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by Geoff Dyer

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Author: Geoff Dyer
ISBN: 0349118884
Language: English
Pages: 304 pages
Category: Individual Artists
Publisher: Abacus; New Ed edition (2006)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: txt mbr doc rtf
FB2 size: 1163 kb | EPUB size: 1862 kb | DJVU size: 1685 kb
Sub: Photo

The Ongoing Moment book. Geoff Dyer's subject matter is photography and photographers. Here he captures various moments by either European or more likely, American photographers at work.

The Ongoing Moment book. The book really focuses on the works of Alred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evens, André Kertész, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus, and my personal fave, William Eggleston.

The Ongoing Moment Dyer, Geoff Random House (USA) 9781400031689 : Great photographs change the way we see the world; The Ongoing Moment changes . The Ongoing Moment, Dyer, Geoff. Варианты приобретения.

The Ongoing Moment Dyer, Geoff Random House (USA) 9781400031689 : Great photographs change the way we see the world; The Ongoing Moment changes the way we look at both.

Geoff Dyer might not own a camera, but he reveals a keen understanding of photographers and their portraiture in The .

Geoff Dyer might not own a camera, but he reveals a keen understanding of photographers and their portraiture in The Ongoing Moment, says Sean O'Hagan. The obvious touchstone for Geoff Dyer's tenth book, which happens to be on photography, is his previous book on jazz, But Beautiful, which was written from the point of view of someone who simply liked listening to jazz, but nevertheless managed to be both erudite and illuminating. This offering, which is ambitious in its scale - 42 photographers are discussed, from the early 1800s to the present day - roams freely across decades, forms and subjects without losing its unifying thrust.

The author of four novels and nine works of non-fiction, Dyer is writer in residence at the University of Southern California and lives in Los Angeles. Библиографические данные.

Geoff Dyer's delightful answer in The Ongoing Moment is to write about photography photographically: which is to. .It takes a while to get what he is up to. The book's title - a paraphrase of Cartier-Bresson's paraphrase of de Retz's famous "defining moment" - seems laboured and clumsy.

It takes a while to get what he is up to. Dyer's defence of his writing - "I might not be a photographer, but I see the kind of photographs I might have taken if I were" - sounds ominously like those Daily Mail readers who know nothing about art other than what they like.

Geoff Dyer (born 5 June 1958) is an English writer. Kathryn Schulz, writing in New York, described him as "one of our greatest living critics, not of the arts but of life itself, and one of our most original writers". Dyer was born and raised in Cheltenham, England, as the only child of a sheet metal worker father and a school dinner lady mother

Great photographs change the way we see the world; The Ongoing Moment changes the way we look at both.

The Ongoing Moment: A Book About Photographs (Paperback). The Ongoing Moment changes the way we look at both. With characteristic perversity and trademark originality, The Ongoing Moment is Dyer's unique and idiosyncratic history of photography. Seeking to identify their signature styles Dyer looks at the ways canonical figures such as Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Kertesz, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus and William Eggleston have photographed the same scenes and objects (benches, hats, hands, roads).

Great photographs change the way we see the world; The Ongoing Moment changes the way we look at both. Focusing on the ways in which canonical figures like Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, André Kertész, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus, and William Eggleston have photographed the same things-barber shops, benches, hands, roads, signs-award-winning writer Geoff Dyer seeks to identify their signature styles. In doing so, he constructs a narrative in which these photographers-many of whom never met-constantly encounter one another.

Great photographs change the way we see the world; The Ongoing Moment changes the way we look at both.Focusing on the ways in which canonical figures like Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, André Kertész, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus, and William Eggleston have photographed the same things—barber shops, benches, hands, roads, signs—award-winning writer Geoff Dyer seeks to identify their signature styles. In doing so, he constructs a narrative in which these photographers—many of whom never met—constantly encounter one another. The result is a kaleidoscopic work of extraordinary originality and insight.

Comments (7)
Cordann
Here is a man who thinks about what he sees. Many interesting comments on well-known and not so well known photographer-artists. You'll be introduced to some you've never heard of and of course, you'll think of some he apparently doesn't know but that's the fun of it. A very intriguing mixture of insight and gossip. There aren't many books on photography that criticizes a Steiglitz photograph of Georgia O'Keefe's genitalia because it doesn't show enough detail! I strongly recommend this book for all photographers, particularly those many who look without seeing. Rating would have been 5 stars if it weren't for indifferent reproduction of photos plus omission of some images discussed in the text. Apparently some artists ( or their estates) are possessive to the point of paranoia.
Voodoozragore
I have read it twice, and I believe this is the kind of book that I will enjoy re-reading every few years. Not the least, Geoff Dyer reconciles us with the idea that it does not matter how a subject, even a thing, has been photographed before, in and of itself no deterrent to shoot it again.

On the contrary, one could feel invited to add one's photographic interpretation to those of the past, even relish in doing so, guiltlessly.

Goeff doesn't claim that his book is about photography as a whole, it is just about photographs, a whole bunch of them, and the photographers who made them.

So that in the end, we, as readers, might find that after all, this may be the best book we have read, about photography.

The style is engaging, the ideas both original and entertaining, the author's wit and perspicacity matched by the depth of the insights, and a sure-footed intellectual engagement. It's fun to read, while we are given a lot to reflect upon.

For someone who claims not to take pictures, Geoff Dyer knows a lot about photos. Highly recommended.
Nightscar
Gave it for a gift. The recipient loved it!
Grotilar
This is the view of photography from a writer not an art critic or photographer. Dyer gives his unique insight into several prominent photographers by speaking of particular photographic images that have a common thread that links them all. It is an intriguing viewpoint that is very enlightening, entertaining and educational.
avanger
Was expecting to see more images. Overall, an interesting look at photography from a alternate perspective.
Saimath
Good for people interested in photography. Geoff Dyer writes amusingly on other subjects. I don't often laugh out loud.
Livina
Some very good perceptions; some dross too
Dyer, a non-photographer has taken on the task of trying to catalog trends in photography. Its weaknesses are that it is limited as the author writes (he did have to get permission to use images) and is mainly American men and twentieth century. While it includes Diane Arbus, Dorothea Lange and Nan Goldin extensively and two brief mentions of Imogen Cunningham. The absence of Margaret Bourke-White, Lisette Model, Sally Mann, Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Tina Barney when they would have fit into what was studied created the typical boys club attitude.

That being said it is still a good introductory to thinking about what is going in your photographs. Without taking a photograph he illuminates the subject of subject matter.

By having no chapters but rather by slipping in and out of subject matter he does a very good job of introducing photographic history and theory to the beginner. He allows people to think about how they have been influenced by the images and social meanings of subject matter that goes into a photographer's decision to trip the shutter.

One of the greatest lessons for a photographer to learn is that you are not photographing a completely new idea. You as a photographer have been influenced by the society that you have grown up in and while you may not consciously recognize that an image is familiar to you that image has been seen before. Dyer indicates that quotation can sometimes create better images by the quoter than the quoted and allows the photographer to make a statement about the quoted.

Dyer as an Englishman can take an outsider's view of American photography and recognize cultural differences and preferences that an American inherently overlooks as natural. I think that this helps him understand Robert Frank even more than Americans think they do, however it also ignored William Klein's work that was always overshadowed by Frank's coming out a year or two later and grabbing the attention.

Overall he did a thorough examination within the limitations of the length of the book and images to use (images should be larger) and tied it altogether by the end. It is hard to write a cohesive book on such a wide subject so the author who hopes that his book can be read non-linearally did an excellent job of weaving an image into his tapestry.