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by S.E. Abram

Download Cancer Pain (Current Management of Pain) fb2
Author: S.E. Abram
ISBN: 0898383897
Language: English
Pages: 192 pages
Category: Medicine & Health Sciences
Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (January 31, 1989)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lit txt azw lrf
FB2 size: 1189 kb | EPUB size: 1352 kb | DJVU size: 1542 kb
Sub: Other

Most chronic (long-lasting) pain is caused by the illness and most acute (short-term) pain is caused by treatment or diagnostic procedures. However, radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy may produce painful conditions that persist long after treatment has ended.

Cancer Pain (Current Management of Pain). 0898383897 (ISBN13: 9780898383898).

Updated guidelines for breakthrough cancer pain, bone and neuropathic pain are included.

New recommendations are given for the key pain assessment question, step 2 of the analgesic ladder and for ketamine and cannabinoid use. Updated guidelines for breakthrough cancer pain, bone and neuropathic pain are included. Download the PDF from Annals of Oncology.

The principles of cancer-related pain management are straightforward. Effective management of cancer-related pain can be accomplished by local healthcare providers, including oncologists and family physicians. More complex cancer pain syndromes may require the coordination of multidisciplinary professionals, including pain medicine specialists and palliative care and hospice care providers. Meticulous attention to management of controlled substances in the home is needed to prevent abuse and diversion.

Pain is a major symptom in 70% of patients with advanced cancer. Radiotherapy Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy in the Management of Cancer

Pain is a major symptom in 70% of patients with advanced cancer. Half of all patients undergoing anticancer therapy experience pain. It has been estimated by members of the World Health Organization that 3. 5 million people worldwide suffer from cancer pain. Radiotherapy Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy in the Management of Cancer. 49. The Role of NonNeurolytic Blocks in the Management of Cancer Pain.

Cancer pain management-current status. Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for. severe pain. 81820 · Source: PubMed. The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance. abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills.

Journal of Pain & Symptom Management 4:31-33, 1989 2. Aguilar JL, Montes A, Samper D, Roca G, Vidal F: Interpleural analgesia through a DuPen catheter for lung cancer pain. Cancer 70:2621-2623, 1992 3. Ahlgren FI, Ahlgren MB: Epidural administration of opiates by a new device

Journal of Pain & Symptom Management 4:31-33, 1989 2. Ahlgren FI, Ahlgren MB: Epidural administration of opiates by a new device. Pain 31:353-357, 1987 4. Ali NM, Hanna N, Hoffman JS: Percutaneous epidural catheterization for intractable pain in terminal cancer patients.

Mercadante S: Pain treatment and outcomes for patients with advanced cancer who receive follow-up care at. .McMillan SC, Tittle M: A descriptive study of the management of pain and pain related side effects in a cancer center and a hospice

Mercadante S: Pain treatment and outcomes for patients with advanced cancer who receive follow-up care at home. Cancer 1999, 85:1849–1858. McMillan SC, Tittle M: A descriptive study of the management of pain and pain related side effects in a cancer center and a hospice. Hospice J 1995, 10:89–107. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. 18. Nowels D, Lee JT: Cancer pain management in home hospice settings: a comparison of primary care and oncologic physicians. J Palliat Care 1999, 15:5–9. PubMedGoogle Scholar. 19. Storey P: Alternative routes for administering analgesics at home.

Cancer pain can be a complication of cancer or its treatment, and can negatively affect the .

Cancer pain can be a complication of cancer or its treatment, and can negatively affect the functional status and quality of life of cancer patients. Get comprehensive, practical information on the screening, assessment, and management of cancer-related pain in this summary for clinicians. A commonly used approach to pain management employs the World Health Organization (WHO) pain relief ladder, which categorizes pain intensity according to severity and recommends analgesic agents based on their strength.

The diagnosis of cancer inspires fear, in part because of the high mortality rate associated with most malignancies, and in part because of the perception that cancer is a painful disease. Recently compiled statistics tend to support patients' fears. Pain is a major symptom in 70% of patients with advanced cancer [1]. Half of all patients undergoing anticancer therapy experience pain [2]. It has been estimated by members of the World Health Organization that 3. 5 million people worldwide suffer from cancer pain. One study of the severity of cancer pain estimates that pain is moderate to severe in 50% of cancer pain patients, very severe or excruciating in 30% [3]. An analysis of several reports of patients in developed countries estimates that 50-80% of patients had inadequate relief [2]. In underdeveloped countries, adequacy of treatment may be far lower because of lack of availability of medical facilities and legal constraints on the use of potent narcotics. The picture need not be this bleak. The reality is that, for most patients, cancer pain is relatively easy to control with simple, inexpensive measures. Several studies have indicated that cancer pain can be well controlled with oral morphine in over 90% of patients [4,5]. Long-acting orally effective opiate preparations such as time­ release morphine, methadone, and levorphanol allow patients to sleep comfortably through the night. When the oral route is impossible, narcotics can be administered rectally or by intravenous or subcutaneous infusion.