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by Chris Bunch

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Author: Chris Bunch
ISBN: 1857234901
Language: English
Pages: 624 pages
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Time Warner Books Uk; New Ed edition (April 1998)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lit rtf lrf doc
FB2 size: 1130 kb | EPUB size: 1921 kb | DJVU size: 1227 kb

THE SEER KING CHRIS BUNCH a division of F+W Media, Inc. for Kuo-Yu Liang & Russ Galen who helped a lot and, again, mostly for Li’l Karen Contents Cover. a division of F+W Media, Inc.

THE SEER KING CHRIS BUNCH a division of F+W Media, Inc. for Kuo-Yu Liang. who helped a lot. and, again, mostly for. Li’l Karen.

1 The Seer King Trilogy. Hal is away from his home country and his king, Asir. The third book covers life after the war, the difficulties ex-soldiers face, and how Hal deals with it.

1943-12-22)22 December 1943 Fresno, California. 1 The Seer King Trilogy. 2 Dragonmaster Trilogy. When war breaks out, he is drafted into the army as an unwilling soldier. However, he does his best and works his way through the ranks of the army and society with his heroic exploits.

THE SEER KING by Chris Bunch is a recommendation to me by Steven Caldwell of The Bookwyrm Reader. The book is full of action, twists, and turns which were all entertaining. I admit I wasn't sure what to make of it because I hadn't read any of Chris Bunch's other works but I'm now determined to read all of his fantasy as well as science fiction novels. It's also thoroughly unsympathetic to the human race in general with the revolutionaries, the establishment, and everyone caught in-between all having their darker sides. I liked the homages to the British Empire, India, and other locations in addition to the Roman elements too.

a division of F+W Media, Inc. The clean parts are for. Judine. And the rest is for. Terry. But as the ships approached the tiny port below my fortress prison, they made certain signals, and my jailers relaxed. The ships were from Nicias, sent by the Grand Council.

Not only had we saved the lives of the courtiers and the achim himself from some terrible rending, but we’d killed the traitorous Jask Irshad and the rebel’s most evil brother, Chamisso Fergana.

Not only had we saved the lives of the courtiers and the achim himself from some terrible rending, but we’d killed the traitorous Jask Irshad and the rebel’s most evil brother, Chamisso Fergana or the demon Thak, Achim Fergana was unconcerned. With no one to guide him, even if that powerful spell the ever-brave and raised resident-general and Most Powerful Seer Laish Tenedos cast hadn’t, Thak must now be impotent and would soon return to his own dark realms. Similarly, the dreaded Tovieti, without any leaders, would fragment and disappear as if they’d.

Chris Bunch became a full-time novelist following his twenty-year career as a television writer. A military veteran, he was the Locus bestselling author of student popular works as the Sten series, The Seer King, The Demon King, and the Last Legion series. He passed away in 2005. Библиографические данные. The Seer King: Book One of the Seer King Trilogy Prologue Books.

Flawed but made up with it's intensity. I read this two years ago and have yet to find a book with the same great combo of sword, sorcery, passion and yes, sex scenes. Bunch scores big in my book. My only complaint is that his next two books fall short maybe due to my "high" expectations.

The Seer King, Emperor Laish Tenedos, is dead. A courier brought the word this morning, and the prison warden declared a holiday. I suppose I should not have called him that, but rather the Prisoner Tenedos, just as I am no longer Damastes a Cimabue, no longer Damastes the Fair as some called me in the silken pavilions of Nicias, no longer First Tribune a Cimabue, Baron Damastes of Ghazi, but merely the Prisoner Damastes. I knew what tidings the ship bore, even before it docked from its gay buntings and the cheers of my guards as they read the signal.

