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by Michael Lewis

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Author: Michael Lewis
ISBN: 078625968X
Language: English
Pages: 467 pages
Category: Baseball
Publisher: Thorndike Press; 1 edition (December 15, 2003)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: docx doc azw lit
FB2 size: 1929 kb | EPUB size: 1664 kb | DJVU size: 1526 kb
Sub: Outdoors

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane.

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane. Its focus is the team's analytical, evidence-based, sabermetric approach to assembling a competitive baseball team despite Oakland's small budget. A film based on the book, starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill, was released in 2011.

They did win the pennant, but still fell short of winning a world championship. To my eye, they are a more complete offensive ballclub than Houston or Toronto and will be contenders again this year, but not because they hit a lot of home runs. So why is major league baseball so reluctant to embrace the philosophy of Moneyball?

Lewis (Liar's Poker; The New New Thing) examines how in 2002 the Oakland Athletics achieved a spectacular winning record .

Lewis (Liar's Poker; The New New Thing) examines how in 2002 the Oakland Athletics achieved a spectacular winning record while having the smallest player payroll of any major league baseball team. Given the heavily publicized salaries of players for teams like the Boston Red Sox or New York Yankees, baseball insiders and fans assume that the biggest talents deserve and get the biggest salaries. The rather ancient article is quite in line with what I learned from Moneyball: the amount of noise in the baseball stats is substantial and the players are a lot more similar to each other than it appears to the public and even the insiders.

Michael Lewis is the author of the bestsellers Liar's Poker and The New New Thing, among other books. He lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife, Tabitha Soren, and their two daughters. It looks like my background in Statistics, combined with what I learned from the book, made it impossible to enjoy the game the way millions of fans do. Nevertheless, I managed to derive a lot of value from Moneyball and I wish you the same.

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game. In his New York Times bestsellers Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Michael Lewis gave us an unprecedented look at what goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Now he takes us back across the centuries to explore the four classics that created and defined n. Coach: Lessons on the Game of Life. There was a turning point in Michael Lewis's life, in a baseball game when he was fourteen years old. The. Losers: The Road to Everyplace But the White House.

Michael Lewis' new book offers unique insights into building a winning team, even on a shoestring. Despite the disparity, the two teams tied for the best record in baseball, each winning 103 games, though both lost in the playoffs. The A's, as it happened, lost to the Twins, who paid their players just a smidgeon more than the A's. It has long been an article of faith among fans and team owners-especially small-market owners-that the poorer teams could not compete with the richer teams, at least not for long.

Moneyball: The Art of Wi. .has been added to your Cart

Moneyball: The Art of Wi.has been added to your Cart. Michael Lewis is the best-selling author of Liar's Poker, Moneyball, The Blind Side, The Big Short, and The Undoing Project. He lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife and three children. First, I'd like to thank Lewis for a book that is worth reading even for someone who has never learned the rules of the game and never will.

With these words Michael Lewis launches us into the funniest, smartest, and most contrarian book since, well, since . Moneyball by Michael Lewis is certainly a wonderful read

With these words Michael Lewis launches us into the funniest, smartest, and most contrarian book since, well, since. The logical places to look would be the front offices of major league teams, and the dugouts, perhaps even in the minds of the players themselves. Moneyball by Michael Lewis is certainly a wonderful read. The baseball fanatic that I am, I found the book to be a true delight as a peak behind the scenes of the world of baseball raft picks.

Moneyball is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. 98. The science of winning an unfair game. In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis follows the low-budget Oakland A's, visionary general manager Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball theorists.

Электронная книга "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game", Michael Lewis

Электронная книга "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game", Michael Lewis. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A New York Times Bestseller

The funniest, smartest, and most contrarian book since Lewis's Liar's Poker, Moneyball is a quest for something as elusive as the Holy Grail, something that money apparently can't buy: the secret of success in baseball.

Comments (7)
Pedar
Read this book only if you are prepared to realize that much of what you thought you knew about baseball is nonsense. This book is an amazing eye-opener about a then radical new way of managing a pro baseball team that allowed the dirt-poor Oakland A's to win as many games as the fat-cat NY Yankees. Using detailed statistical analysis created by baseball fans like Bill James who wanted to know how to make better teams in their fantasy baseball leagues, Oakland GM Billy Beane drafted or traded for players other teams considered sub-standard or worn-out and Oakland became a post-season threat despite having the second lowest payroll in the major leagues. Although the baseball establishment reacted with horror and contempt to having its time-honored methods of choosing players challenged, the approach used in Moneyball has been widely adopted by many teams including the Boston Red Sox who won the World Series shortly after doing so. Since reading this book I laugh every time I hear an announcer use the phrase, "productive out", knowing that over the long haul it's teams that don't trade outs for bases that win more games. The Moneyball approach remains controversial with many fans and baseball industry insiders--it's more fun to watch someone bunt a runner to second than it is to watch that hitter draw a walk--but the numbers show that over time the walks are more valuable to a team. Regardless of how much you agree with Bill James and Billy Beane, this is a terrific book that will make you really think about how the game of baseball works.
Hellmaster
Very interesting book that flies by. It is so easy to read that you can almost pardon's Michael Lewis' penchant for perpetuating the hyperbole of others and contributing exaggeration of his own. You can easily see how the added flair and drama makes the book more interesting for a mass audience. You can also excuse the fact that the book doesn't actually point out the answer to the original question. Why were the Oakland A's able to win so many games on a small budget? It turns out that was a little bit of skill but mostly luck. They got lucky with their pre-moneyball pitchers Zito, Mulder and Hudson.

Despite the fact that Lewis doesn't highlight this anti-climactic conclusion on his own, the book still has enough information for the reader to get there. It is ironic that this parallels the reason Bill James' departed from Baseball Abstract and that is mentioned in the book. There is too much focus on the details that don't matter. The high level narrative and explanation are more important. Budget matters. You can get a slight advantage by exploiting inefficiencies but this takes a long time to prove out due to limited data points the out-sized impact luck has. There are lots of little nuggets of information like that hiding in this book that make it worth reading.
Uttegirazu
Terrific read. For some reason, I didn't read it until 2016. It has a different perspective now after 13 years. We have already seen the affects of Moneyball and Sabermetrics on baseball. Theo Epstein seems to be the greatest beneficiary of the theory, the man who used sabermetrics and had a budget to spend. Two World Series victories, one for the Red Sox and another for the Cubs after many decades of losing. The Cubs didn't win the World Series in 2016; Theo Epstein was the winner. I liked reading Moneyball to follow the theories and careers of those who were the big players in the book. The afterward by Lewis gives a lot of insight into the reaction of baseball's old boy network, the old guard who rejected change.
Opithris
Moneyball will go down as one of my favorite books. Lewis does an incredible job putting the reader in the As organization. I felt like I was there as this story happened. I experienced all range of emotions (including tears and laughter) as I read through the pages. This was one of those books that you don't want to put down. If you've seen the movie already...read the book! The stories not captured by the movie are so emotional and entertaining. At the end of the book your left with the feeling that there are multiple was to value people and things in your life. Some people will hate you for your views but it doesn't mean you should change yourself or your views. Go out and prove your right.