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by Florin G. Sutton

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Author: Florin G. Sutton
ISBN: 0791401723
Language: English
Pages: 371 pages
Category: Philosophy
Publisher: SUNY Press (December 11, 1990)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lrf lit azw lrf
FB2 size: 1606 kb | EPUB size: 1595 kb | DJVU size: 1598 kb
Sub: Politics

The Lankavatara sutra has three identities at least Dr. Sutton not only has problems understanding Yogacara, he also seems to lack even a rudimentary understanding of Hinduism.

The Lankavatara sutra has three identities at least. It's early translations in the 400s in China became a whole school of interpretation unique to it, albeit it was replaced as the most popular Mahayana Sutra in China. This was a unique take and not necessarily proportional to what was in the minds of the people who made up the contributors to the Sanskrit text. Dr. For example, he defines the Atman as the "empirical Self. Anyone with a clue about Hinduism knows that the Atman is the metempirical (or noumenal) Self, not the empirical (or phenomenal) Self.

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of Mahayana Buddhism (SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies). Compiled in the second half of the fourth-century .

Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara Sutra: A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yoga Cara School of Mahayana Buddhism (SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies). by. Florin Giripescu Sutton. this sutra not only represents a comprehensive sy This book offers a systematic analysis of one of the most important concepts characterizing the Yogacara School of Buddhism (the last creative stage of Indian Buddhism) as outlined and explained in one of its most authoritative and influential texts, Lankavatara-sutra.

oceedings{E, title {Existence and Enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra.

oceedings{E, title {Existence and Enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra: A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogācāra School of Mahāyāna [email protected]@tence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara-sutra: A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogacara School of Mahayana Buddhism}, author {Florin Giripescu Sutton}, year {1991} }.

Existence and enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra . Studies in the Lankavatara Sutra. Reprint: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, New Delhi 1998

Existence and enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism, Albany, NY : State Univ. of New York Press, ISBN 0-7914-0172-3. Suzuki, D. T. (1930). Reprint: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, New Delhi 1998, ISBN 81-215-0833-9.

Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavafara-sufra A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogacara School of Mahayana Buddhism. State university of new york press

Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavafara-sufra A Study in the Ontology and Epistemology of the Yogacara School of Mahayana Buddhism. State university of new york press. State University of New York.

Western Studies in Indian Buddhist Logic-Epistemology. Yuguang Liu - 1998 - Philosophy and Culture 25 (12):1160-1173. The Great Debate in Mahayana Buddhism: The Nature of Consciousness. James Kenneth Powell - 1998 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison. The Buddhist Paradox of the Liar: A Quinian Defense of the Doctrine of Expedient Means. Edward Fried - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):598-638. Swami Narasimhananda - 2014 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):502-4.

Sutton FG (1992) Existence and enlightenment in the Lankāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism. Sri Satguru, Delhi, pp 252–254Google Scholar

Sutton FG (1992) Existence and enlightenment in the Lankāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism. Sri Satguru, Delhi, pp 252–254Google Scholar. 4. Makransky JJ (1998) Buddhahood embodied: sources of controversy in India and Tibet. Sri Satguru, Delhi, p 205Google Scholar. 5. Pande GC (1993) Studies in Mahāyāna. Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarnath, Varanasi, pp 126, 127Google Scholar. 6. Waldron WS (2003) The Buddhist unconscious: The Ālayavijñāna in the context of Indian Buddhist thought

Books Buddhist Buddha Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara-Sutra

Books Buddhist Buddha Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara-Sutra. Existence and Enlightenment in the Lankavatara-Sutra. by Florin Giripescu Sutton. Look Inside the Book. This is an interpretation of the Mahayana Buddhist world of ideas and spiritual aspirations, as it appeared toward the end of its Indian phase, before its further expansion beyond the land of its birth into China, Korea, and Japan. Our focus is the Yogacara philosophy, as reflected primarily in that fourth-century creative synthesis called The Visit to Lanka.

Existence and enlightenment in the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism, Albany, NY : State Univ. (2003).

