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by Arnold Shaw

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Author: Arnold Shaw
ISBN: 0195038916
Language: English
Pages: 368 pages
Category: Music
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 17, 1987)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lrf mbr docx doc
FB2 size: 1521 kb | EPUB size: 1980 kb | DJVU size: 1398 kb
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Arnold Shaw, winner of three ASCAP-Deems Taylor Awards, and author of such books as Honkers and Shouters . It's essential to show the proper place of jazz in the American music scene, but is more a basic introduction for anyone interested in the period.

It's essential to show the proper place of jazz in the American music scene, but is more a basic introduction for anyone interested in the period. 2 people found this helpful.

Arnold Shaw (1909–1989) was a songwriter and music business executive, primarily in the field of music publishing, who is best known for his comprehensive series of books on 20th century American popular music

Arnold Shaw (1909–1989) was a songwriter and music business executive, primarily in the field of music publishing, who is best known for his comprehensive series of books on 20th century American popular music. Shaw entered the field of popular music during the 1940s, as a pianist and composer.

Popular music - United States - 1921-1930 - History and criticism, Jazz - 1921-1930 - History and criticism, Musicals - United States - History and criticism, United States - History - 1919-1933. New York : Oxford University Press.

According to popular music historian Shaw (Honkers and Shouters, the jazz age began in 1917, with the appearance at Reisenweber's in New York of the all-white Original Dixieland Jazz Band and their first recordings of "the new music

According to popular music historian Shaw (Honkers and Shouters, the jazz age began in 1917, with the appearance at Reisenweber's in New York of the all-white Original Dixieland Jazz Band and their first recordings of "the new music. The years between then and the Wall Street crash of 1929often recalled as the roaring, torrid, frenzied '20swere a period seemingly dominated by flappers, gangsters and traffic in illegal booze but also, as Shaw demonstrates, by a fusion of black and white music and a plethora of revues, operettas and musical comedies created by "a flock.

The book includes a bibliography, a detailed discography, and lists of songs and films from the 1920s.

The Jazz Age : Popular Music in the 1920s

The Jazz Age : Popular Music in the 1920s. By (author) Arnold Shaw.

The Jazz Age: Popular Music in the 1920s (Paperback) The book includes a bibliography, a detailed discography, and lists of songs.

The Jazz Age: Popular Music in the 1920s (Paperback). Arnold Shaw (author). The book includes a bibliography, a detailed discography, and lists of songs and films from the 1920s. Arnold Shaw has produced an interesting history of the music of the twenties, relating it strongly to the social and political influences of the decade.

THE JAZZ AGE This page intentionally left blank A R N O L D SHAW THE JAZZ AGE Popular . The jazz age. This page intentionally left blank.

THE JAZZ AGE This page intentionally left blank A R N O L D SHAW THE JAZZ AGE Popular Music in the 1920's Oxford. THE JAZZ AGE Popular Music in the 1920's.

F. Scott Fitzgerald named it, Louis Armstrong launched it, Paul Whiteman and Fletcher Henderson orchestrated it, and now Arnold Shaw chronicles this fabulous era in The Jazz Age. Spicing his account with lively anecdotes and inside stories, he describes the astonishing outpouring of significant musical innovations that emerged during the "Roaring Twenties"--including blues, jazz, band music, torch ballads, operettas and musicals--and sets them against the background of the Prohibition world of the Flapper. The jazz age set the sound of popular music into the 1950s. It included the flowering of improvised music by such artists as Armstrong, Bix Benderbecke, and Duke Ellington; the maturation and Americanization of the Broadway musical theatre; the explosion of the arts celebrated in the Harlem Renaissance; the rise of the classical blues singers starting with Mamie Smith and climaxing with Bessie Smith; the evolution of ragtime into stride piano; the spread of "speakeasy" night life and the emergence of the Cabaret singers; the musical creativity of a whole range of composers and songwriters including Kern, Gershwin, Berlin, Youmans, Rodgers and Hart, and Cole Porter, whom Shaw calls Song Laureate of the Roaring 20s. Here is a lively account of all these significant developments and personalities. A bibliography, detailed discography, and two informative lists--songs of the 20s in Variety's Golden 100 and films featuring singers and songwriters of the era--round out the book.
Comments (5)
Lestony
This book is exceptional work by a gifted and knowledgeable writer and captures with great detail and explores the heart and soul of one of the greatest periods in American music. Thanks to the phonograph, the radio and the brilliant artists live performances the genius of African Americans broke wide open into mainstream America..

