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by Lloyd Biggle

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Author: Lloyd Biggle
ISBN: 0450045536
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: New English Library Ltd; New edition edition (February 1, 1980)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: docx mbr rtf lrf
FB2 size: 1357 kb | EPUB size: 1809 kb | DJVU size: 1368 kb

Lloyd Biggle Jr. 1. There were riots on the nearby world of Sornor, and on Mestil the renowned Galactic Zoological Gardens had been closed to protect the animals from an enraged populace.

Lloyd Biggle Jr. Just call me Ritha, she said brightly, as Rearm Hylat, the hostel’s tall, gaunt proprietor, squinted uncertainly at her signature. The granddaughter of Donov’s World Manager. possessed a legion of friends, and an encounter with one of them while using an alias could have been embarrassing.

Lloyd Biggle was a lesser known American 1960s-and-onward science fiction writer who passed away in 2002

Lloyd Biggle was a lesser known American 1960s-and-onward science fiction writer who passed away in 2002. I read his 1972 SF novel The Light That Never Was in a vintage DAW original paperback (No. 52). I long ago read another Biggle novel Silence is Deadly, but found it unmemorable. The Light That Never Was is set on Donov, a planet of artists, painters specifically, most of whom subsist on the tourist trade and the on the laurels of past artists

Book by Biggle J. Lloyd. Final Thoughts (some spoilers).

Book by Biggle J. The Light That Never Was is structurally a disjointed mess of a novel with no real characters (they are interchangeable names), no tension, and a complete refusal to develop the animaloid Mesz species into anything else than pseudo-human looking gentle folk. That said, the focus on art and the making of art - especially during a period of definitive malaise - is well done.

Biggle, Lloyd, 1923-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. (April 17, 1923 – September 12, 2002), was an American musician, author, and internationally known oral historian. Biggle was born in 1923 in Waterloo, Iowa

Lloyd Biggle Jr. Biggle was born in 1923 in Waterloo, Iowa. He served in World War II as a communications sergeant in a rifle company of the 102nd Infantry Division; during the war, he was wounded twice. His second wound, a shrapnel wound in his leg received near the Elbe River at the end of the war, left him disabled for life.

The Chronocide Mission. Lloyd Biggle, Jr. BERNAL

The Chronocide Mission. by Lloyd Biggle Jr. In memory of JOHN FLORY, who asked for it. Note for the reader. BERNAL. Bernal awakened suddenly to the drumming of horses’ hoofs on a forest road. Suddenly a beam of light cut through the darkness, passing over his head with a deafening crash, severing branches, searing the foliage, and leaving in its wake tiny flames that flickered momentarily on the leaves it had touched. Bernal sank to one knee and froze there. The light stabbed again and again with the same violent clap of sound. A dog screamed, and a man, and Bernal caught the revolting reek of burnt flesh.

Used availability for Lloyd Biggle Jr's The Light That Never Wa. December 1999 : USA Paperback.

Select Format: Hardcover. Book by Biggle J. ISBN13:9781587150548. Release Date:December 1999.

Lloyd Biggle, Jr. The IPR Bureau (whose motto is "Democracy imposed from without is the severest form of tyranny") works to bring newly discovered planets up to the . The Light That Never Was. Read online. The IPR Bureau (whose motto is "Democracy imposed from without is the severest form of tyranny") works to bring newly discovered planets up to the point where they have a planetary democratic government and then induct them into the galactic federation. Unfortunately, the planet Furnil offers problems. The continent of Kurr has a well-entrenched monarchy, and the citizens seem little inclined to change ? Classic scie.

1st double edition paperback, fine In stock shipped from our UK warehouse
Comments (3)
Danskyleyn
This novel is a complex story simply told. The artists of planet Donov are all human with one exception (a swamp slug), and they're all hacks nowadays (except the aforementioned slug). Although the classic views are still there, and the incredible light of Donov that once inspired master artists, the scenes are appreciated now only by tourists, and those who paint souvenirs to sell to them.

But there's a change sweeping the human-settled universe. On world after world, people who had lived in harmony with animaloid sentients suddenly rise up in riots and massacre their non-humanoid neighbors.

This wave of change sweeps over Donov without effect, for Donov has no sentient animaloids—that is, until Jaward Jorno comes home. Jorno is an incredibly wealthy local who arrives, ready to put his family's large estate to use as a refugee camp for the brilliant mesz, natives of Mestil. And while refugees are not allowed on this world, Jorno learns of a loophole in Donov law that says artists may stay for as long as they like. So 3,000 alien animaloid refugees become artists.