THE SEER KING is the first part in a major new fantasy trilogy in the vein of Raymond Feist and David Gemmell. It begins the epic drama of a wizard-emperor, the kingdom he rises to lead and then almost destroy, and the men who served him and the women who loved him. The wizard is Laish Tenedos, a man who despises the fragmented kingdom of Numantia, and is determined to bring it back to its former glory - with himself on the throne. His best friend, and the teller of this tale, is Damastes a Cimabue, his bravest officer and most skilled cavalryman. Together they will fight magic and demon-led conspiracy in their struggle to bring peace to Numantia and Damastes will not only rise to the highest ranks of command, but will find the heights - and depths - of love.
Comments (7)
Priotian
This is the opening volume of a war-with-swords-and-magic trilogy, taking place in a somewhat stripped-down world with Roman-empire military technology and also magic and demons.
Let me take care of the sex scenes issue up front. An earlier reviewer was right on the mark when he compared them to "Letters to Penthouse", except, to be precise, they're more like "Letters to Penthouse Variations" in their systematic kinkiness. And they're not there to develop the character or the plot, either. You go along for 50 pages of plot, and then you get a ten page kinky sex scene, sort of like beer commercials in the middle of a football game. I've never seen anything quite like it. It's weird. Well, you can take that as a plus or a minus, it's up to you.
Basically this trilogy is all about war, civil and otherwise. The protagonist, Damastes a Cimabue, is discovered in prison at the beginning of Volume I, expecting to die, penning his reflections on the rise and fall of his career as the friend, tool, and dupe of Tenedos, mage-emperor of Numantia. (Don't get too discouraged, though, that isn't really how the trilogy ends.)
Numantia is an empire which has no emperor, is ruled by a committee, and is unraveling into its component kingdoms. Or so it is when Damastes encounters the Seer (really mage) Tenedos, who has some big ideas but no batallions. Since the book is called "The Seer King", I don't think I'm giving anyway any deep secrets by telling you that through his tactical and strategic abilities Damastes is able to help Tenedos realize some or all of these ideas.
Bunch maintains a lot of energy and is mostly convincing when he is writing about military campaigns, relationships among officers and men, victories, defeats, miserable retreats through lousy terrain, the effects of war on the civilian populace, and so on.
On the minus side, the social-science side of things is pretty weak. In essence this is a world with two empires in it (and some border terrain). There are supposedly some other kingdoms somewhere, but you never find out anything about them. A lot of subject areas just haven't been explored well, such as oceanic trade, supplying the capital city with food, the economic system, the religious infrastructure (you learn about some of the gods, but are there scriptures? disputes? etc.), history, political philosophy, and intellectual pursuits in general. The level of civilization is somewhere between imperial Rome and 17th-century London, but nobody ever reads or writes a book (or scroll).
A huge and powerful secret society of assassins appears, being a sect of demon-worshipers in volume 1, a worker-artisan-peasant alliance in volume 2, and millenarians of some kind in volume 3. And they manage to do this without any aboveground propaganda, organization, etc. Take it from me, it's not that easy to organize even an ordinary secret society, let alone one in which all the thousands of members are fanatical assassins! Of course this is a reflection of Bunch's Viet Nam experience, but it suggests that he never really understood Viet Nam. People don't become VC-style militants just out of mob instinct, without the effects of the social, political, and cultural context.
These things may seem nitpicky, but in my book you have to at least think about these things some to get more than 3 stars.
Then there is the magic. Now, some of it is pretty cool. I kind of like the incantations, with their vague and suggestive wording. And there is some interesting use of substances, like expanding skillets, one boat turned into many boats, that sort of thing.
But when you sit down and try to make sense of it, you start to realize that Bunch has sort of skated over some of the problems. For example, how come nobody else has figured out how to do the stuff that Tenedos does? Is it just that he has more "mana" than anyone ever had in the history of the world before? Or fewer scruples? How come he doesn't use one good spell over and over again, instead of having to create something original for each battle? Although it is crystal clear by the end of Volume 1 that "Great Spells" and the use of demons are as powerful as tactical nukes, how come this has no effect on the organization of armies, states, etc.? How come everyone just organizes for battle the same way as "always", sort of hoping the enemy's next Great Spell won't kill too many thousand? Doesn't technological development induce social change?
Well, that's the sort of thing Bunch would have to address better than he does before he would get top marks from me. Furthermore, since you're going to want to read all 3 books, I think it makes sense to rate the trilogy as a unit. This means that the whole trilogy suffers from the fact that Damastes is so willfully ignorant throughout Volume 2, which I consider to be another defect. However, three stars is not a bad rating in my book.
Landarn
THE SEER KING by Chris Bunch is a recommendation to me by Steven Caldwell of The Bookwyrm Reader. I admit I wasn't sure what to make of it because I hadn't read any of Chris Bunch's other works but I'm now determined to read all of his fantasy as well as science fiction novels. This is an excellent Game of Thrones-esque novel with twists, turns, and politics behind it. It's also designed to be more Rome versus Middle Ages and that's a nice change of pace from the typical way these things are handled.

The premise is a young calvarymen, Damastes, in the setting's equivalent of Rome gets himself assigned to an awful job because of showing up a superior officer. This introduces him to the wizard-General Tenedos. Tenedos has an ambition to take over the corrupt and decaying Rule of Ten before instituting a dictatorship over the country. With Tenedos' help, Damastes rises through the ranks beyond anything a poor country knight could have but also becomes more and more integral to Tenedos' plans.

Much of the story is following Damastes as he deals with the trials and tribulations of being a soldier for the Roman-esque legion he belongs to. This includes occupying a territory which despises him, managing a unit of unruly nobles, and eventually dealing with a civil uprising. I found his insights into everything quite fascinating and enjoyable throughout. You really get a sense of how this man fits into his larger society both good and bad.

I should warn readers that this book is full of sex from beginning to end. Damastes claims not to be a man prone to bragging but a large chunk of it segways into his relationship with local women, noblewomen he's had affairs with, and the fact many women send him pictures or miniature sculptures of them nude (among other talismens). I think it fit him as a character and one of his later relationships was actually sweet but others might be bothered by this.

The book is full of action, twists, and turns which were all entertaining. It's also thoroughly unsympathetic to the human race in general with the revolutionaries, the establishment, and everyone caught in-between all having their darker sides. I liked the homages to the British Empire, India, and other locations in addition to the Roman elements too.

Should you buy this book? I think so, definitely.