» » The Harsh Cry of the Heron: The Last Tale of the Otori (Tales of the Otori, Book 4)

Download The Harsh Cry of the Heron: The Last Tale of the Otori (Tales of the Otori, Book 4) fb2

by Lian Hearn

Download The Harsh Cry of the Heron: The Last Tale of the Otori (Tales of the Otori, Book 4) fb2
Author: Lian Hearn
ISBN: 1594482578
Language: English
Pages: 572 pages
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Riverhead Books; 1st edition (June 5, 2007)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: azw lit lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1893 kb | EPUB size: 1825 kb | DJVU size: 1722 kb

The Tales of the Otori were supposed to be a trilogy, and should NEVER have become a tetralogy. This fourth instalment was probably written under the publisher's pressure due to the success of the first three, but Lian Hearn ran out of ideas.

The Tales of the Otori were supposed to be a trilogy, and should NEVER have become a tetralogy. All she does in this book is some filling-up, some mental acrobatics and some not believable plot twists.

Tales of the Otori is a series of historical fantasy novels by Gillian Rubinstein, writing under the pen name Lian Hearn, set in a fictional world based on feudal Japan. The series initially consisted of a trilogy: Across the Nightingale Floor (2002), Grass for His Pillow (2003), and Brilliance of the Moon (2004). It was followed in 2006 by a sequel, The Harsh Cry of the Heron, and in 2007 by a prequel, Heaven's Net is Wide.

Welcome to the Tales of the Otori. Fortunately, the writing is beautiful and the imagery wonderful. 15 years have passed since the events of the last book. Takeo and Kaede have three daughters, Shigeko and the twins Miki and Maya. Just be prepared for bloodthirsty Japanese soap-opera. Due to superstitions regarding twins as well as Miki and Maya showing many of the Tribe gifts, the two girls are shunned - even by their own mother which made me hate Kaede. As Shigeko is the oldest, she is trained in battle.

Hearn's Otori series is the best (and only) literary .

Hearn's Otori series is the best (and only) literary expression of a cultural phenomenon that has swept through cinema (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), comics (manga), and popular culture at large. And, with this book, Hearn delivers in full ninja vs. samurai fashion the kinetic, simultaneously heartbreaking and uplifting resolution that the Otori's hundreds of thousands of fans richly deserve-whose epic satisfaction will surely draw even more readers into the fold. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail.

The Last Tale of the Otori. Otori Takeo heard his daughter’s voice clearly as she called to her sisters from within the residence at Inuyama castle, in the same way he heard all the mingled sounds of the castle and the town beyond

The Last Tale of the Otori. Otori Takeo heard his daughter’s voice clearly as she called to her sisters from within the residence at Inuyama castle, in the same way he heard all the mingled sounds of the castle and the town beyond.

Электронная книга "The Harsh Cry of the Heron: The Last Tale of the Otori", Lian Hearn. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Harsh Cry of the Heron: The Last Tale of the Otori" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The last 300 or 350 pages were more like the old series. Lian Hearn could have pretty much cut out the first part of the book. It was straight action and made us feel what the characters felt during their encounters.

Like Hearns last tale. Like Hearn's last tale of the Otori, beautifully written but ultimately unfulfilling. The world Takeo inhabits is vivid, sensual, and utterly alive.

Lian Hearn is the pseudonym for the writer Gillian Rubinstein, currently living in Australia, who has a lifelong interest in. .

Lian Hearn is the pseudonym for the writer Gillian Rubinstein, currently living in Australia, who has a lifelong interest in Japan, has lived there, and speaks Japanese. Don't miss the related series, The Tale of Shikanoko.

