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by Theodor W. Adorno

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Author: Theodor W. Adorno
ISBN: 0826401384
Language: English German
Category: Music
Publisher: Continuum Intl Pub Group (March 1, 1980)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: doc txt lit docx
FB2 size: 1677 kb | EPUB size: 1247 kb | DJVU size: 1806 kb
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This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Philosophy of Modern Music by Theodor Adorno published in 1973

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Philosophy of Modern Music by Theodor Adorno published in 1973. This book is the 1243rd greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

In many ways, Philosophy of Modern Music is a product of Adorno's exile in the United States, where he wrote the book . Theodor W. Adorno (1903-69) was a founder and arguably the foremost thinker of the Frankfurt School.

In many ways, Philosophy of Modern Music is a product of Adorno's exile in the United States, where he wrote the book while National Socialism fell apart in his European homeland. About the Author: Theodor W. His work has proved enormously influential in sociology, philosophy and cultural.

Philosophy of Modern Music book.

Philosophy of Modern Music – Selected Summaries and Interpretations. Choice of subject matter. Adorno opens with a quote by Walter Benjamin about the role of philosophy in identifying two opposing camps, and bringing them together through their relationship to a larger whole. The quote outlines Adorno’s Philosophy of Modern Music, which deals essentially with the two protagonists of 20th century music: Schoenberg and Stravinsky.

In this classic work of music theory Adorno critiques two major composers, Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky, who he presents as dialectically opposed to one another in terms of their musical styles, techniques and directions. Adorno's readings, especially of Schoenberg, continue to cause controversy and disagreement among musicians, music lovers and philosophers today.

5 Adorno's sociological methods. 6 Adorno translated into English.

Adorno's posthumously published Aesthetic Theory, which he planned to dedicate to Samuel Beckett, is the culmination of a lifelong commitment to modern art which attempts to revoke the "fatal separation" of feeling and understanding long demanded by the history of philosophy and explode the privilege aesthetics accords to content over form and contemplation over immersion. 5 Adorno's sociological methods.

Theodor W. Adorno (1903-69) was the leading philosopher of the Frankfurt School of social philosophers as well as a composer who studied under Alban Berg in Vienna. He also became personally acquainted with Arnold Schoenberg and Anton von Webern.

Philosophy of Modern Music (Paperback). More books by Theodor W. Adorno. In this classic work of music theory Adorno critiques two major composers, Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky, who he presents as dialectically opposed to one another in terms of their musical styles, techniques and directions.

Similar books and articles. Philosophy of New Music. Philosophy of Modern Music. Adorno - 2003 - Continuum. Robert W. Witkin - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):430-432. Philosophy and Music. Music, Philosophy, and Modernity. Andrew Bowie - 2007 - Cambridge University Press. Music as Negative Theology. Eduardo de la Fuente - 1999 - Thesis Eleven 56 (1):57-79. On Negative Spirit in Adorno's Musical Sociology. Jerrold Levinson - 2009 - Topoi 28 (2):119-123. Apparitions: New Perspectives on Adorno and Twentieth Century Music. Berthold Hoeckner (e. - 2006 - Routledge.

Three books of occult philosophy : completely annotated, with modern .

1,022 Pages·1993·394. The Rise of Modern Philosophy captures the fascinating story of the emergence. Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science VIII: Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science,:. and Philosophy of Science// Proceedings).

In this classic work, Adorno revolutionized music theory through an analysis of two composers he saw as polar opposites, Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky. Philosophy of Modern Music presents a profound study of key musical works of the twentieth century. But it is more than this because, as always with Adorno, a wide range of social and cultural questions are brought to bear on the analysis. In many ways, Philosophy of Modern Music is a product of Adorno's exile in the United States, where he wrote the book while National Socialism fell apart in his European homeland.
Comments (2)
Tojahn
Although out-of-print this is an event in the history of music comparable to primary musical works.It had to be Theodor Adorno a consummate intellect that created a new mode of contemplating contemporary art, music simply being the realm he knew more intimately,literature a close second. His prolific student from the late Fifties, Jurgen Habermas once said of Adorno, that he created theory spontaneously, simply within the course of a discussion, adept at synthesizing his thoughts as he spoke. But Adorno's importance for contemporary expression was assured,in that Adorno brought the complexity of philosophic,social and political thought to music. Something hardly done prior, and is only now within the past ten years beginning to be realized. See numerous studies on Adorno and his approach to speaking about music. To read the "Philosophy of Modern Music" is to understand Adorno's departures for his thought is the most exposed. Written in short cursive, aphorisitic-like paragraphs, almost approaching a sketch of a thought is to reveal a complexity, but one which engages his subject. The two polar opposites here are composers, Arnold Schoenberg(representing the progressive elements in music), and Igor Stravinsky(representing the backward-looking retrogressive elements). Adorno had considered the private artist working in seclusion as the highest form of rebellion, of subversion, for Adorno had contempt for the marketplace and how that magnetized and transformed art. Something of the market, in the late Forties was prevalent in jazz and film. Had Adorno lived into the age of computers and simulation,he would have seen to full extent how his thought has been realized in ever purified forms. Adorno thought Schoenberg's discovery of the 12-Tone dodecaphonic compositional method as a sign of progress. 12-Tone in a profound way was a synthesis, a conduit of the theoretical advancements of the history of music.It was both a beginning and an endpoint. But Schoenberg's method, althought quite new and unfinished allowed for all the parameters of music to be defined and developed, "Total Organization of the Elements of Music" is one paragraph here or section, "Differetiation and Coarseness" yet another referring to thinking about sound, as a sculptor would of his/her materials, shapting them, giving them form and direction. Stravinsky contrarywise indulged in looking backward, at the folksongs of his native Russia for music materials to be manipulated and the projection of sound without its deep attenuation. A view that is subjective now in retrospect,for Stravinsky was a grand orchestrator and a craftsman. But in Stravinsky, in particular his early period of the marvelously powerful ballet music, sound is pulverized,and is forced into suppressed forms,usually ashifting alternating suite of pieces,refocusing our short attention spans as required and, all in the projection of an image, a screeen for which the ballet takes place. But Adorno had takened issue with Stravinsky's subject matter as well as his technical means, a puppet in "Petrouska" one given over to a master without hope nor recourse.Likewise the "Rite of Spring" a virgin is simply sacrificed without recourse and we have the human image portraying the inevitability of natural forces, something Europe was about to experience first hand with the rise of fascism. These sections here are "Depersonalization" and "Fetishism of Means", explains Stravinsky's creativity stepping backwards within himself. In "Modes of Listening" Adorno refers to the "Shock" value that pummels the listener and the degradation of hearing into a music you merely submit to, whereas in Schoenberg there is more a sense of give and take,of the music allowing contemplative time. Again to my mind this is all relative, for these festures I find in both composers oeuvre. Still I find a conceptual power in Adorno,one that still nourishes today in the mileau of after-postmodernity.
Teonyo
The newer translation by Robert Hullot-Kentor is more comprehensible (to a non-German speaker) than this version. This was the only widely-available translation until recently.