» » The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?: A Complete, Do-It-Yourself Toolkit to Navigate Your Financial Future

Download The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?: A Complete, Do-It-Yourself Toolkit to Navigate Your Financial Future fb2

by Jason R. Doss,Frank Armstrong III

Download The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?: A Complete, Do-It-Yourself Toolkit to Navigate Your Financial Future fb2
Author: Jason R. Doss,Frank Armstrong III
ISBN: 0132361329
Language: English
Pages: 288 pages
Category: Personal Finance
Publisher: FT Press; 1 edition (January 22, 2009)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: rtf azw txt mbr
FB2 size: 1561 kb | EPUB size: 1534 kb | DJVU size: 1152 kb

The Retirement Challenge:. has been added to your Cart

The Retirement Challenge:. has been added to your Cart. Armstrong and Doss have written a simple and understandable guide through the maze that is our financial world. If your goal is to outperform the vast majority of investors on the road to retirement,The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?paves the way. -TAYLOR LARIMORE, coauthor ofThe Bogleheads' Guide to Investing. This is a great handbook for those planning for retirement. This book lays it on the line about the reality of retirement planning and just how far you can expect your retirement funds to go. The book has many, many good points

The Retirement Challenge book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

The Retirement Challenge book. Start by marking The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?: A Complete, Do-It-Yourself Toolkit to Navigate Your Financial Future as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

by Frank Armstrong III & Jason R. Doss. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away. 56 MB·11,713 Downloads·New! An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise.

Find nearly any book by Frank Armstrong II.

Find nearly any book by Frank Armstrong III. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Save Your Retirement: What to Do If You Haven't Saved Enough or If Your Investments Were Devastated by the Market Meltdown. by Frank Armstrong III, Paul B. Brown.

They will have demolished it by the time you come to our city again, I think. 7. Tornadoes speed through the island every year. 8. By that time you will have gone crazy or forgotten it all. By the end of the season they will have damaged many buildings and will have injured and killed many people.

We do not use will to say what somebody has already arranged or decided to. .Generally we use will to talk about the future, but sometimes we use will to talk about now. For example: Don't phone Ann now.

We do not use will to say what somebody has already arranged or decided to do in the future: Ann is working next week. not 'Ann will work') Are you going to watch television this evening? (not 'will you watch') For 'I'm working. But often, when we talk about the future, we are not talking about what somebody has decided to d. He hasn't worked hard enough for it. When will you know your exam results? We often use will ('ll) with: probably: I'll probably be home late this evening. I expect: I haven't seen Carol today.

“Imagine that you board an airliner and are told that you will be piloting the plane. Such is the plight of tens of millions of Americans, on whom have been foisted a jumble of 401(k), 403(b), and 457 defined contribution plans, and are as well qualified to manage their retirement portfolios as they are to pilot a jet from Los Angeles to Boston. Since things aren’t changing any time soon, you may very well need flying lessons, and pronto. Frank Armstrong’s The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim? is just the ground school you need.”

–William Bernstein, author of A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World and The Four Pillars of Investing: Lessons for Building a Winning Portfolio

“Armstrong and Doss have written a simple and understandable guide through the maze that is our financial world. If your goal is to outperform the vast majority of investors on the road to retirement, The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim? paves the way.”

–TAYLOR LARIMORE, coauthor of The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing

“This is a great handbook for those planning for retirement. Armstrong and Doss not only tell you the right way to build a plan, they also show you how to avoid purchasing products from the wolves of Wall Street that lead investors to be sheared like sheep.”

–LARRY SWEDROE, author of The Only Guide to Alternative Investments You’ll Ever Needand Wise Investing Made Simple

“In today’s investment markets, this is an invaluable book. If you care about the quality of the rest of your life, you owe it to yourself and your family to read The Retirement Challenge: Will You Sink or Swim?

–HAROLD EVENSKY, CFP®, AIF®, President, Evensky & Katz

In 48 quick, practical lessons, Armstrong shows how to assess what you have and what you’ll need to build a simple, reliable retirement plan. Better yet, the book’s easy online calculators do all the math for you. Investing for retirement has never been so sensible and simple!Includes free access to comprehensive Web-based tools and resources at www.Sink-Swim.com:

More than 75 easy-to-use online calculators and budget spreadsheets to help you get on track and stay on track Sample asset allocation plans you can adjust for any stage of your career and any portfolio Up-to-the-minute updates on pension law, regulation, enforcement, and estate planning Free Sink or Swim Newsletter, and much more
Comments (7)
Azago
He covers quite a few topics and has good info on each, this book is best for someone just learning this subject. If you are a little experienced already and need ideas beyond the basics - this isn't a good choice.
Olma
This book is well written and direct. Although it is of the greatest benefit for younger people just beginning to plan for their retirement, it is still valuable to those of us in our 60s.
Iseared
Retirement planning is more than just saving a lot of money. This book presents a lot of information on investing for retirement, but not a lot about planning (what you need) for retirement besides money.

