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by Tomas Casas i Klett,Jean-Pierre Lehmann,John Haffner

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Author: Tomas Casas i Klett,Jean-Pierre Lehmann,John Haffner
ISBN: 1843313111
Language: English
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Politics & Government
Publisher: Anthem Press; First Edition, ed. edition (March 1, 2009)
Rating: 4.7
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FB2 size: 1470 kb | EPUB size: 1175 kb | DJVU size: 1179 kb
Sub: Politics

Japan stands at the brink of a major financial crisi. uthors John Haffner, Tomas Casas i Klett and Jean-Pierre Lehmann argue that an economic mega-shock would be helpful for the Japanese economy - throwing it open to new ideas, investments and policies.

Japan stands at the brink of a major financial crisi. What needs to done is summed up ‘Japan’s Open Future’. Authors John Haffner, Tomas Casas i Klett and Jean-Pierre Lehmann make a spirited case for a more flexible and globally engaged Japan. They also focus on the real problem: an absence of creative thinking in Tokyo. William Pesek, Bloomberg.

Dr Jean-Pierre Lehmann is Professor of International Political Economy at IMD; he is also Founding Director of the Evian Group. Библиографические данные. Japan's Open Future: An Agenda for Global Citizenship Anthem Asia-Pacific Series. John Haffner, Tomas Casas i Klett, Jean-Pierre Lehmann.

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Jean-Pierre Lehmann (29 August 1945 – 21 December 2017) was a Swiss economist who was professor of international political economy at IMD and the . is entitled Japan’s Open Future: An Agenda for Global Citizenship.

is entitled Japan’s Open Future: An Agenda for Global Citizenship.

Casas Klett, Tomas; Haffner, John & Lehmann, Jean-Pierre. Casas Klett, Tomas; Haffner, John & Lehmann, Jean-Pierre : Japan's Open Future : An Agenda for Global Citizenship. London : Anthem Press, 2009, - ISBN 978-1-84331-311-3.

Personal Name: Klett, Tomas Casas. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. Personal Name: Lehmann, Jean-Pierre, 1945-. Rubrics: National characteristics, Japanese Globalization Japan. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Japan's Open Future: The authors have written a book that falls into the genre of books that explain what is wrong with Japan and . Japan’s Open Future: An Agenda for Global Citizenship. Published by Anthem Press.

Japan's Open Future: The authors have written a book that falls into the genre of books that explain what is wrong with Japan and how it can be fixed. by John Haffner, Tomas Casas i Klett, Jean-Pierre Lehmann. ISBN: 1-8433-1311-1320 pp. The authors, a Canadian, a Spaniard, and a Frenchman, have written a book that falls squarely into the genre of books that explain what is wrong with Japan and how it can be fixed, and is one of the better books of the genre.

What needs to done is summed up Japan’s Open Future.

Japan's Open Future An Agenda for Global Citizenship. John Haffner, Tomas Casas i Klett, and Jean-Pierre Lehmann. Pub Date: March 2009 Binding: Hardback. What needs to done is summed up Japan’s Open Future.

An Agenda for Global Citizenship.

In the fast changing modern world where does Japan fit in, and how should it relate to the United States and China? Three foreign commentators make a provocative and persuasive argument that the time has come for Japan to help build a stronger Asian community, and to become an engage and conscientious global citizen.

Comments (5)
Impala Frozen
As someone who has been traveling to Japan on business for more than 10 years, you get a chance to see many of the challenges that are mentioned in this book firsthand. As an American, I know that my country has had its time in the limelight and that countries such as China, India and Russia will be filling the void as America declines further. As it looks today, without the support of a declining USA, Japan will struggle to compete and grow with its Asian neighbors. This excellent book highlights many of the ways that Japan can jump-start itself and change the way that the outside world views it, as well as helping its citizens better cope with a changing world order. This should be required reading for anyone doing business in Japan or for anyone who aspires to a career in international business.
Purestone
In our connected world, this does not miss any of the dots.
Whether coming to Japan, gaijin in Japan or Japanese(!) the agenda set by the authors needs to answered - the world and Japan will be a better place if the Japanese(politicians and people alike) take a more global perspective.
My only regret is that the book was not written a decade ago,.....?!
Nikobar
Japan has the world's second largest economy and Japanese brands dominate in many global markets. Japanese citizens enjoy the highest life expectancy in the world and healthcare is universal and affordable. Japan's streets are among the safest anywhere and its people among the most courteous. In PISA comparisons of reading ability, mathematics and science, Japanese students routinely score highly. These and other indices describe a country that is healthy, safe and successful.

But it is possible to paint a very different picture. Japan's economy has been stagnant for two decades and in many highly protected industries Japanese productivity is far below that of its principal competitors. Civil society is anaemic. Bureaucracy is sclerotic. Japan has one of the highest suicide rates in the world. The UN ranks Japan a shameful 54th in terms of gender equality. Japan (with a current population of 127 million) has produced fewer Nobel Prize winners than either Switzerland or the Netherlands. In international comparisons of English skills, Japan usually scores dismally and its education system is often accused of stifling creativity, originality and initiative. This is a side of Japan of which worldwide consumers of Toyotas, Nikons and Sonys are seldom aware.

Respectful of Japan's very considerable achievements but also honest about its significant problems, the authors of this very readable book set out to describe a better future for Japan. They argue that the country has a huge reservoir of untapped talent, that its protectionist and mercantilist policies are self-defeating, and that what they called its 'self-imposed Orientalism' blinds it to the benefits and advantages of greater exposure to foreigners. Indeed, a key thread running through this book is the extent to which Japan is still a 'closed' society. It can be accused of looking inwards, not outwards, backwards, not forwards. And its attitude to those beyond its shores is at best ambivalent, at worst disdainful.

It may be presumptuous of three foreigners to lecture Japan on its failings and to propose a vision for its future. But the tone of the book is constructive rather than critical and the authors' admiration for much of what Japan has created and achieved is obvious. Moreover, their sources are numerous, documented and reliable and their conclusions convincing. This is a well-researched book which advances a coherent argument: Japan has far more to gain from embracing change than it has to lose.
Lamranilv
Haffner, Casas i Klett & Lehmann offer a heart-felt plea for Japan to take a series of steps that they believe will make it more "open." The international environment has become more "complex" than it was a few decades ago (p. 10), they reason -- and complex in a way that creates an opportunity for Japanese leadership. Before Japan can lead, however, the authors argue that it (as a country) must reach out more fully to its neighbors and coordinate the organization of a multilateral block. This block should be, they continue, distinctively Asian (p. 13). Only by "embrac[ing an] Asian-based multilateralism [will Japan] promote its enlightened national self interest ..." (p. 14). "Japan does not yet see itself, in our central metaphor, as a global citizen," they explain. "The purpose of our book is to encourage this direction." (p. 15)
This is an impassioned case for a national change-of-heart in Japan. But readers will also find helpful the way it summarizes so many foreign complaints about Japan. In making their case for change, the authors argue that Japanese should:
* jettison claims to a national uniqueness (chap. 2);
* abandon national symbols like Yasukuni that offend their neighbors (chap. 1);
* learn English better (chap. 2);
* appoint more non-Japanese to university positions (chap. 2);
* open what the authors see as largely closed domestic markets (chap. 3);
* welcome risk at the corporate level in a way that the authors believe firms currently do not (chap.4);
* adopt different corporate governance regimes (chap. 4);
* change the courts in a way that the authors argue will make them a stronger check on the bureaucracy (chap. 5);
* jettison the Liberal Democratic Party (chap. 5); and
* welcome foreign immigrants (chap. 6).