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by Christine L. Williams

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Author: Christine L. Williams
ISBN: 0520247175
Language: English
Pages: 264 pages
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (January 9, 2006)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lit doc mobi rtf
FB2 size: 1407 kb | EPUB size: 1920 kb | DJVU size: 1427 kb
Sub: Politics

In this brilliant book Williams lays bare the social complexities of shopping for toys in America. She describes how shopping and working in toy stores are shaped by race, class and gender, and how children are taught how to consume.

In this brilliant book Williams lays bare the social complexities of shopping for toys in America. This is sociology at its best-laying bare the intricate nature of everyday life, showing us how the world can be different and better, all the while documenting the human drama that swirls around us. This book will change the way you shop, and the way you think about consumerism, inequality and the nature of 21st century American life.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality.

Home Browse Books Book details, Inside Toyland: Working . Despite their differences, Williams finds that both toy stores perpetuate social inequality in a variety of ways.

Home Browse Books Book details, Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social. Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality. By Christine L. Williams. I got my first job working in a toy store when I was 41 years ol. So begins sociologist Christine Williams's description of her stint as a low-wage worker at two national toy store chains: one upscale shop and one big box outlet.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

I got my first job working in a toy store when I was 41 years ol. .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. In this provocative, perceptive, and lively book, studded with rich observations from the shop floor, Williams chronicles her experiences as a cashier, salesperson, and stocker and provides broad-ranging, often startling, insights into the social impact of shopping for toys.

Shopping for toys can sometimes reproduce social inequality in the most obvious way. Firstly, the shoppers who are mostly white women feel privileged and always except notions of &.

118+ million publications.

Williams was one of four white women on the staff.

Canadian Journal of Sociology Online March-April 2007 Christine L. Williams Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality University of California Press, 2006, 256pp. Williams was one of four white women on the staff. In Inside Toyland, Williams does not simply provide a narrow analysis of the labour process and working conditions - the makeup of the McJobs - within the retail sector.

Williams, Christine . and Catherine Connell. Looking good and sounding right: Aesthetic labor and social inequality in the retail industry. Work and Occupations 37:349-77. Williams, Christine . and Patti Giuffre. She previously served as chair of the ASA sections on Sex and Gender, and Work, Occupations, and Organizations. at UCLA on September 23, 2015 ga. agepub.

"I got my first job working in a toy store when I was 41 years old." So begins sociologist Christine Williams's description of her stint as a low-wage worker at two national toy store chains: one upscale shop and one big box outlet. In this provocative, perceptive, and lively book, studded with rich observations from the shop floor, Williams chronicles her experiences as a cashier, salesperson, and stocker and provides broad-ranging, often startling, insights into the social impact of shopping for toys. Taking a new look at what selling and buying for kids are all about, she illuminates the politics of how we shop, exposes the realities of low-wage retail work, and discovers how class, race, and gender manifest and reproduce themselves in our shopping-mall culture. Despite their differences, Williams finds that both toy stores perpetuate social inequality in a variety of ways. She observes that workers are often assigned to different tasks and functions on the basis of gender and race; that racial dynamics between black staff and white customers can play out in complex and intense ways; that unions can't protect workers from harassment from supervisors or demeaning customers even in the upscale toy store. And she discovers how lessons that adults teach to children about shopping can legitimize economic and social hierarchies. In the end, however, Inside Toyland is not an anticonsumer diatribe. Williams discusses specific changes in labor law and in the organization of the retail industry that can better promote social justice.
Comments (7)
NI_Rak
Super interesting. Was a breeze to read in class
Quynaus
This is almost like two books mashed up into one. The bulk of it is a Marxian feminist analysis of class, gender, and economic dynamics of the retail industry (especially Big Box retailing.) But the more memorable part of this book is her trenchant field notes of her own experiences as a retail clerk.

William's experience echoes those of Barbara Ehrenreich's in "Nickel and Dimed" and "Bait and Switch." Williams didn't have to go as far underground as Ehrenreich did: she just went ahead and stated that she was a college teacher who found herself in need of a McJob. (The stores didn't look very deeply into her background anyway: in fact, both the places which hired her sent her to an employee orientation session the next day.) The two stores she worked at were described under the pseudonyms, "Toy Warehouse" and the more pretentious "Diamond Toys." Toy Warehouse is a very thinly designed Toys R Us (where I myself worked a few Christmases ago): aside from the pseudonym, the only detail she changed was the color of her smock (orange in the book, red in real life.) I am not sure what the other store was: it fits the general profile of both FAO Schwarz and the Discovery Zone.

For the general reader, the academic part of the book is a little offputting, albeit of considerable interest. However, the academic stuff will make this an ideal academic text for classes in a wide variety of subject areas: not just sociology, but also women's studies and even business administration.
Saithi
The book shows the nuances of how race, gender and class can intersect in the American retail environment. Williams uses a personal case study, where she worked at two toy stores in her town. One catered to mostly white, upper middle class women. The other to a more racially and economically diverse clientele. She shows how the staffing varied between these stores. In part to cater to expected preferences by customers about who should work there.

Her book reveals the complexities of the interactions between the customers and the staff, and between the staff themselves. These could reflect a matrix of domination. Where a white female customer might in other contexts be discriminated against because of her gender. Yet, in a store, she might be privileged because of her race or sometimes by her class, if she was considered affluent by the staff. Williams ties this into negative experiences felt by some Negroes, termed "shopping while black".

The different jobs within a store are also shown to often have stereotyping. The directors are mostly white men. While white or light skinned black women are cashiers, and darker skinned men are stockers or gofers.

Some readers might question the paucity of her statistics. Only two stores were studied. Yet her conclusions ring true. After reading her book, you, too, might want to scrutinise your stores more carefully.
Ka
This was a book based on society within American culture. The author decides to go to two different toy stores. She chooses one toy store that services mainly White customeers of higher socio-economic status, the store contains "better" quality of products, has a nicer shopping environment and contains 'attentive', "help-you-anytime" retail associates. The second retail store that she chooses is considered to be, "ghetto" in simplest terms. The store "services" customers who are considered to be lower-class, the customers are predominately minorities, the retail employees are also predominately minorities, the toys are considered to be 'discounted' and the overall customer service is lacking.

She answers these questions in the book. Why are the two stores mainly divided by race and class and how are the gender roles achieved among both stores? How is society and it's people affected by this? How did it come to be like this?

It's evident that the working conditions, enviromental situations and overall retail 'shopping' experience has to do with inequality. This is what she states throughout the whole book.

One thing I did like about the book is that at some points she was correct, very correct. It was intriguing to see how she would identify associates's roles within their working environments and also throughout their daily lives of dealing with society. At this point she emphasizes the importance stereotypes play in dividing people up to do "different tasks" within the retail environment but also in daiy life.

Like I've stated before, she was repetitive. Although this book contains some informational context and facts it also has a sizeable amount of opinions as well..