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by Liane Merciel

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Author: Liane Merciel
ISBN: 1601254415
Language: English
Pages: 400 pages
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Paizo Publishing, LLC. (July 3, 2012)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: docx rtf txt lrf
FB2 size: 1581 kb | EPUB size: 1833 kb | DJVU size: 1416 kb

From Liane Merciel, critically acclaimed author of The River King's Road and Heaven's Needle, comes a fantastical tale of darkness and redemption set in the award-winning world of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game.

From Liane Merciel, critically acclaimed author of The River King's Road and Heaven's Needle, comes a fantastical tale of darkness and redemption set in the award-winning world of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. Similar books by other authors. The Worldwound Gambit (Pathfinder Tales, book 4) Robin D Laws. City of the Fallen Sky (Pathfinder Tales, book 8) Tim Pratt. Blood of the City (Pathfinder Tales, book 10) Robin D Laws. Winter Witch (Pathfinder Tales, book 2) Elaine Cunningham.

It's not easy to imagine what everyday life would be like in such a foreboding place, but author Liane Merciel does a fantastic job bringing Nidal to life

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). It's not easy to imagine what everyday life would be like in such a foreboding place, but author Liane Merciel does a fantastic job bringing Nidal to life. The book's main character strikes me as a touch bland and (no insult intended!) a bit too much like Drizzt Do'Urden, but on the whole this is an excellent job that adds more depth and range to the official Pathfinder campaign setting of Golarion. We need more clever and original books like this! SPOILERS.

Title: Pathfinder adventure path. III. Series: Pathfinder tales library. Feisal turned the book over with his foot so he wouldn't have to look at its owner's mark.

In the grim nation of Nidal, carefully chosen children are trained to practice dark magic, summoning forth creatures of horror and shadow for the greater glory of the Midnight Lord. Isiem is one such student, a promising young shadowcaster whose budding powers are the envy of his peers. Upon coming of age, he's dispatched on a diplomatic mission to the mountains of the Devil's Perch, where he's meant to assist the armies of devil-worshiping Cheliax in clearing out a tribe of monstrous winged humanoids.

item 1 Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel, Liane, Used; Good Book -Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel . Liane Moriarty Paperback Children's and Young Adults Fiction Books.

item 1 Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel, Liane, Used; Good Book -Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel, Liane, Used; Good Book. item 2 Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel, Liane -Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass, Merciel, Liane. item 3 Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass -Pathfinder Tales: Nightglass. Liane Moriarty Paperback Children's & Young Adults' Books. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Pathfinder Tales book. Embrace the ShadowIn the grim nation of Nidal, carefully chosen. From Liane Merciel, critically acclaimed author of The River King's Road and Heaven's Needle, comes a fantastical tale of darkness and redemption set in the award-winning world of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game.

ew sourceView history. Nightglass, a Pathfinder Tales novel by Liane Merciel, was released in June 2012. An audiobook version narrated by Eric Michael Summerer was released in October 2015. The characters and events precede Merciel's 2014 novel, Nightblade. Nightglass features the following characters: Isiem. For an alphabetical listing of all the relevant terms in this story, please visit its Index.

Liane Merciel's Pathfinder Tales: Hellknight is a thrilling addition to their popular novel series. For devil-blooded Jheraal, even the harshest methods are justified if it means building a better world for her daughter.

Part of the Pathfinder Tales Series). Now, his unique heritage makes him perfect for a dangerous mission into an ancient dungeon said to hold the magical Nightblade, a weapon capable of slaying devils by the thousands and freeing the world of their fiendish taint.

