» » Beep! Beep!: Competing in the Age of the Road Runner

Download Beep! Beep!: Competing in the Age of the Road Runner fb2

by Oren Harari,Chip R. Bell

Download Beep! Beep!: Competing in the Age of the Road Runner fb2
Author: Oren Harari,Chip R. Bell
ISBN: 0446676543
Language: English
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Management & Leadership
Publisher: Business Plus; Reprint edition (January 1, 2001)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: lrf txt docx mbr
FB2 size: 1582 kb | EPUB size: 1550 kb | DJVU size: 1226 kb

Chip R. Bell and Oren Harari’s book turns a cartoon classic into a wonderful metaphor for today’s fast-paced work environment. Organizations are changing their cunning competitive ways.

As in Jones's animated cartoons, Road Runners win and Coyotes lose. Chip R. Instead of behaving like Wile E. Coyote, they are becoming like the quick, agile, joyful Road Runner. In an amusing style, the authors illustrate their points with cartoons of the famous duo and plenty of plot scenarios and interesting tidbits of trivia.

The authors use the cartoon characters of Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner as a metaphor for business managers seeking marketplace victories.

just finished reading Beep Beep. It is an amazing book. Loved the analogy of Road Runner and Wile E Coyote for 21st century business vs 20th century management. I will be using this book in the management courses I teach and in my marketing consulting business. The simplicty and power of this book are incredible. I think there's best seller here!

Oren Harari, Chip R. Bell.

Oren Harari, Chip R. Rob Robins, executive vice president, Visa USA If you're like most red-blooded business managers, you grew up watching a scruffy coyote futilely chasing a colorful bird. Now you're competing against companies started by who sleep under their desks. Be honest: In today's business world, who is chasing whom? In business today you are either a Wile E. Coyote or a Road Runner

by Chip R. Bell, Oren Harari. Library descriptions. No library descriptions found

by Chip R. The authors use the cartoon characters of Wile E. Recently added by. DIWalker1960, KinghornLibrary, viper1, mvollmers, AISTirana, kaymoore68, IanKendall, mjdrabik, lemarmion. No library descriptions found. LibraryThing members' description. ISBN: 0446676543; Издательство: Warner Business Books. This book is designed to help you and the people who work with you become Road Runners-road warriors in a new era of supercharged, superchanging business competition. A brisk, informative, and highly entertaining read, BEEP!

Oren Harari (July 30, 1949 - April 10, 2010) was a business professor at the University of San Francisco as well as an author .

Oren Harari (July 30, 1949 - April 10, 2010) was a business professor at the University of San Francisco as well as an author of several management books, including The Leadership Secrets of Colin Powell, a New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg Businessweek bestseller.

Read Beep Beep The Road Runner comic online free and high quality. Fast loading speed, unique reading type: All pages - just need to scroll to read next page. Beep Beep The Road Runner. Publication date: October 1966 - June 1984.

Bell and Harari show business entrepreneurs how to hit the road running with instant speed and . Oren Harari, Chip R.

Bell and Harari show business entrepreneurs how to hit the road running with instant speed and adaptability to harsh conditions. This management handbook teaches readers how to outperform, outsmart and outrun your competition by successfully adapting to the changing business climate. Grand Central Publishing.

Managers as Mentors: Building Partnerships for Learning. Beep! : Competing in the Age of the Road Runner. 2 RUR. Managing Knock Your Socks Off Service (Knock Your Socks Off Series). Bell, Ron Zemke. 51. RUR. Beep! Beep! : Competing in the Age of the Road Runner. 78. Magnetic Service: Secrets for Creating Passionately Devoted Customers. Bell, Bilijack R. 1202 RUR. Bell, Ron Zemke, David Zielinski. 6 RUR. Take Their Breath Away.