This book offers a systematic analysis of one of the most important concepts characterizing the Yogacara School of Buddhism (the last creative stage of Indian Buddhism) as outlined and explained in one of its most authoritative and influential texts, Lankavatara-sutra. Compiled in the second half of the fourth-century A.D., this sutra not only represents a comprehensive synthesis of both early and late religio-philosophical ideas crucial to the understanding of Buddhism in India, but it also provides an insight into the very early roots of the Japanese Zen Buddhism in the heart of the South Asian esotericism.The first part of the book outlines the three-fold nature of Being, as conceptualized in Buddhist metaphysics. The author uses an interpretive framework borrowed from the existentialist philosophy of Heidegger, in order to separate the transcendental Essence of Being from its Temporal manifestation as Self, and from its Spatial or Cosmic dimension. The second part clarifies the Buddhist approach to knowledge in its religious, transcendental sense and it shows that the Buddhists were actually first in making use of dialectical reasoning for the purpose of transcending the contradictory dualities imbedded in the common ways of perceiving, thinking, and arguing about reality.
Comments (2)
Mr_NiCkNaMe
The Lankavatara sutra has three identities at least. It's early translations in the 400s in China became a whole school of interpretation unique to it, albeit it was replaced as the most popular Mahayana Sutra in China. This was a unique take and not necessarily proportional to what was in the minds of the people who made up the contributors to the Sanskrit text. Then there is the Lankavatara sutra as was seized on by its transit through Tibet where it was translated in the Imperial Era of the 800s, but in Tibet's medieval era became a spiritual-political football in the struggle between those who analyzed the Emptiness teachings and Yogacara teachings as being the second and third turning of the wheel of the Dharma, and then argued about which was the provisional truth and which was the definitive truth. The this wonderful sutra actually stands outside of this argument and stands on its own 2 feet. It is this third voice, the voice of the Lankavatara sutra that this author tries to bring out like a lawyer speaking for the text as if the text were someone on trial in the court of law.

It is time for this intelligent and erudite defense because now, 30 years after the text was translated by DT Suzuki, the decades have helped put many issues in perspective thanks to modern scholarship. We can actually hear the voice of the Sutra of above the roar of its traditional proponents of every school and camp.

Reference here is made to modern philosophy but what is borrowed is explained. Unlike some authors he does not try to translate Buddhism into some modern formal philosophical language.

It is interesting to see that this text, like many Mahayana Sutras, is actually a little library of collected smaller texts and sayings and he does a wonderful job of marshaling quotes from the book into a form less random than the looseleaf recipe-book collage of the actual text. This is one of those few modern academic texts on Buddhism is not only done in a clear voice that modern laypeople could understand, but it is talking about a subject in such a way as that one's own practice and understanding of Buddhism is deepened.
Fearlessrunner
The "Lankavatara Sutra" is the most authorative and influential text of the Yogacara (or "Mind-only") school of Indian Mahayana Buddhism, but it is a deep and abstruse work--and this has led to very different interpretations of its core tenets pertaining to the true nature of Mind (or Consciousness). And in "Existence and Enlightenment," author Florin Sutton (a professor of Asian studies) argues (as his core thesis) that "Universal Consciousness [or Mind]" is best understood as the consciousness which is common to all men, and, in this sense, universal (i.e., the subconscious in its most basic or pure state, the `Alaya'), rather than some universally present `stuff', `entity,' or `substance,' existing independently outside the realm of human mental activity."

From my perspective Dr. Sutton, couldn't be more wrong regarding Universal Consciousness, the Alaya. Universal Consciousness is the universal, transcendental, divine "Mind-Stuff," the unmanifest "All" that has manifested as the "all" (the universe of existents), but yet is utterly and forever independent of it.

Elsewhere, Dr. Sutton writes: "the undefiled Tathagata-garbha [Womb of Buddhahood] (when taken as essence) [can be] understood to designate the Unconscious in its original state." This is reminiscent of Carl Jung's westernized psychological nonsense in his foreword to W.Y. Evans-Wentz's "The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation."

Dr. Sutton's misunderstanding of Yogacara is hardly limited to the Alaya and the Tathagata-garbha; it extends into other areas of Buddha Dharma as well. For example, a chapter in his book is entitled "Dharmadhatu; the Spacial or Cosmic Dimension of Being." Unbeknownst to Dr. Sutton, the Dharmadhatu is not a cosmic dimension or space; it is the hypercosmic Dharmakaya as the spaceless "context" in which phenomena arise.

Dr. Sutton not only has problems understanding Yogacara, he also seems to lack even a rudimentary understanding of Hinduism. For example, he defines the Atman as the "empirical Self." Anyone with a clue about Hinduism knows that the Atman is the metempirical (or noumenal) Self, not the empirical (or phenomenal) Self.

In short, this is a deeply flawed text by an academic lacking real insight into Buddha Dharma; but because there are such few studies on the "Lankavatara Sutra," scholars might find some useful nuggets in it (such as Dr. Sutton's etymological analysis of Sanskrit terms germane to Yogacara). General readers, however, should look elsewhere for enlightenment on Yogacara and the "Lankavatara Sutra."