Some investments discussed here are specific to some people and not to others, but that's the nature of investments. The book offers a lot of tools to help you make decisions, including online tools at the companion Web site noted in the "lessons." This book mostly talks about how to save and invest to pay for what you'll need. An overall strategy on what blend of investments would be helpful.

I need an approach to tackling the enormous problem of living without a job income, starting with deciding how much I will need and when, how to guess how money will change in the future, and how to tell if you are saving enough or even too much. A chapter on things you need or may want during retirement would be helpful - for example, long-term care insurance, or investing in a retirement community that includes care.

Let me borrow the analogy of William Bernstein from the back cover: "Imagine that you board an airliner and are told that you will be piloting the plane ... you may very well need flying lessons, and pronto." This book tells you about the controls, and even points out how changing some may make the plane turn or ascend, but it does not walk you through the process of taking off, navigating to a destination, and landing.

I wanted this book to help me be my own financial planner. That's a tall order for a book this size. I guess that's why there's a section here on how to choose one. And it makes a very useful companion to a financial planner, helping you understand the terminology and options. I think this book would be more useful to a person in their 30s, who is mostly concerned with saving, than someone who needs to plan their retirement strategy, and does not know the basics.

BOTTOM LINE: It's a good book, but it does not live up to the sunny marketing prose in the description and back-cover reviews. There are tools at the book's Web site (sink-swim dot com) that bring value beyond the book itself. I give three stars to mean it's good, though not all I expected.

DISCLOSURE: Amazon provided this book in exchange for my review. All of my reviews are written honestly - exactly as I see them - and most of my reviews are for items I have purchased.
Small Black
Retirement planning is something that most Americans do very poorly. There is a head in the sand approach that it will all work out somehow. This book lays it on the line about the reality of retirement planning and just how far you can expect your retirement funds to go.

The book has many, many good points:

1 - good, clear explanation of portfolio diversification
2 - understandable information on what you can reasonably expect to be able to draw down from your retirement savings and not run out of money
3 - nice example of the power of compounding
4 - how asset allocation needs to change over time (including once you are retired)
5 - excellent explanation of how "financial advisors" are paid and many of them give advice that generates income for themselves rather than doing what is best for the investor.
6 - Lots of calculators available on-line to help make the information more personal to the individual

On the negative side :

1 - The first 90 pages or so are filled with negativity around employer-sponsored defined benefit plans. There was a snippy tone that I found to be very offensive. Having worked in the benefits department of a Fortune 500 company and dealing with this very topic for several years, I can tell you that trying to get the best possible plan in place at the lowest cost was our constant objective. What the author fails to fully understand is that the employees designing and administering these plans have to use them as well. The interest of the employees designing the plan lined up perfectly with the interest of the other employees. It is also noteworthy that investment advisors don't make any money on the assets you keep in a company-sponsored plan and that isn't addressed by the author. I can't tell you the number of times that advisors recommended roll-overs when it was obvious they were trying to get more assets under their control and increase their own paychecks along the way.

2 - Not much ink is dedicated to the way Americans live and spend their money. While he touches on the issue, many people who don't save for retirement (or don't save enough) could have with a little self discipline and awareness of how small expenditures really can add up to lots of wasted opportunity. If you drive through a fast food restaurant every day on your way to work and pick up a soft drink for $1.80 that would have cost 25 cents for the can had you purchased it in the grocery store earlier and brought it from home, you are spending almost $400 year more for the drink. Same with coffee purchases, cigarettes, etc. I can't tell you the number of times I have sat down with someone to discuss retirement and hear them talk about how they don't know how they are going to make it on their pension (100% funded by the company) since they have no savings in their 401(k) plan. Many times those same people talked about their boats, their last vacation, the new car they just purchase, or all the new clothes they bought for the new grandchild, etc. Until people spend their money wisely and learn to live within their means, saving for retirement isn't even on their radar screens.

Overall, a good source of information on the subject, particularly for those unfamiliar with the topic.