Now that there are animaloids on Donov, will the wave of riots touch this planet as well? Fighting this trend is the World Manager Ian Korak and his lovely grand-daughter Eritha, Korak's First Secretary Neal Wargen (who is secretly the head of the Secret Police, and not so secretly in love with Eritha Korak), and Arnen Brand, who provides a home for the slug and sells its artwork to finance a little refugee work of his own.

Biggle uses the concepts of art well in his work. This novel explores the urge to create, the pain of knowing one's work to be second-rate, the difference between creating art and "putting paint on canvas", and the role of the art critic.

The artistic topics are background, however, to the detail of this particular painting. One of the characters is a tragically flawed personality, acting in ways that have doomed dozens of worlds. Minor accents illustrate the spiteful sterility of bigotry and the liberating effects of tolerance. But the major theme of this artwork is even more sweeping: Is it enough to do Good Works? Or must one actually accomplish good?

There are books that are worth rereading, whose stories remain fresh. Like a great painting, they reward the viewer each time they are approached. Biggle's novel is a Goya, at least. Perhaps even a Hieronymus Bosch.
Ionzar
The Light That Never Was (1972) is an unusual take on space opera -- there are no battles, voyages on spaceships, weird technology, or heroic figures. Instead, the swirling eddies of interstellar change descend on a tourist planet replete with legions of rather atrocious, silly, and easily maleable "artists." The island of Zrilund on the plant of Donev is afflicted by a general artistic malaise -- artists paint for the swarms of tourists which descend on the fountains and beaches of the island snatching up souvenirs.

Brief Plot Summary

Humanity has stretched out over thousands and thousands of worlds. Each planet is virtually independent from one another. Various intelligent species have been discovered but humans start putting them in camps, killing them, refusing to grant them any rights, and branding them with derogatory names (for example, animaloids). This massive anti-animaloid furor spreading across the populated worlds threatens to envelope the tourist-trap planet Donev. However, Donev does not appear to have any indigenous animaloids of their own.

A famous art gallery owner hears rumors of a new style of paintings drastically different than the normal tourist influenced fare. He investigates and discovers Arnen Brand living in a swamp with a swamp slog who "paints" at night. He decides to open an anonymous gallery.

At the same time, Jaward Jorno -- a millionaire philanthropist -- manages to save 3,000 intelligent Mesz animaloids from a massacre on their planet and sneak them onto Donev by supplying them with art permits. But is he really the philanthropist he claims to be? With 3,000 animaloids and weird animaloid art Donev becomes a tinderbox for anti-animaloid sentiment and potentially a massacre.

The "main" character of the novel is the rather banal First Secretary to the World Manager Neal Wargen who tries to prevent the disaster. He's in love with Eritha, the daughter of World Manager Ian Korak. Eritha is the most interesting character, she desires to learn about the artists and plays a key role despite being an atrocious artist.

Final Thoughts (some spoilers)

The Light That Never Was is structurally a disjointed mess of a novel with no real characters (they are interchangeable names), no tension, and a complete refusal to develop the animaloid Mesz species into anything else than pseudo-human looking gentle folk.

That said, the focus on art and the making of art -- especially during a period of definitive malaise -- is well done. How often is this the MAIN thrust of a work? In Philip K. Dick's masterpiece The Man in the High Castle (1962) the production of new "American" art in a world dominated by the Japanese symbolizes the slow rebirth of a society. Lloyd Biggle Jr. tries to convey the same thing, the near miss pogrom against the animloids transforms Donev's artist population. However, Philip K. Dick's characters are more intriguing and the prose far superior.

The Light That Never Was is conceptually more interesting than its delivery. Despite a focus ON art one gets the feeling that Biggle doesn't know very much ABOUT art. Thankfully, Biggle is careful in constructing an irrational ignorance on part of the humans towards the harmless animaloids reflecting the social realities of his day.

Worth reading if only for the unorthodox subject matter. The ideas trump the delivery...
Iseared
If you're tired of the usual spaceship sci fi, and elves and dragons fantasy, then try this book. It's different! It's set on a tourist planet whose economy revolves around artists, in a universe where space travel is common. There are mysteries to solve, and some nice characterizations of human nature, with subtle humour throughout. The author uses a new perspective which I found very refreshing.