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by Fergus Millar

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Author: Fergus Millar
ISBN: 0801480493
Language: English
Pages: 673 pages
Category: Politics & Government
Publisher: Cornell Univ Pr (June 1, 1992)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: lit mbr mobi lrf
FB2 size: 1870 kb | EPUB size: 1949 kb | DJVU size: 1273 kb
Sub: Politics

Focusing on the three centuries from Augustus to Constantine, the author analyzes the Roman emperor's functions. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Focusing on the three centuries from Augustus to Constantine, the author analyzes the Roman emperor's functions. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

the major topics in quality as well as case studies from relevant real-world situations yet without the need. 06 MB·56,562 Downloads·New!

Roman emperors - Duties, Rome - Politics and government - 30 .

Roman emperors - Duties, Rome - Politics and government - 30 . inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station12. cebu on March 4, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Iniciação à história da filosofia - Dos pré-socráticos a Wittgenstein.

This book is about the emperor inside the empire, not his military or diplomatic roles, or his role in moving grain, oil . I found this book to be relatively easy. Millar cites only contemporary (Roman) texts which made it easier for me.

Given how much new information has been uncovered in the last 30 years, that's a long time. Reading later books I can see how influential this book has been. The Roman World is from Augustus to Constantine, a little over 300 years.

The Emperor in the Roman World, 31 BC–AD 33. Rome, the Greek World, and the East vol. 2: Government, Society and Culture in the Roman Empire.

The Emperor in the Roman World, 31 BC–AD 337. Cornell University Press. Rome, the Greek World, and the East: Volume 3: The Greek World, the Jews, and the East. The University of North Carolina Press.

Saved in: Main Author: Millar, Fergus. Published: Ithaca, . Cornell University Press, 1977.

The Roman Near East: 31 BC-AD 337 (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures). Download (pdf, 2. 0 Mb) Donate Read.

BC AD 337 - Free ebook download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read book online for free. Fergus Millar-The Roman Republic in Political Thought (The Menahem Stern Jerusalem Lectures) (2002).

Fergus Millar the Roman Near East 31 BC AD 337 - Free ebook download as PDF File . Magic and Ritual in the Ancient World Religions in the Graeco Roman World. Загружено: Norma Hernández. Загружено: eberalejandro.

Chicago Distribution Center. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Carthage and Rome: Introduction. The Pupula Duplex and Other Tokens of an "Evil Eye" in the Light of Ophthalmology. The Omen of Sneezing. The Date of Composition of Caesar's Gallic War. Radin. Hercules, Mummius, and the Roman Triumph in Aeneid 8. Loar.

This book casts new light on a number of detailed historical qustions such as the sources of the emperor's wealth and the ways he spent it; the imperial residences and the mobility of the court; and the relatively small and simple entourage that the emperor needed to perform his functions. But above all, it emphasizes two major historical themes: the steady detachment of the emperor from the republican institutions of the city of Rome; and the way in which relations between Emperor and Church were shaped by the emperor's long-standing relations with cities, temples and associations in the pagan world.
Comments (4)
Dikus
Surely the best take on this subject, but the book is gigantic size, makes it hard to read in bed
Ger
Just great. I really can't recommend this highly enough. Well written and absolutely dense with detail and sources.
Aradwyn
Fergus Millar's book on the Roman emperor is the main resource on this topic. It analyzes the position of the emperor in relation to various other topics. These topics vary from the functions of the emperor to the emperor's companions to his relations with the cities and senate. These chapters cover topics related to the emperor such as imperial capitals, his advisers, his relationship with local councils, and the church. This book is intended as a corrective to previous books which he feels didn't adequately describe what the emperor did but instead described what they thought he should do. Thus this book goes back to the basics and provides examples from countless sources from across the Roman world.

Whether you accept his arguments or not will depend largely on what you think of his use of sources. While he has a wider ranging knowledge of the sources than seems possible he offers no analysis or consideration of them treating largely fictitious documents like the HA (or even Vergil) with as much seriousness as the major historians and inscriptions. He never really compares the accuracy of sources so much as lists examples from them that suit his thesis. To make clear my position I feel that he offers a lot of useful information and good ideas, but that a thorough knowledge of the sources is required beforehand. Sometimes fictitious sources can be used to prove a point if that point has to do with contemporary perceptions, but I am not convinced much of the time that his use of them is appropriate. Each example he uses must be judged based on your knowledge of that source and its relevance to the current topic. Not that non-professionals can't get much of value from this, but I'd be recommend when using any of his examples to check the nature of the source first.

But whether or not this is the best way of using sources it seems hard to argue with his conclusions. I disagree with some of them of course (just because people wanted emperors to respond to petitions doesn't mean they always did, nor that their responses were done personally) but on the whole his work is solid. It isn't exactly an easy read, but if you use it correctly it is an invaluable source. I would recommend though that you read this in conjunction with Campbell's The Emperor and the Roman Army since Millar doesn't mention soldiers in his book.
Braendo
If you have any interest in the varied roles and attributes of Roman emperors, then you should include this book in your personal library. After seeing this book appear in the bibliographies of so many notable histories of the Roman Empire, I had to check it out. Now I refer to it often in my research. It covers everything from Imperial palaces, to the Praetorian Guards and German bodyguard, freedmen secretaries, Imperial treasury and wealth, relationships to the senate, the Emperor as Judge, etc. It ranges from Augustus to Constantine.