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by Scott Gray

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Author: Scott Gray
ISBN: 0767919904
Language: English
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Biographies
Publisher: Broadway (March 13, 2007)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: mobi mbr lrf lrf
FB2 size: 1287 kb | EPUB size: 1928 kb | DJVU size: 1244 kb
Sub: Outdoors

Gray, an obvious fan, takes a different approach to the first part of the book. And it's just that same kind of readability that makes Scott Gray's book sparkle.

Gray, an obvious fan, takes a different approach to the first part of the book. James always has included autobiographical references in his writing, and Gray uses them as part of the text. They are mixed in with information from James himself or from other sources. This actually works pretty well, surprisingly enough. The subject of sabermetrics always runs the risk of sounding like after-school homework. For Grey-and his subject, James-the tone is more like a fieldtrip to the ballpark.

Start by marking The Mind of Bill James: How a. .This book was great in that it had tons of excerpts from Bill James' own writings throughout the course of his career.

Start by marking The Mind of Bill James: How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Bill James may not have started everything (analysis of baseball began right after the first pitch was thrown, no doubt), but James gave the gift of his wit and intellect. First, it was through self-published works in the 1970’s that he sold from tiny advertisements in the back of The Sporting News. There's certainly been no better writer and thinker from this generation.

The Mind of Bill James" tells the story of how a gifted outsider inspired a new understanding of baseball. It also brings together his best writing, much of it long out of print, as well as insights from new interviews.

In 2002, the Boston Red Sox hired James as an advisor. Two years later they achieved their long-awaited World Series triumph. The Mind of Bill James tells the story of how a gifted outsider inspired a new understanding of baseball

In 2002, the Boston Red Sox hired James as an advisor. The Mind of Bill James tells the story of how a gifted outsider inspired a new understanding of baseball.

According to Scott Gray (working with Bill James), "Secondary average is a much better indicator of offensive ability than . The Mind of Bill James: How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball. New York: Doubleday, 2006.

According to Scott Gray (working with Bill James), "Secondary average is a much better indicator of offensive ability than batting average". Since secondary average evaluates a player's offensive contribution independent of batting average, it can identify players who have low batting averages yet are still productive offensively.

Gray presents the first book to chronicle the life and ideas of the serious .

Gray presents the first book to chronicle the life and ideas of the serious baseball fan's high priest (New York Times), the impact of his brilliant and hilarious writings-and how someone who never pitched a ball, held a bat, or managed a team fundamentally changed the way baseball is interpreted, analyzed, and even played. If you want to know more about the mind of Bill James, then this is the book for you. A refreshing take on a complex subject. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, both as a baseball fan and as someone interested in nonfiction work in general.

Published in 2006 and written by Scott Gray, The Mind of Bill James: How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball covers Bill James' life from Mayetta, KS through college.

Published in 2006 and written by Scott Gray, The Mind of Bill James: How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball covers Bill James' life from Mayetta, KS through college, writing his first baseball books while working security at a pork and beans plant, and his publishing career.

James self-published an annual book titled The Bill James Baseball .

James self-published an annual book titled The Bill James Baseball Abstract beginning in 1977. This article on an author is a stub. 1985 Baseball Abstract. Standardization leads to rigidity, and rigidity causes things to break. Quoted in Gray, Scott (2006). pp. 191. ISBN 0-385-51464-6. There will always be people who are ahead of the curve, and people who are behind the curve. But knowledge moves the curve.

How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball. James began writing about baseball while working at a factory in his native Kansas. Books related to The Mind of Bill James. In lively, often acerbic prose, he used statistics to challenge entrenched beliefs and uncover surprising truths about the game. His annual Baseball Abstract captured the attention of fans and front offices and went on to become a bestselling staple of the baseball book category. In 2002, the Boston Red Sox hired James as an advisor. Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game.

Discover Bill James famous and rare quotes. The Mind of Bill James: How a Complete Outsider Changed Baseball". Book by Scott Gray, 2006.

The first book to chronicle the life and ideas of “the serious baseball fan’s high priest” (New York Times), the impact of his brilliant and entertaining writings, and how someone who never pitched a ball, held a bat, or managed a team fundamentally changed the way baseball is interpreted, analyzed, and even played. Bill James has been called “baseball’s shrewdest analyst” (Slate) and “part of baseball legend” (The New Yorker), and his Baseball Abstract has been acclaimed as the “holy book of baseball” (Chicago Tribune). Thirty years ago, James introduced a new approach to evaluating players and strategies, and now his theories have become indispensable tools for agents, statistics analysts, maverick general managers, and anyone who is serious about understanding the game.James began writing about baseball while working at a factory in his native Kansas. In lively, often acerbic prose, he used statistics to challenge entrenched beliefs and uncover surprising truths about the game. His annual Baseball Abstract captured the attention of fans and front offices and went on to become a bestselling staple of the baseball book category. In 2002, the Boston Red Sox hired James as an advisor. Two years later they achieved their long-awaited World Series triumph.The Mind of Bill James tells the story of how a gifted outsider inspired a new understanding of baseball. It delves deeply into James’s essential wisdom–including his surprising beliefs about pitch counts and the importance of batting-order, thoughts on professionalism and psychology, and why teams tend to develop the characteristics that are least favored by their home parks. It also brings together his best writing, much of it long out of print, as well as insights from new interviews. Written with James’ full cooperation, it is at once an eye-opening portrait of baseball’s virtuoso analyst and a treasury of his idiosyncratic genius.

Comments (7)
Nuadabandis
If there is any justice in the world of baseball, Bill James will be in the Hall of Fame some day. No one has had a greater influence on the nature of the sport over the last quarter-century. And when you consider James' roots, that opening statement becomes all the more remarkable.

