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by D.F. Pears,B.F. McGuinness,Bertrand Russell,Ludwig Wittgenstein

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Author: D.F. Pears,B.F. McGuinness,Bertrand Russell,Ludwig Wittgenstein
ISBN: 0710030045
Language: English
Pages: 207 pages
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Routledge and Kegan Paul (March 31, 1962)
Rating: 4.8
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FB2 size: 1100 kb | EPUB size: 1806 kb | DJVU size: 1407 kb
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McGuinness ; and with an introduction by Bertrand Russell.

International library of philosophy and scientific method. Browse related items.

Tractatus : the German text of Ludwig Wittgenstein's he Abhandlung, with a new translation by . McGuinness ; and with the introduction by Bertrand Russell Routledge & K. Paul London 1961. Australian/Harvard Citation. {Citation title Tractatus : the German text of Ludwig Wittgenstein's he Abhandlung, with a new translation by . International library of philosophy and scientific method.

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Similar books and articles he Abhandlung : With a New Translation. Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1961 - Routledge Humanities. Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1963 - Routledge and Kegan Paul. Tractatus he Abhandlung. The German Text of Ludwig Wittgenstein's he Abhandlung with a New Translation by D. F. Pears and B. McGuinness and with the Introduction by Bertrand Russell, F. R. S. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. Canada: British Book Service.

Tractatus by Ludwig Wittgenstein, 1961 .

Tractatus by Ludwig Wittgenstein, 1961, Routledge & Kegan Paul. Are you sure you want to remove Tractatus from your list? Tractatus. Pears & R. McGuinness ; and with the introduction by Bertrand Russell. by Ludwig Wittgenstein. Published 1961 by Routledge & Kegan Paul.

1 B renders Wittgenstein's die gesamte Naturwissenschaft by the whole of natural science, but .

1 B renders Wittgenstein's die gesamte Naturwissenschaft by the whole of natural science, but one wonders whether any purpose is served by the adjective. The German Naturwissenschaft corresponds quite accurately to the English science : the German n are not commonly referred to as sciences at all. 2 The thinking, presenting subject; there is no such thing. B is as crisp as the German original: There is no such thing as the subject that thinks or entertains ideas.

he Abhandlung (International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method).

Tractatus : The German Text of Ludwig Wittgenstein's he Abhandlung (International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method). Perhaps the most important work of philosophy written in the twentieth century, the Tractatus first appeared in 1921 and was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme compression and brilliance, it immediately convinced many of its readers and captivated the imagination of all.

Canada: British Book Service.

The German Text of Ludwig Wittgenstein's he Abhandlung with a new Translation by D. Published: 1 September 1962. by Cambridge University Press (CUP).

Tractatus he Abhandlung By Ludwig Wittgenstein. First published by Kegan Paul (London), 1922. Introduction By Bertrand Russell, F. M R. W ITTGENSTEIN ’ S Tractatus, whether or not it prove to give the ultimate truth on the matters with which it deals, certainly deserves, by its breadth and scope and profundity, to be considered an important event in the philosophical world.

he Abhandlung Bertrand Russell's article "The Philosophy of Logical Atomism" is presented as a working out o. .

Wittgenstein wrote the notes for the Tractatus while he was a soldier during World War I and completed it during a military leave in the summer of 1918. It was first published in German in 1921 as he Abhandlung. The Tractatus was influential chiefly amongst the logical positivist philosophers of the Vienna Circle, such as Rudolf Carnap and Friedrich Waismann The Tractatus employs an austere and succinct literary.

Perhaps the most important work of philosophy written in the twentieth century, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus first appeared in 1921 and was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme compression and brilliance, it immediately convinced many of its readers and captivated the imagination of all. Its chief influence, at first, was on the Logical Positivists of the 1920s and 30s, but many other philosophers were stimulated by its philosophy of language, finding attractive, if ultimately unsatisfactory, its view that propositions were pictures of reality. Perhaps most of all, Wittgenstein himself, after his return to philosophy in the late 1920s, was fascinated by its vision of an inexpressible, crystalline world of logical relationships. The posthumous publication of other writings has, therefore, only served to reawaken interest in the Tractatus and to illuminate its more neglected aspects.David Pears and Brian McGuinness revised their translation in the light of Wittgenstein's own suggestions and comments in his correspondence with C.K. Ogden about the first translation. In addition, this edition contains the introduction by Bertrand Russell which appeared in the original English translation.
Comments (7)
Frosha
In Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, Wittgenstein “deals with the problems of philosophy and shows … that the method of formulating these problems rests on the misunderstanding of the logic of our language.”

