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by Christina Fink

Download Living Silence in Burma: Surviving under Military Rule, Second Edition fb2
Author: Christina Fink
ISBN: 1848132719
Language: English
Pages: 320 pages
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Zed Books; New edition (August 15, 2009)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: doc lrf txt rtf
FB2 size: 1720 kb | EPUB size: 1729 kb | DJVU size: 1725 kb
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Living Silence in Burma: Surviving under Military Rule.

Living Silence in Burma: Surviving under Military Rule. While other countries have democratized and prospered, Burma is governed by a repressive military dictatorship and is the second largest producer of heroin in the world.

The adjective that best describes Christina Fink’s revised and. updated book, Living Silence in Burma, is compelling. tive - at once readable and scholarly - tells the story of the. Burmese people and their struggle for survival in a way no other. scholar or student of Burma/Myanmar and its contemporary history. leading up to and lingering after the democracy movement of.

Living Silence in Burma book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Living Silence in Burma: Surviving under Military Rule as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Christina Fink's Living Silence is a meticulous study of the surreal horror imposed upon the people of Burma by its illegitimate rulers. Read this book and never forget them.

Living Silence is particularly valuable for its study of the psychological effects of military rule on the people of Burma. The real struggle in Burma is the struggle between the desire to opt for the easy option of submitting to the demands of the powers that be and the commitment that leads to the hard road of resisting the threats and blandishments of a ruthless regime. Christina Fink's Living Silence is a meticulous study of the surreal horror imposed upon the people of Burma by its illegitimate rulers. Publication Date: 30 July 2009 324 pages.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. During the writing of Living Silence she was visiting scholar at UC Berkeley and was supported by an Open Society Institute Individual Project Fellowship. She has been a consulting anthropologist for the Dreaming of Kawthoolei documentary film project, and Thailand representative for the Open Society Institute's Burma Project.

In other words, we must go with the flow line. The regime has also exploited traditions of respect for authority to exercise its control over communities. In the civil war areas, communities have been uprooted and destroyed because of the tatmadaw’s counter-insurgency techniques, which focus on removing civilian support for resistance armies.

While other countries have democratized and prospered, Burma is governed by a repressive military dictatorship and is the second largest producer of heroin in the world.

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Increasing numbers of Burmese live and work abroad. This is a book anyone with an interest in Burma needs to read.

Through extensive interviews conducted inside and outside the country she builds a richly textured picture of how people cope with their daily life - and some innovative forms of resistance. In recent years, international engagement with Burma has grown. Increasing numbers of Burmese live and work abroad.

This new, thoroughly updated, edition of Christina Fink’s acclaimed account gives powerful insights into the life of ordinary Burmese people. Through extensive interviews conducted inside and outside the country she builds a richly textured picture of how people cope with their daily life -- and some innovative forms of resistance. In recent years, international engagement with Burma has grown. Increasing numbers of Burmese live and work abroad. Can the regime sustain itself in the face of the economic deterioration at home? The brutal repression of demonstrations in 2007 was a desperate response to a political opposition better informed and more united than ever before. This is a book anyone with an interest in Burma needs to read.
Comments (2)
snowball
This is the best book I've read on Burma in a long time and I've read a few. I've read a lot about ancient history but not too much about how life is under military rule. Being an outsider Christina Fink was able to have a more balanced view of what is happening. I have a much better understanding of what life is like there.
I had lived there in the early seventies but had very little interaction with Burmans. I wondered why then and I've wondered why since. Fink explained it so I understood.
I appreciated the Author's note on Burmese prefixes and Acronyms. I would have been lost without it. Lastly, the notes, bibliography and index were also helpful. It's good to find a scholarly text that makes clear and understandable reading. This is a good book, well worth reading.
Roru
A truly unique book in the field of Burma Studies. There has been a lot written about the Burmese government (The State in Myanmar), human rights and Aung San Suu Kyi (Perfect Hostage: A Life of Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma's Prisoner of Conscience), and ethnic minorities (Burma: Curse of Independence), but surprisingly little scholarly work about the lives of the average Burmese citizen (Emma Larkin's excellent Finding George Orwell in Burma is more of a journalist's account). Christina Fink's Living Silence in Burma: Surviving under Military Rule, Second Edition fills this gap. Even after 8 years, it remains the premier work one everyday life in the majority of the country.

The book first covers the country's history, particularly the socialist era (which many modern books tend to glance over). Fink then dedicates chapters to aspects of modern life, such as religion, schools, families, and the military. The book shows how the government has infiltrated almost every aspect of society. Teachers have to struggle between educating students and spying on them for the military. Monks worry that up to a tenth of all fellow monks may work for the military. During a referendum in 1973 to approve a new constitution, soldiers stood watch as voters put their votes in a "yes" or "no" box - the latter was discouraged. Overall, this book isn't like a human rights report, describing a few major outrages, but rather is more subtle. It details the many minor outrages that build up and eventually overwhelm daily life in the country. Unfortunately, the pessimism described in the book matches my observations while I've been in the country.

Definitely worth buying if you're interested in Burma at all. Despite being an academic work, this is an eminently readable account.

Note: This edition has been updated with an additional chapter to cover developments since 2001.