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by Michael P. Kube-McDowell

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Author: Michael P. Kube-McDowell
ISBN: 044169912X
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: Ace; Reprint edition (March 1, 1991)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lit lrf docx rtf
FB2 size: 1966 kb | EPUB size: 1319 kb | DJVU size: 1805 kb

Читать онлайн The Quiet Pools. Kube-McDowell Michael . .The fast-running pool of liquid had already reached the east edge of the apron and begun to spread across the hard earth and brown grass.

Читать онлайн The Quiet Pools.by Michael P. Kube-McDowell. Grabbing his viewer, the corpsec trained it on the spill. Wraithlike white wisps played in the air above its surface.

Kube-McDowell Michael The Quiet Pools - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. Надеемся, Вы провели время с удовольствием!

Kube-McDowell Michael The Quiet Pools - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. Надеемся, Вы провели время с удовольствием! Поделитесь, пожалуйста, своими впечатлениями

Michael P. Kube-Mcdowell Nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1991.

Michael P. Nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1991.

Michael Paul Kube-McDowell (born August 29, 1954), also known as Michael McDowell or Michael P. McDowell, is an American science fiction and non-fiction author. Born Michael Paul McDowell on August 29, 1954 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), he attended St. Joseph's High School (Camden, New Jersey) (Class of 1972) and Michigan State University.

Unfortunately he forgot to tell a story. The Quiet Pools is little more than the build up to a sequel that was never written and quite probably never intended

Kube has crafted a detailed and plausible picture of the future. His characterizations have depth and honesty. Much of this novel is compelling and intriguing. Unfortunately he forgot to tell a story. The Quiet Pools is little more than the build up to a sequel that was never written and quite probably never intended. The entire book however, is just the build up BEFORE the ship launches.

The Quiet Pools book. Michael Kube-McDowell has written a book about the ultimate predicament and opportunity of the human species. In view of the scarcity of serious books on this theme, Kube-McDowell's work would be important whatever the style and craft of its writing. But the book is a pleasure to read. I should also mention that it is a science fiction novel. Kube - McDowell - The Quiet Pools. Asimov, Isaac - RC1 - Kube-Mcdowell, Michael P - Odyssey, Isaac Asimov's Robot City Book 1. Asimov Isaac.

The Quiet Pools Michael P. CHAPTER 1 тАФGAUтАФ "This is JeremiahтАж". From the elevated guard station at the main entrance to Allied Transcon's Houston center, a young corpsec monitored the truck trundling up Galveston Road toward NASA Boulevard. With his televiewer, he could see that the rider cabin of the robot tractor was empty. The dull silver tank trailer bore the familiar logo of Shell Chemical.

Controversy arises over the Diaspora Project, a program designed to carry ten thousand men and women to a new life outside the solar system, and the Homeworld movement, led by the mysterious Jeremiah, threatens to stop it no matter what the cost
Comments (6)
Burilar
I came across this book in a jumble sale. The objectively ugly cover (in the Italian edition), which reminds me of a manual, was almost discouraging me from buying it, but convinced by the price, I decided to pick it up. When I started reading it, I was immediately pleasantly surprised by the opening scene featuring some action, which won my last hesitation due to the many typos.
Although the original book was published in 1990, the future in it is still fairly plausible, although some anachronism can be noticed. However, it isn’t much.
The story goes parallel with the events regarding some characters, which then end up joining in an unexpected way. I immediately felt a bond with Christopher’s character, which, because of the remarkable presence in the scenes, and the fact that his deep psychological introspection is shown, has a role very similar to a protagonist.
The plot deals with the imminent launch of an interstellar ship, Memphis, with ten thousand future colonists of a new world, the method by which they are selected, and the attempt to boycott this mission by a movement contrary to it, whose supporters believe that we need to improve the situation on Earth before going to other worlds and that, in particular, depriving our planet of some of its brighter minds is wrong. Their conviction comes into fanaticism with acts of violence, murder, and even terrorism.
The way in which those who are in this movement reason (if this can be call reasoning) is really scary. Ignorance, insanity, and cruelty characterise them and suggest a reflection that can be easily applied to certain aggressive outbreaks made today on social networks, when it comes to the colonisation of Mars or in general to space exploration. You feel relieved that they are just words and that there is no one like Jeremiah (of this novel) capable of fomenting such people, just because they wouldn’t be able to go beyond the show of their ignorance and the outburst of their frustrations on the web.
Yet reading the terrible actions of Jeremiah’s followers in this novel, even if it is fiction, made me feel the same disgust mixed with fear that such comments on Facebook are more and more often able to arise in me.
In this context, which is already interesting in itself, a number of extremely controversial characters are inserted, as is the kind of future society shown in the novel in some ways. Among that, for example, the existence of marriages with more than two people, often even open ones, made me grimace, because the way it is shown reduces the very concept of marriage to having someone to whom you are physically attracted available in the same house. The topic seemed to be put there to highlight some personal problems of a character, without however having an own credibility. In addition, in the end, I was happy with the way that particular aspect resolved in the story of that character (and I must say that this has contributed to the overall liking of the book).
However, I don’t want to go into detail, because I think that the less you know about the plot of this book, the more you have the chance to be positively surprised. I just say it’s a complex novel, but so well structured that it does need to be too long. This probably depends on the fact that the original plot comes from an unpublished old short story by the same author, which he expanded, preventing it to explode in a thousand directions, as it happens when you start from an idea not quite defined. What came out is a work that combines the synthesis with a satisfactory development of the narrative strands, embellished here and there by totally unpredictable twists and accelerations of the action.
If you love that kind of hard science fiction in which the characters’ introspection is not overlooked, as it plays a crucial role in the story equal with the one of the so-called “big themes”, and you run into this text, don’t let it escape.

Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli, author of Red Desert - Point of No Return
Yndanol
First of all you have to care about at least some characters in a novel, and it was not clear how important Christopher McCutchen was till well into the story. I guessed the deeper connections to Chris , his father and the punchline, just a few chapters before it was revealed. The premise of genetic destiny was an interesting idea, that was treated too much as a mystery, instead of laying out the premises, and then letting the characterization refute and support the notion. The descriptions felt dated, (granted I read this in 2011). It was an unsatisfying read from many perspectives and was really difficult to get through. What made it worse was that Christopher who turned out to be the key character for many reasons, was about as annoying as you could possibly get. Self defeating, opening his mouth to switch his feet. His final decision was so ridiculous, it almost felt desperate and nothing off his personal problems had been solved to make him a healthier addition to the new community he suddenly joined.
Sadly a lot of near term science fiction has this feel and pace. I gave it 2 stars because it held me for the last 100 pages or so, just when I was about to toss it out. Too much disjointed build up, and in the end, who cares!! I will try the author again, because the premise was worth exploring
Nettale
This is a work to be proud of. Just the right combination of action and character development, with a believable setting at the beginning of the 22nd century. Kube-McDowell chronicles the end of the Diaspora project - an ambitious program to send humanity to nearby star systems. The first ship has already left, and a second of five total is about to leave.
But wait! There's more here than meets the eye. Diaspora project geneticists have discovered that there's a genetic sequence in life that actually calls us to the stars. We no more have choice in the matter than the salmon moving upstream to spawn. The web of human activity unfolding in this engrossing tale is overprinted by a genetic pre-destiny, which drives some to the skies, and others to oppose any such venture.
Ultimately the opposers, lead by the shadowy Jeremiah, succeed in halting the project, but not before the second ship leaves. And behind the backdrop of the personal dramas, earth quietly goes to seed, casting its precious packages to the cosmic winds.
An engrossing tale. Compare this to my review of Hogan's "Cradle of Saturn".
Keramar
The Quiet Pools (1990) by Michael Kube-McDowell - 371 pages - rating: 6/10

Kube has crafted a detailed and plausible picture of the future. His characterizations have depth and honesty. Much of this novel is compelling and intriguing. Only occasionally does his writing style come off as overly verbose or inherently awkward.

Unfortunately he forgot to tell a story. The Quiet Pools is little more than the build up to a sequel that was never written and quite probably never intended. One is forever waiting for this glorious Starship to set sail so that the characters Kube has so vividly painted can be challenged by the dangers of the cosmos and an adventurous undertaking.

The entire book however, is just the build up BEFORE the ship launches. Perhaps I've missed the point. Ultimately the feeling one is left with is that the author has tried to do something different at the expense of failing to tell an interesting story.

Claus Kellermann

2006 May 8

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