The Harsh Cry of the Heron is the fourth book in the Tales of the Otori series by Lian Hearn. Don't miss the related series, The Tale of Shikanoko. A dazzling epic of warfare and sacrifice, passionate revenge, treacherous betrayal, and unconquerable love, The Harsh Cry of the Heron takes the storytelling achievement of Lian Hearn's fantastic medieval Japanese world to startling new heights of drama and action. Fifteen years of peace and prosperity under the rule of Lord Otori Takeo and his wife Kaede is threatened by a rogue network of assassins, the resurgence of old rivalries, the arrival of foreigners bearing new weapons and religion, and an unfulfilled prophecy that Lord Takeo will die at the hand of a member of his own family. The Harsh Cry of the Heron is the rich and stirring finale to a series whose imaginative vision has enthralled millions of readers worldwide, and an extraordinary novel that stands as a thrilling achievement in its own right.
Comments (7)
one life
I was a little disappointed with this novel, though I loved the three originals. The author rushed it... The most interesting parts were glossed over. SPOILERS SPOILERS I was bored with Takeo and highly disappointed by Kaede. I wish the author had instead focused the chapters on the daughters' abilities, increased the romance between the eldest daughter and the senior retainer, and spent a LOT more time focusing on the son and his ghost master ability, by leaving Kenji alive or something to teach him, or having Kenji's ghost teach him? There was just SO much potential and so many loose ends. Super disappointing. It had all the teasing elements to be an amazing story, I don't know what happened -- it just rushed to the end. Hearn's editor really failed her.
Alianyau
The book needed a reference to keep up with all of the characters, it was a bloated read full of build up and then the end was too abrupt. I actually flipped back over pages to see if I'd somehow skipped over a chapter. It was if she realized she'd gone over her word allotment and had to cut things short and so she just 'told' us what happened instead of 'showing' us in the story. Almost like something a narrator would do to speed things along. The ending was a huge disappointment and certainly not a happy finish.
Beazezius
This was a replacement copy for one (the last book of the Otori Series) that I gave away. I have already read it more than once and am sure that I will want to again.
Adokelv
I entirely agree with what "Avid Reader" wrote in the first review of this book, quote: "All I can say is that if you liked the first three books in the Tales Of The Otori... leave it there. Let that be the end, and that is what Lian Hearn should have done also." The reviewer from "Book List" gave it a good write-up, that's marred by the fact she gets some of the main characters' names wrong (she mixes up Arai and Akio for example). I wonder whether she actually read the book.

The Tales of the Otori were supposed to be a trilogy, and should NEVER have become a tetralogy. This fourth instalment was probably written under the publisher's pressure due to the success of the first three, but Lian Hearn ran out of ideas. All she does in this book is some filling-up, some mental acrobatics and some not believable plot twists. As "Avid Reader" said, she manages to make you hate people you used to love, starting with Kaede who's such a likeable person, strong, smart, resilient and understanding in the first three books and, in just a few short pages, becomes an irrational shrew, not to mention a betrayer of both her husband and her people - Her second turnabout and her fate at the very end are psychologically and politically incomprehensible. Some of the plot twists make no sense whatsoever, and the way the prophecy about Takeo's death is fulfilled is just plain cheating. Not to mention that the reason he dies for is nonsensical. Takeo (who, like his adopted father Shigeru, has this deplorable habit of sparing his enemies' lives when he has them at his mercy, but is a strong warrior and a good ruler) becomes this wishy-washy guy, totally undone by... well, not to give too much away, by the result of his aforementioned leniency towards his enemies.

The only good thing in the book is the deep but doomed love between Shigeko and Hiroshi, the only characters I could still like and sympathize with. (I also liked one of the twins, Miki, though her sister Maya gave me the shivers.) This book made me despise Takeo and hate Kaede, and wish I'd stayed with the end of "Brilliance of the Moon" and never bought this fourth book.

The fifth book, however, which tells Shigeru's story before he rescued and adopted Takeo, brings the series into a nice circle - it ends where the first book begins, and it is both interesting and satisfying, but that's a subject for a different review.

My advice is, read the first three books, skim quickly through the fourth if you feel you must, then read the fifth. After doing so myself (I mean reading the fifth book), I re-read the first three again, and enjoyed them all over again. But I did not, and will never, reread "The Harsh Cry of the Heron". Hiroshi and Shigeko notwithstanding, I'm sorry I read it at all in the first place. It ruined everything for me, which is why I reread the first three, just to (figuratively) take the bad taste out of my mouth.

The two stars I gave it are for Hiroshi and Shigeko, and also in memory of how much I enjoyed the original trilogy.
Gindian
This shouldn't have been the last book in the series. The ending was rushed. There was so much left of the story to tell.
I wasn't ready for it to be over.
Over all it was a good story, just wish there was more.
Dishadel
The book was very hard to put down. A lot of research went into finding the traditional steps of the history during that period of time. Exciting ending with emotional words tied together.
Ariseym
All four of the series were terrific but this last one was the best. It was thrilling to see how the end was reached. It would make a great movie.
I have read all 4 and this one is as good as the rest. excellent series. I admire the depth of research involved in a good period novel