James grew up in Kansas and started a freelance writing career on baseball in the 1970's that featured looking at baseball in an assortment of different ways. Now he's on the payroll of the Boston Red Sox, has thousands of disciples spread across the sports world, and has been quoted in a variety of other disciplines.

That sounds like more than adequate material for a biography, and Scott Gray has volunteered for the job. He's written "The Mind of Bill James," which no doubt will be savored by those same disciples.

James certainly is an unlikely candidate to start a revolution. He grew up in Mayetta, Kansas, which is as big as you think it is, a tall kid whose coordination couldn't catch up with his body. James also was smart with a mind that liked baseball and that liked to analyze problems by sifting through evidence.

After time at the University of Kansas and the Army, James started doing some research and writing on baseball. He started self-publishing something called Baseball Abstracts, essentially meaning he printed anything that struck him as interesting, in 1977. They sold a few copies, but the buyers were in some cases influential. James found himself involved in arbitration cases, gaining more freelance assignments, etc. Once Sports Illustrated ran a story on him in 1981, the secret was out. James got a book contract, and has written more several books since then.

Today, you can see James' footprints all over the way we look at the national pastime. No one used to count how many baserunners each catcher threw out. No one considered what ballparks did to a player's statistics. No one spent much time looking at how many walks a particular player gave or received. And so on.

James always has been a bit shy in some ways. Gray, an obvious fan, takes a different approach to the first part of the book. James always has included autobiographical references in his writing, and Gray uses them as part of the text. They are mixed in with information from James himself or from other sources. This actually works pretty well, surprisingly enough.

For about half the book, Gray has put together a fascinating tale. But then, just as it looks as if we're headed toward five-star land, the author runs out of gas just a bit. The chapters become filled with mini-essays on a variety of James-related subjects, but there wasn't much of a connecting theme in many cases.

In addition, a book like this almost requires outside sourcing. It would have been nice to have heard from some of those disciples who are in major league baseball today -- the second generation, if you will. It also would have been nice to have heard from a few of the members of the Red Sox front office to gain insight on his current work and influence. It's almost like James does secretive work for the government now.

Still, there's plenty of good information here. As "Freakonomics" proved, the man who looks at things from a different perspective can approach a form of genius. James has done that all his life, and it's fun to read about a person like that at length. "The Mind of Bill James" is an interesting place to visit.
snowball
I've been a Red Sox fan since I was 6 years old. My heart is held together by superglue, bailing wire, and duct tape it's been broken so many times. Sometime in the 1980 it got so bad I found I was no longer able to bear watching the games.* I could hardly stand to read the box scores the next morning.

When the players went on strike in 1994 my husband Bill and I more or less abandoned baseball. Bill did watch the World Series and he insisted I see the end of That Game in 2004 when the Sox finally won the series. But I was pretty sure my romance with baseball, which started back when I was watching Ted Williams and Carl Yastrzemski play left field was over.

Until this season when Bill bought season tickets to the Spokane Indians. They are an A- short season team, but they sparked the old flame and I've been following the Red Sox this year (as they proceeded to a 3 and 10 record early in the season, routinely leaving 11 or 15 men on and in one game leaving the bases loaded in three innings. Heartbreaking, just like old times.)

Since I'm one of those people who if they smell smoke immediately look for a book on firefighting (calling 911 can come later,) I needed to do some quality reading to catch up quickly on what has been going on for the last 17 years. And in that regard I was fortunate to have found a friend of a friend on Goodreads, Victor, who is a sports fan and avid reader of books on the subject. He gave me a short list of baseball books and I got started.

The Mind of Bill James was the first one on the list, and it's delightful reading as well as bringing me up to date on the new statistical revolution in baseball, a revolution that is more interested in the number of walks a player gets than in how many runs he bats in and that counts the plays made by outfielders instead of the number of errors. It's complicated but it makes sense and it may have something to do with the Red Sox and that miraculous 2004 season.

I have another three or four baseball books in the pipeline and I'm watching games again. However much baseball has changed, and it has changed dramatically since the late 40s, it's really still the same baseball it was when in my youth I used to lie in the hammock on summer afternoons and listen to Kurt Gowdy on the radio and score the games.

*One night shortly after I married Bill the Sox were ahead 3-2 in the 8th and I went to bed crying (and mystifying Bill.) I couldn't bear to watch the rest of the game. I knew what was going to happen. And of course it did. [Note: Bill tells me this was the famous Game Six of the 1986 World Series, the Buckner Game.]
Akta
Gotta love Bill James! He's diverse, down to earth and extremely intelligent! This covers his years as a youngster growing up in rural Kansas and travels the path of his education and career and ultimately the pinnacle of becoming the guru of baseball statistics!
Vudozilkree
In my early 20's I would visit the local bookstore every day in spring watching for the new Bill James "Baseball Abstract". I would read it from cover to cover the day it was released. As much as I loved James' insight on baseball, I was also engaged by his tangents and outlook on every day life. As I read "The Mind of Bill James", I realized how many of the principals I read about back then have stuck with me to this day. This book was a wonderful reminicance.
Unh
The magic of Bill James' statistical analysis of baseball is its easy accessibility. And it's just that same kind of readability that makes Scott Gray's book sparkle. The subject of sabermetrics always runs the risk of sounding like after-school homework. For Grey-and his subject, James-the tone is more like a fieldtrip to the ballpark. Some of the old-timers may not like it, but Bill James changed the way we understand baseball. And Scott Grey has provided us with a lively, entertaining, and smart way to understand James' importance to the sport. And where else are you going to learn why lemurs matter so much to the national pastime?