In the grim nation of Nidal, carefully chosen children are trained to practice dark magic, summoning forth creatures of horror and shadow for the greater glory of the Midnight Lord. Isiem is one such student, a promising young shadowcaster whose budding powers are the envy of his peers. Upon coming of age, he's dispatched on a diplomatic mission to the mountains of the Devil's Perch, where he's meant to assist the armies of devil-worshiping Cheliax in clearing out a tribe of monstrous winged humanoids. Yet as the body count rises and Isiem comes face to face with the people he's exterminating, lines begin to blur, and the shadowcaster must ask himself who the real monsters are... From Liane Merciel, critically acclaimed author of The River King's Road and Heaven's Needle, comes a fantastical tale of darkness and redemption set in the award-winning world of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game.
Comments (7)
Grillador
If you like Pathfinder you should enjoy this fantasy novel. Where you get the horrible fantasy kingdom of Nidal, where you follow the protagonist as he gets to go to Wizard School to become a Wizard. Sounds great, but this is Nidal, a country that sold its soul to the deity Zon-Kuthon the Lord of Pain. So instead of seeing him grow you see him holding up while the entire culture tries to grind him into a terrible weapon to help oppress himself, and see his companions react to the ordeal.
Thetalune
This book tells the story of Isiem, a Nidalese wizard with a conscious. Beginning with his education as a wizard in Pangolais and following through his escape from the clutches of Nidalese Empire, the author creates a credible world of fantasy logical in every aspect. Very enjoyable reading.
Tholmeena
Excellant book.....hellraiser meets pathfinder combination was really interesting.....very dark and brooding fist half of book ...... Road to redemption second half all the while keeping it dark and flavorful with a side of shadow.
Fonceiah
This is by far one of the best books in the Pathfinder Tales series I really suggest this if for nothing else for the culture lesson on Shadows and Stryx.
Pruster
I don't usually like novels this dark but this one was beautifully done. Not for younger readers.
Erienan
Love this series of books! Great read
Rare
NO SPOILERS

Nightglass is a Pathfinder Tales novel that's very different than the norm. It's not about adventurers on some sort of quest, but instead a book that traces, from childhood to adulthood, the life of a single individual. The novel is set in the country of Nidal, a dark but fascinating place where the rulers (and, by necessity, most of the people) have dedicated themselves to a god of pain and shadows. It's not easy to imagine what everyday life would be like in such a foreboding place, but author Liane Merciel does a fantastic job bringing Nidal to life. The book's main character strikes me as a touch bland and (no insult intended!) a bit too much like Drizzt Do'Urden, but on the whole this is an excellent job that adds more depth and range to the official Pathfinder campaign setting of Golarion. We need more clever and original books like this!

SPOILERS

The book's main character, Isiem, is taken from his rural village as a child when he shows aptitude for the arcane art of shadowcalling: contacting and manipulating the evil and hungry forces of the shadow plane! The novel follows Isiem's training at Dusk Hall in Nidal's capital city of Pangolais, and we see what a very evil Hogwarts would be like. (There's something in there called Joyful Things--jeepers they're creepy!) The students who survive and progress in their studies at Dusk Hall are eventually initiated into the faith of Zon-Kuthon in a ceremony (the Needled Choir) that is ghastly but a perfect encapsulation and explanation of the faith's tenets. As often as role-playing scenarios are about heroes defeating evil cultists, it's really unusual to see the inner works of those evil faiths.

After being assigned to help (and spy) on a Chelaxian envoy, Isiem starts planning his escape from Nidal. Isiem's character isn't easy to pin down. He takes no joy in the evils deeds he's often asked to do as part of his studies and has no innate respect for the tenets of his faith and government. Yet, although he sometimes tries to curb the worst of their excesses, he's definitely not a heroic type of character. He's a survivor who wants, most of all, to be free--and that's why the comparison to Drizzt's escape from the Drow strikes me as an apt comparison.

The second half of the book shifts to a remote town in Cheliax called Crackspike where silver has recently been discovered. Isiem is sent with a contingent of Hellknights (because Nidal cooperates with Cheliax by making its shadowcallers available to them) to pacify the birdlike strix that have been warring with the miners. The novel shows great insight (and adds worldlore) for the strix, creatures I haven't encountered in much Pathfinder fiction. After the strix overrun Crackspike, Isiem becomes their ally because he showed mercy to one of their warriors during the battle. He helps the strix in a later battle against Chelaxian reinforcements, and helps to negotiate a peace treaty between the two forces. It's an odd and unpredictable turn of events for the character, and although it ties into his freedom from Nidal, I'm sure if it fits the theme of the book as well. Nidal is such an interesting place that I'd rather see more of it than follow the life of one of its escapees.

Despite the review ending on a bit of a down note, Nightglass is an excellent novel and definitely worth reading. It has single-handedly turned a particular aspect of Golarion from an interesting idea to a fully fleshed-out and believable place, which is no small feat.
I absolutely loved this book on my first read through. On my second, I could see more of it's problems, but still really enjoyed it. There's a massive tone-change between parts 1 and 2 that might be jarring, but on the whole it was good. The authors is amazing at description and weaves her words well enough that it's not difficult to get sucked in to the dark beauty of Nidal, though it is far from a happy place.

As a word of caution, there is some disturbing material, and good portion of it happens to children between 8-15, though it's only particularly difficult to read in one chapter. The actual torture is never described, just the after-effects. And I personally don't think it's gratuitous for this setting, merely making a point about the country's culture.