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by Cecilia Dart-Thornton

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Author: Cecilia Dart-Thornton
ISBN: 0330433024
Language: English
Pages: 496 pages
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Macmillan Publishers Ltd; New Ed edition (2006)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: mbr rtf doc txt
FB2 size: 1237 kb | EPUB size: 1960 kb | DJVU size: 1994 kb

Cecilia Dart-Thornton is an Australian author of fantasy novels, notably the Bitterbynde Trilogy. The Bitterbynde Trilogy follows the journey of a mute, amnesiac foundling through a world of beauty and peril.

Cecilia Dart-Thornton is an Australian author of fantasy novels, notably the Bitterbynde Trilogy. The Ill-Made Mute (2001). The Lady of the Sorrows (2002). The Battle of Evernight (2003). A four-part epic fantasy describing the adventures that befall a cursed and gifted family. The Iron Tree (2005). The Well of Tears (2005).

The Well of Tears book. Cecilia Dart-Thornton was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology

The Well of Tears book. Cecilia Dart-Thornton was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology. She started and ran her own business, but became a full-time writer in 2000 after her work was 'discovered' on the Internet and publi Cecilia Dart-Thornton was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology.

The Well of Tears: Book Two of The Crowthistle Chronicles. Cecilia Dart-Thornton. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on February 10, 2012.

Together they encounter marvels and misfortunes and discover that the key to all their riddles ultimately lies with the extraordinary Well of Tears.

Cecilia Dart-Thornton. Together they encounter marvels and misfortunes and discover that the key to all their riddles ultimately lies with the extraordinary Well of Tears. Books by Cecilia Dart-Thornton. The Lady of the Sorrows. The Battle of Evernight. Books in the The Crowthistle Chronicles series.

At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Cecilia Dart-Thornton's interests include playing music, oil painting, graphic design, photography, and clay sculpture.

Jewel, the daughter of Jarred and Lilith and the last of the line of infamous sorcerer Janus Jaravhor, grows up without a care until her parents' sudden death forces her and her uncle to flee their. Cecilia Dart-Thornton's interests include playing music, oil painting, graphic design, photography, and clay sculpture. She lives in Australia. Библиографические данные.

Cecilia Dart-Thornton is the author of numerous bestselling fantasy novels, notably the Bitterbynde Trilogy. The Crowthistle Chronicles THE WELL OF TEARS Jewel has grown up surrounded by peace and love in abundance

Cecilia Dart-Thornton is the author of numerous bestselling fantasy novels, notably the Bitterbynde Trilogy. The Washington Post reported that the first summer after Neilsen Booktrack launched in Australia it showed Dart-Thornton’s newly launched fantasy tome The Ill-Made Mute hitting the Herald's best-seller list, ranked next to mainstream authors and 'serious' fiction. Technology, in one swift blow, destroyed a decades-long publishers' bias against fantasy. The Crowthistle Chronicles THE WELL OF TEARS Jewel has grown up surrounded by peace and love in abundance. But her world is cruelly shattered when disaster strikes, and she is forced to flee.

Cecilia Dart-Thornton was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts . The Iron Tree (2004) The Well of Tears (2005) Weatherwitch (2006) Fallowblade (2007).

Cecilia Dart-Thornton was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, graduating from Monash University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology. She started and ran her own business, but became a full-time writer in 2000 after her work was 'discovered' on the Internet and published by Time Warner (New York).

Comments (6)
Survivors
I don't remember the first book being so tedious. Was a long time ago. This one drove me crazy with the descriptions and lists. The characters didn't draw me in, I wasn't attached to them. The weights are very colorful and interesting; good imagination, there.
Tto
Better than the first book, still find myself glazing over large parts. More happening in this book, just enough to keep interested.
Livina
I'm intrigued that anyone could get to the end of this book. I'm at page 91 and haven't read a book this boring in many many years. The writing is far too descriptive and wordy and a plot is difficult, if not impossible, to find. The writer constantly repeats the underlying background, the heroine (if that is what she should be called) is bland. I have been able to develop no feeling for her at all, in fact, I wish she and not her uncle had been taken by the unseelies. The authors overuse of the word like made me skip many sections of the text and remember, I've only read 91 pages. I'm not likely to finish or if I do I suspect page after page will be skipped. All in all the book seems to be about a young girl with no personality and who cannot be injured, looking for her roots. Her lack of personality makes you not want to care about her, and her invulnerability removes any tension that should be built from the unseelies and other not-so-nice characters. Don't waste your money on this one.
Jairani
In Slievmordhu, Jewel lives a wonderful life showered with love from her family until King Maolmordha's troopers kill her parents. Unbeknownst to Jewel, her savior, Step-Uncle Eoin feels remorse for causing this tragedy all because he was jealous of her father Jarred for being married to the woman he loved Lilith. Knowing he placed his beloved niece in danger, Eoin takes her on a perilous journey through the Great Marsh praying he can get her to safety in the nearby kingdom of Narngalis. He has yet to tell her that he revealed to the king's minion that she and her father were the last descendents of the feared sorcerer Janus, making her a pawn to open the Dome of Strang where the wizard's powerful secrets lie.

Eleven days looking over their shoulders, the wayfarers struggle until they clear the marsh. However, deadly unseelie wights capture Eoin. Jewel seeks refuge at High Darioneth where she meets the weathermasters and the Storm Lord Avalloc Maelstronnar-Stormbringer. She soon learns that Eoin is dead and finds solace with the people of High Darioneth until she learns that no one guards the Dome of Strang so decides it is time to learn about her roots.

THE WELL OF TEARS, the second entry in the Crowthistle Chronicles (see THE IRON TREE starring Jarred and Lilith), is a fabulous coming of age fantasy starring a wonderful heroine whose world is destroyed by the betrayal of a loved one. Eoin is an intriguing character though his time in the tale is short as the audience feels his ignominy of what he wrought. The story line is character driven with Jewel the focus of a fine fantasy quest to find out what truly flows in her blood.

Harriet Klausner
POFOD
I am a huge fan of CDT, but this book is just STUPID. You really see how much trouble she has with plotting in this sequel that fails for so many reasons.

I love the way she weaves all the fantasy into the story, but the plot here is so boring and has all been done before, ie the search for the fountain of youth...PLEASE!

Characters come and go and we are left with the god-like Jewel with her saphire eyes and some other guy who's name escapes me. I could not get interested in their travels or care much really for either of them as they were impervious to harm and seemingly invincible. Other characters were so insignificant they are just little blips in the story and you end up getting confused with who is who and why they are there and what's the point and so on.

I just had to stop reading it as i was bored to tears. I love her detailed descriptions of things, but this time it just annoyed me and i was skimming over them to hurry up and see if there would be some sort of plot at the end of them.

Maybe it would have got better, but after about 350 pages of nothing much happening at all I realise i'm glad i just borrowed this one rather than buying it.
Wizard
instead of buying it! I re-read parts of Book One, The Iron Tree, so I would be "up to date" on this sequel. I must admit that I didn't like the main character, Jewel, at all. I don't see why whatshisname (the guy that married her) liked her either. The book began to drag when they started their journeying together, and I must admit I started out skipping pages, then whole chapters, then all the way to the end to at least see how it turned out. I didn't feel any of the fascination that I had with The Iron Tree.

Of course with all that skipping I may have missed something vital that could have resulted in a better feeling about the book.