This management handbook teaches readers how to outperform, outsmart and outrun your competition by successfully adapting to the changing business climate. The authors use the cartoon characters of Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner as a metaphor for business managers seeking marketplace victories.
Comments (7)
Rias
I enjoy this book's attempt to psychoanalyze Wile E. Coyote and the Roadrunner. What really makes me laugh is Enron being touted as an example of success! Oh, how the mighty have fallen... Still, the book's points are mostly valid, and the United States does need a new business model.
Dodo
The Road Runner cartoons are classic. Most of us grew up laughing out loud as Wile E. Coyote encountered one challenge after another in his attempts to capture the Road Runner. The scenarios were simple. The coyote devised ways to capture lunch, never winning the competition. His tools, all products of Acme Company, backfired on him. He caused himself a great deal of difficulty, while the Road Runner went on with his life, practically oblivious to the coyote's campaign.
At the start of their book, Bell and Harari note that coyotes can run 30 miles per hour and road runners can't really fly and can only run 16 miles per hour. Wile E. Coyote has an endless arsenal of gadgets to trap the road runner, all provided by his single supplier, Acme. He's a master planner, yet continually fails . . . of his own volition. What's the problem here? Why is the Road Runner so successful? Because he's operating under different rules. The coyote may be seen as chained to conventional wisdom, doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. A bureaucrat. The Road Runner is more like the agile entrepreneur, competing with a whole different paradigm.
The authors take this familiar cartoon and turn it into an instructive business case. Their objective is to help us become road runners among coyotes. In page after page, they pull lessons from the cartoons that we probably all missed as kids, comparing the characters and their motivations and their results. "Wile E. Coyote is preoccupied, earnest, conniving, and grim. The Road Runner is joyful, light, and free. Wile E. does nothing but go from pursuing one meal to the next, with perpetual frustration; the bird is gleefully living life to the fullest. The results are the same: Wile E. somehow manages to dig himself into the hole of failure, while the Road Runner strides on, undeterred and unaffected by life's bumps and obstacles."
Can you imagine the authors conducting their research for this book?
As we move through the book, we learn more about the comparative principles and how to succeed in the Age of the Road Runner. Familiar names populate the pages as we are provided with examples of companies and people. A "Tail Feathers" feature spotlights ordinary people doing extraordinary things-as Road Runners. The stories are inspirational, as well as educational. "Bird Seed" sections furnish the reader with solid advice that fits the concept, but it not linked to the two main characters.
Descriptive summaries of Road Runner cartoon incidents are liberally sprinkled throughout the book, keeping the reader laughing and smiling and wondering in amazement how the coyote could keep going in this futile struggle. And therein lies the tale of this book. To survive in a Road Runner Age, you cannot continue to operate like a coyote. The book is filled with current wisdom, but just as important, it's a fun book to read. People learn more when they're laughing, so expect to gain a lot from Beep! Beep!
Mr_Jeйson
When the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote were introduced by Chuck Jones in 1949, the global marketplace was certainly quite different from what it is today. For example, the economies of countries such as Germany and Japan had only begun to recover from World War II. The U.S.S.R. was solidly intact behind what Winston Churchill described as an "Iron Curtain." About that time, Thomas Watson, Sr. insisted that the entire worldwide market for computers was (at the most) seven. (According to some accounts, the estimate was five.) More than 40 years would pass before the WWW would be established. That was then. Chip R. Bell and Oren Harari suggest that we now compete in The Age of the Road Runner. As in Jones's animated cartoons, Road Runners win and Coyotes lose. Why? That is one question which the authors answer in BEEP! BEEP! Unlike real coyotes, Wile E. Coyote's human counterparts can become a Road Runner. How? That is another question which the authors also answer. Don't be deterred by the title. (I was. I feared this was another gimmicky business book with a snappy title and anorexic content. I was wrong.) On the dust jacket, Michael Dell is quoted as saying that this book is "very powerful and entertaining." That's true. Bell and Harari juxtapose two antagonists which serve as metaphors throughout a rigorous but delightful examination of the reasons for both success and failure in the global marketplace.
The authors offer some truly valuable insights into serious matters such as leadership, "competing in the terrain of the future", collaborative "flocking" (as opposed to mindless regimentation), strategic uses of speed, flexibility and adaptability, the power of honorable cultures, the "magic" of curiosity and innovation, and the importance of joy (as opposed to pleasure). I especially appreciate the inclusion of several dozen boxed items (eg "Birdseed") which supplement (indeed nourish) the narrative.
Near the end of the book, the authors briefly discuss Alan Shafer, Group Vice President of Cincinnati-based Milacron's Industrial Products division. The subject is Shafer's business philosophy which boils down to three premises: "First, push the envelope." (Harvey Mackay would certainly agree.) "Next, share the credit....Finally, have fun doing it." We all know about fun-loving cultures such as those of Milacron and Southwest Airlines. So many other companies incorrectly assume that it is impossible for them to have such a culture. According to Shafer, "Fun is how you keep your road runners motivated....Fun is how you turn your coyotes into roadrunners." Bell and Harari provide a road map and an operations manual.
They fully understand how difficult it can be for an organization to turn its coyotes into road runners. The point is, that all organizations CAN. Here is a brief excerpt in which the authors comment on speed: "The key to the Road Runner's success is that he's more than just fast. He's unpredictable, he zigs and zags, he reacts creatively real-time. In a world where linear speed is a commodity, any organization can use technologies that compress time....The key to thriving is no longer just the ability to work fast, but what [italics] you are able to do fast."
Here's one initiative I strongly recommend: purchase a book which discusses key business issues with both wit and wisdom, then apply what you have learned. How soon should you take this initiative? Beep! Beep!
Yojin
Wile E. Coyote hovers in a hot air balloon over the road, waiting to drop an anvil on the unsuspecting Road Runner. Wile E. puts a grenade in the seat of a toy airplane and ... you know what happens. He becomes the victim of his own diabolical plans. The Road Runner wins every time. Chip R. Bell and Oren Harari’s book turns a cartoon classic into a wonderful metaphor for today’s fast-paced work environment. Organizations are changing their cunning competitive ways. Instead of behaving like Wile E. Coyote, they are becoming like the quick, agile, joyful Road Runner. In an amusing style, the authors illustrate their points with cartoons of the famous duo and plenty of plot scenarios and interesting tidbits of trivia. The “Birdseed” sections scatter tips to help you and your company make the transition to the wide-open desert of opportunity ahead. Those who grew up with Road Runner will relate to this book immediately. We ...recommend this book to Road Runner’s business fans or to anyone who wants to have fun while learning how to steer a company through the speedy new marketplace.