a reader will recognize from the main series, but it isn't necessary to read the others. This book works very well as a stand-alone story. I only wish Baker had written another one, a sequel to this one, perhaps, because the characters are people you'd like to know and see again in another story. However, it's too late, as Kage Baker passed away a few years ago.
Anarus
In the early 24th century, Mars is a place where only the hardiest survive. Mary Griffith runs the Empress...the only spot on the planet where one can order a pint of beer after a long day of hauling polar ice or working in fields where only the most tenacious of crops survive. Mary Griffith has welcomed a motley assortment of characters into her life...from a one-eyed heretic who is hiding from the far-flung reaches of a church to an ostracized heir of an Italian import/export company, Mary Griffith is known to accept the lost, the broken, the down-trodden into her Empress. But when the corporation that runs Mars -- the British Arean Company -- begins to cause problems for those who call the Empress home, Mary Griffith will move heaven and earth to see that she and her band of misfits manages to survive in an already inhospitable environment.

The Empress of Mars is a charming foray from a different perspective into Baker's Company universe. While her previous tales focus on the cyborgs that form the primary workforce of Dr. Zeus, Inc., this tale is told from a normal Human perspective...however, the author makes abundantly clear that the cyborgs of Dr. Zeus are, like all matters important to history, manipulating the situation from the inside.

Baker's trademark wit and humor is, once again, evident in this tale. And, despite the fact that this book was obviously meant to avoid the cyborgs' perspective and focus on how normal Humans are struggling to terraform Mars, I do wish we could have been let in on the cyborgs' point of view. I would have liked to have known what they were thinking at crucial points throughout the book...instead of just the tantalizing hints the author gave us.

Nonetheless, The Empress of Mars is a notable addition to Baker's Company and well worth the time spent reading it.
Gandree
This is a glorious book, Baker at the top of her form. It is indeed a "rollicking" adventure, full of high-jinx and one-upmanship, but more than that it is an ode to the pioneering spirit in general and the Old West in particular. It is what Joss Whedon's Firefly was at its best, full of broadly-drawn but charismatic characters scrapping together the sort of life no longer allowed in more "civilized" parts of the galaxy. There is a gold rush of sorts, and a cattle stampede, and skeezy nefarious types looking to balk our heroes at every turn; there is also corporate espionage, religious intolerance, and some major technical obstacles to overcome in the still largely un-terraformed landscape; but mostly there is just a group of misfits bands together with ingenuity, stubbornness, and a judicious application of force to forge a kinder -- but much less gentle -- society in the wilderness.

For longtime readers of the Company novels some familiar faces appear -- Eliphal and Joseph, though Joseph is going by another name -- and the hand of the Company is clear in everything that occurs; but that backstory is largely opaque to the newcomer to the series, so this novel does read well as a stand alone. A newcomer might find some of the implications about our future a little peculiar, but rest assured that any strangeness is explained in the larger series, and it's really not the point of this novel anyway. This is not science fiction with any particular scientific or political or philosophical bone to pick; it's pure, unadulterated fun, much like the Edgar Rice Burroughs Barsoom novels that the colonists lovingly pay homage to, except with less problematic gender and race relations and a veneer of scientific plausibility. (Baker does manage to keep the canals though.)