» » New Faces in New Places: The Changing Geography of American Immigration

Download New Faces in New Places: The Changing Geography of American Immigration fb2

by Douglas S. Massey

Download New Faces in New Places: The Changing Geography of American Immigration fb2
Author: Douglas S. Massey
ISBN: 0871545861
Language: English
Pages: 380 pages
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation (February 1, 2008)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: lrf azw rtf lit
FB2 size: 1307 kb | EPUB size: 1369 kb | DJVU size: 1189 kb
Sub: Politics

DOUGLAS S. MASSEY is Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School

DOUGLAS S. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School.

New Faces in New Beginning in the 1990s, immigrants to the United States increasingly bypassed traditional .

New Faces in New Beginning in the 1990s, immigrants to the United States increasingly bypassed traditional gateway cites such as Los Angeles and New York to settle in smaller towns and cities throughout the nation. With immigrant communities popping up in so many new places, questions about ethnic diversity and immigrant assimilation confront more and more Americans. Enriched by perspectives from sociology, anthropology, and geography New Faces in New Places is essential reading for scholars of immigration and all those interested in learning the facts about new faces in new places in America.

As Douglas Massey argues in his conclusion, many of the towns profiled in this .

And the continual replenishment of the flow of immigrants may adversely affect the nation’s perception of how today’s newcomers are assimilating relative to previous waves of immigrants. Chapter 4 Changing Faces, Changing Places: The Emergence of New Nonmetropolitan Immigrant Gateways.

Reforms to immigration and labour policies are also essential to addressing these .

Reforms to immigration and labour policies are also essential to addressing these structural barriers to health for these men. View. Using the 1940, 1970, and 2000 Integrated Public Use Microdata Series files from the US Census, I regress second and . generation wage and educational outcomes in 1970 and 2000 on metro-area characteristics of a previous generation (1940 and 1970, respectively).

Center for Immigration Studies.

New Faces in New Places: The Changing Geography of American Immigration. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2008. Center for Immigration Studies.

As Douglas Massey argues in his conclusion, many of the towns profiled in this volume are not equipped with .

As Douglas Massey argues in his conclusion, many of the towns profiled in this volume are not equipped with the social and economic institutions to . Russell Sage Foundation, 2008. The ecology of inequality: Minorities and the concentration of poverty, 1970-1980. DS Massey, ML Eggers.

Douglas S. Massey New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 2008 . In this volume, Massey brings together an impressive collection of quantitative and qualitative studies, which is somewhat uncommon in demographic literature. The book concludes with a sombre note about the future course of the adaptation and assimilation of new immigrants in American society, known for its melting-pot model.

Using the latest census data and other population surveys, New Faces in New Places examines the causes and consequences of the shift toward new immigrant destinations.

If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation. More services and features.

Beginning in the 1990s, immigrants to the United States increasingly bypassed traditional gateway cites such as Los Angeles and New York to settle in smaller towns and cities throughout the nation. With immigrant communities popping up in so many new places, questions about ethnic diversity and immigrant assimilation confront more and more Americans. New Faces in New Places, edited by distinguished sociologist Douglas Massey, explores today’s geography of immigration and examines the ways in which native-born Americans are dealing with their new neighbors.

Using the latest census data and other population surveys, New Faces in New Places examines the causes and consequences of the shift toward new immigrant destinations. Contributors Mark Leach and Frank Bean examine the growing demand for low-wage labor and lower housing costs that have attracted many immigrants to move beyond the larger cities. Katharine Donato, Charles Tolbert, Alfred Nucci, and Yukio Kawano report that the majority of Mexican immigrants are no longer single male workers but entire families, who are settling in small towns and creating a surge among some rural populations long in decline. Katherine Fennelly shows how opinions about the growing immigrant population in a small Minnesota town are divided along socioeconomic lines among the local inhabitants. The town’s leadership and professional elites focus on immigrant contributions to the economic development and the diversification of the community, while working class residents fear new immigrants will bring crime and an increased tax burden to their communities. Helen Marrow reports that many African Americans in the rural south object to Hispanic immigrants benefiting from affirmative action even though they have just arrived in the United States and never experienced historical discrimination. As Douglas Massey argues in his conclusion, many of the towns profiled in this volume are not equipped with the social and economic institutions to help assimilate new immigrants that are available in the traditional immigrant gateways of New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago. And the continual replenishment of the flow of immigrants may adversely affect the nation’s perception of how today’s newcomers are assimilating relative to previous waves of immigrants.

New Faces in New Places illustrates the many ways that communities across the nation are reacting to the arrival of immigrant newcomers, and suggests that patterns and processes of assimilation in the twenty-first century may be quite different from those of the past. Enriched by perspectives from sociology, anthropology, and geography New Faces in New Places is essential reading for scholars of immigration and all those interested in learning the facts about new faces in new places in America.

Comments (3)
Rainbearer
This book is one of my go-to's to begin the conversation about new immigrant destinations and the changing landscapes of new arrivals in the US. Great breadth of examples and cases, very accessible.
I_LOVE_228
Excellent and relevant material.
romrom
No complaints, book was in near perfect condition. This was a required reading for a graduate class. Books are great to buy used.