» » The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better

Download The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better fb2

by Thomas Parrish

Download The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better fb2
Author: Thomas Parrish
ISBN: 0471223832
Language: English
Pages: 192 pages
Category: Words Language & Grammar
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (October 8, 2002)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: azw lrf txt lrf
FB2 size: 1980 kb | EPUB size: 1836 kb | DJVU size: 1446 kb
Sub: Reference

If so, you're not alone. Some of the most prominent professionals in TV broadcasting and at major newspapers and magazines-people who really should know better-are guilty of making all-too-common grammatical errors.

The Grouchy Grammarian book. The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better. Although I did learn from The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better by Thomas Parrish, I feel it could have been written in a way that I could learn more.

and Others Who Should Know Better - Thomas Parrish Work. Parrish and his fictional friend expose the 47 most common mistakes in English, many of which are made by those who should know better.

The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-not-to Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters and Others Who Should Know Better - Thomas Parrish Work. Check out whether you’ve been getting it right.

This book looked promising – it was subtitled A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English . However, I wasn't much further into the book before I realised it was actually full of unsupported assertions that even a beginning grammarian like me could see were dubious.

This book looked promising – it was subtitled A How-Not-To Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters, and Others Who Should Know Better – and in the first few pages I came across a passage referring to that group: What did these people study in high school and college? Headline writing? Advertising techniques? No English, no history? . Pettiness arises early in the piece.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Try another ZIP code. Delivering to. Now-FREE NextDay delivery. Same Every Day Low Prices. With red pen in hand, Parrish's fictional friend the Grouchy Grammarian leads the charge, examining the forty-seven most common mistakes in English and imparting the basics of good grammar with a charming mixture of fussiness and common sense.

The Grouchy Grammarian: A How-not-to Guide to the 47 Most Common Mistakes in English Made by Journalists, Broadcasters and Others Who Should Know Better by Thomas Parrish (Hardback, 2002).

Using examples of errors found in major newspapers, magazines, and TV broadcasts, the Grammarian explains basic elements of grammar and good writing that many of our foremost journalists (and the rest of us) occasionally forget.

Do you commit apostrophe atrocities?Are you tormented by the lie/lay conundrum?Do you find yourself stuck between floaters and danglers?Do your subjects and your verbs refuse to agree?If so, you're not alone. Some of the most prominent professionalsin TV broadcasting and at major newspapers and magazines-people whoreally should know better-are guilty of making all-too-commongrammatical errors. In this delightfully amusing, clever guide,Thomas Parrish points out real-life grammar gaffes from top-notchpublications such as the New York Times and the New Yorker toillustrate just how widespread these errors are. With red pen inhand, Parrish's fictional friend the Grouchy Grammarian leads thecharge, examining the forty-seven most common mistakes in Englishand imparting the basics of good grammar with a charming mixture offussiness and common sense. All of which makes The GrouchyGrammarian the most entertaining, accessible how-not-to guideyou'll ever read.
Comments (7)
Feri
I read through it once and I'll refer back to it. I enjoyed examples and the clarity with which the information was presented.
Landaron
I love this book and take it out to read a few pages every week or so. But then, I'm an English major. It tackles all my favorite (read "most irritating") mistakes of grammar. It's always good to know you're not the only grouchy grammarian in the world. When I read it, I feel as though I'm in group therapy.
Hanad
This was sent as a gift and i have not read the book, but understand it is very funny with sound grammatical instructions.
Akelevar
Not as interesting as I thought it would be. there were a few things in common that made me smile.

Shirley De Lorme
Unsoo
If you've ever struggled with the proper placement of an apostrophe, or the usage of "lie" or "lay", or the difference between "compliment" and "complement", this book is for you. Most English-speaking people can't speak English. Perhaps they slept through every single English class they took. Perhaps they just don't care. It's written in a very humorous, readable style that will keep you interested rather than putting you to sleep. And with all the examples of atrocious grammatical errors, it will show people just how ridiculous they sound when they can't be bothered to get it right. Every chapter has something in it that will at least get a giggle out of you. I found it especially amusing after reading his numerous bashings of editors and proofreaders, to find that his own proofreader apparently wasn't paying too much attention on page 131. This book should be required reading for anyone who speaks English and for those that only think they do. Read it, learn it, and apply it. If it doesn't actually make you smarter, at least it will make you sound smarter.
Nten
In "The Grouchy Grammarian," historian and long-time editor Thomas Parrish offers an easy-to-read, informational, entertaining and blithesome reference filled with advice on how to avoid 47 of the most common mistakes in English grammar.
Each topic is covered in a short chapter with a handy summary at the end for quick check-ups, and each is humorously presented through the point of view of the author's alter ego, The Grouch, a clever, witty, and very opinionated fictional curmudgeon who is a self-proclaimed guardian of grammar and calls errors "infelicities to be corrected."
Not only will The Grouch teach you the rules of grammar, usage and good writing, reinforcing his point by ruthlessly citing real-life examples of grammatical gaffes, careless errors, and basic mistakes taken from the blunders of some of today's best-known newspapers, magazines, and TV broadcasts, he will also make your learning experience enjoyable by having you laugh, chuckle or at least smile at his passionate remarks and his quixotic personality.
As a bonus, for those who wish to go deeper into the subject, the book includes a vast bibliography, and a thorough index for quick consultations.
Overall, this is an excellent resource that combines narrative and reference to help you learn or review the elements of precise writing that are most often forgotten, also throwing in for good measure some general and common sense advice on writing.
--Reviewed by M. E. Volmar
Yadon
"The Grouchy Grammarian" is not a grouchy book. Parrish's fictional curmudgeon limits his irritation to public figures and national media outlets for spreading grammatical errors and "infelicities" throughout the populace. Parrish constructively channels his alter-ego's concerns, and the result is enlightening rather than chastening. Among usage guides, this one is particularly helpful for three reasons:
1) Each topic is covered in a short chapter, and each chapter ends with a summary so you can learn a lot quickly.
2) Parrish includes a thorough index, and a thoughtful annotated bibliography of guides to language, writing and usage.
3) Parrish clearly explains why usage glitches are glitches. Now that I understand what NOT to do, I don't have to laboriously memorize rules about what to do. Rote memorization of grammar rules never worked for me--I resemble the student in "Up the Down Staircase" who complains that "semicolons don't stick to my head."
I wish all people who worry about "weak", "watery" assaults upon English had mediators like Parrish to absorb their ire and deftly convey their championship and knowledge of precise language.
Contrary to the title, this book is not some esoteric grammar book. It it a way to help you express your thoughts in writing and speech without redundancy or embarassing common errors. The writer is very reasonable and modern, not some old man just complaining about the demise of proper English, but someone truly attempting to help journalists, broadcatsers, and everyone avoid some of the simplest, but most common, mistakes made. You will also enjoy the humorous examples from the AP and New York Times.
P.S.: slightly short on correct examples or full explanations sometimes, but still a 5 STAR BOOK and a MUST-READ for anyone