And don't be put off by the cheap shot, that he didn't get Paul Whiteman's moustache right.
Oppebro
I ordered this thinking that it would have sheet music in it, as well as commentary on the music style and history etc. But it does not.
So not that useful to me, but my mum loves it, and read it avidly.
Enila
I may be a little slow here, but I haven't found any way to complain about this title. I have downloaded it several times, but when I open the file it's unreadable. It jumps from the cover to page 153 and then to random pages. Plus, the pages seem to be corrupted images of the original page and not a Kindle formatted page.
Vobei
I bought this book for reference, and am happy that it's indexed both to personalities and song titles, although the discography (that is, recommended LPs) is out-of-date given that it was published in 1987. But the way in which the contents is arranged (1. The Jazz Age; 2. The Harlem Renaissance; 3. Tin Pan Alley - year by year; and 4. The Musical Theatre) creates unnecessary duplication, which should have been edited out. Added to which there are a number of fairly elementary mistakes.

Paul Whiteman did not have "a Chaplinesque mustache" (p.41). His recording of "Avalon" b/w "Dance of the Hours" did not take an entire day, with master after master ruined (P. 42) . On the contrary, at his first recording session, on 9th August 1920, two takes of "Avalon" were rejected, and the third take, on the 23rd, was used. In the meantime, "Dance of the Hours" was recorded on the 19th August, again the third take being successful. "Wang Wang Blues", also recorded at the first session, was not released under Henry Busse's name.

On P. 71 he refers to Bessie Smith's popularity as having waned by the time she did her final recording session in 1933, citing as evidence a drastic decrease in her session fee. That decline is attributable to the Depression, which caused a falling-off in record companies' activities to the extent that many went to the wall.

Writing about L. Wolfe Gilbert and his song "Waiting for the Robert E. Lee" (P. 113) Shaw refers to "a group of British showmen (who) tried to book him in England, a move opposed by his publisher, but ...the Englishmen took the number back with them, launching the ragtime craze in Great Britain". In point of fact, the producer was Albert de Courville, who brought him to London as part of The Ragtime Octet.

On P. 176 he writes that 1910 was "just before the ragtime fever swept the country in the wake of ...Alexander's Ragtime Band". That song was not a ragtime number, and the genre's popularity began around 1895.

On P. 205, "My Kinda Love" (March 1929) is described as a Decca recording, and Bing Crosby's first as solo vocalist. The recording was made for Columbia, and Bing had recorded solos with Whiteman previously, "Mary" (November 1927) being an obvious example. Similarly, Rudy Vallee's first recordings are incorrectly shown on P.210; he began recording in mid-1928, and the three titles listed were waxed in early 1929. It's hard to understand why they should be described as having "limited appeal".

Bing did not "remain with the Rhythm Boys" when he performed with Gus Arnheim at the Cocoanut Grove (P. 211), and he'd embarked on his "grandiose solo career" well before 1931. Rudy Vallee's "interruptions (to his university career) to play the saxophone with touring bands" (P. 217) is quite misleading. He and fellow student Carroll Gibbons were talent spotted, and recruited for the Savoy Hotel band in England. Caroll stayed, Vallee was homesick and returned to America. Maurice Chevalier did not "briefly leave the French music halls to charm American filmgoers" (P. 218) - he'd already starred at the Palace Theatre in London, then toured the States and played on Broadway in 1922. He went to Hollywood in 1928, for "Innocents of Paris", followed by "The Love Parade" and "The Big Pond".

On P. 239, Frank Crumit is shown as "Crummitt", and Cole Porter's song "I'm In Love Again" is dismissed as "it apparently made no impression as done by the Dolly Sisters (in the "Greenwich Village Follies of 1924"); it became a hit in 1951...". But according to Edward Foote Gardner's "Popular Songs of the Twentieth Century", it was a hit in July 1927, thanks to recordings by both Ben Bernie, and The Revellers.

Similarly, "I Guess I'll Have to Change My Plan" is said (P. 245) to have "made little impression in the show ("The Little Show"), but developed into a hit in the 1950's as a result of its use in a number of films"! In fact it was a hit in 1932, thanks to recordings by Rudy Vallee, Paul Whiteman and Guy Lombardo.

The London production of "Wake up and Dream" (P. 248) featured Jessie Matthews, not June Mathews, singing the title song.
Sarin
This goody describes American popular and show music during the period; Jazz was one of these forms and interacted in a number of ways with the other music. It's essential to show the proper place of jazz in the American music scene, but is more a basic introduction for anyone interested in the period.