Hence, the author demonstrates that the solution to most philosophic problems becomes a critical method of linguistic analysis.

Tractatus begins with ontology and the state of affairs of the world is described. From there the book deals largely with the question of how language works and how it can describe the world accurately. Many forms of language (e.g. names and propositions) reflect different objective parts of reality (e.g. objects and facts). Logic is then discussed as it pertains to tautologies, contradictions and propositions. From this claim stems the conclusion that that the laws of science are not logical “laws,” but a means that we use to express reality—hence, science does not in fact explain our world but merely describes it.

Although the author embraces logic, he ironically ventures into the mystical on many occasions. Some of such highlights of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus include the proposal that most philosophical propositions are senseless (4.003), the relativity of “free” will and the lack of inner necessity of causality (5.1362), and the inability to recognize either the truth or falsehood from non-logical propositions. Wittgenstein brilliantly elaborates on widely accepted, yet wholly non-certain, everyday happenings (6.363II to 6.372) and clarifies that all ethics is transcendental (6.42I). In effect, the author posits that morality is in fact objective because subjective morality stems from happenstance, and is therefore meaningless.

All potential readers should be acutely aware that this book is a very, very tough read. You may find yourself taking several minutes to read through one short page and then several hours to digest what it is you in fact just read. Either way, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is a terse, powerful, enigmatic and notable in its ability to whisk the dormant imagination into shape. The intellectual ramifications of being able to fully grasp and comprehend the material are limitless.
Adokelv
Amazing read, and recommendable. Wittgenstein tried to spell out precisely what a logically constructed language can (and cannot) be used to say. Its seven basic propositions simply state that language, thought, and reality share a common structure, fully expressible in logical terms.On Wittgenstein's view, the world consists entirely of facts. (Tractatus 1.1) Human beings are aware of the facts by virtue of our mental representations or thoughts, which are most fruitfully understood as picturing the way things are. (Tractatus 2.1) These thoughts are, in turn, expressed in propostitions, whose form indicates the position of these facts within the nature of reality as a whole and whose content presents the truth-conditions under which they correspond to that reality. (Tractatus 4) Everything that is true—that is, all the facts that constitute the world—can in principle be expressed by atomic sentences. Imagine a comprehensive list of all the true sentences. They would picture all of the facts there are, and this would be an adequate representation of the world as a whole. Tractatus, however, not only provides a way to structure our knowledge about the world, but also provokes to develop a critical contradiction with a non-factual or emotioanl sphere of human nature.
Perongafa
I consider this book to be very worth reading because it is associated with an extremely important period in philosophy following the work of Frege, Russell and Whitehead. I found it to be very opaque. Wittgenstein seemed to be struggling with ideas he encountered while considering the work of Frege, Russell and Whitehead. The preface by Russell showed that he considered the work to be very significant. I intend to study more about this, and will probably revise this review later. For now, I would recommend reading the Tractatus, but I did not understand it very well.

I think that a primary aim of Wittgenstein in the Tractatus was to address Russell's paradox and other problems of the "language" of logic, as being developed by Frege, Russell and Whitehead at that time. This led him into deep waters with respect to the mysteries of language, and a seeming necessity to set limits, even if these limits were somewhat arbitrary. Certainly some of his insights in this regard were highly penetrating. In particular, he viewed transgressing limits where truth could be adequately assessed as entering a realm of nonsense. I feel that had Gödel's work been available at the time, Wittgenstein might have thought somewhat differently about the limits he perceived. On the other hand, Wittgenstein ignored this work later in the more mature phases of his thinking. I came away from the Tractatus feeling that while it is still of great importance, especially as it was at a historical nexus in the evolution of logic, and displays some profound insights, time has somewhat passed it by.
saafari
One of the most influential books of the first half of the twentieth century and alongside Philosophical Investigations sets the standard for analytical philosophy's immense influence on modern theory. Wittgenstein basically demolishes metaphysical pretensions that derive from the reification of language.
Nidor
This appears to be the product of a poor scan and OCR. There are multiple typos per page. Why does this matter more than usual? It's Wittgentein, and he was all about how ideas can and cannot be expressed in language. By introducing errors like this, it renders it almost unreadable.