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by William G. Howell

Download The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat (Chicago Series on International and Domestic Institutions) fb2
Author: William G. Howell
ISBN: 022604825X
Language: English
Pages: 368 pages
Category: Humanities
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (August 14, 2013)
Rating: 4.6
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FB2 size: 1910 kb | EPUB size: 1918 kb | DJVU size: 1976 kb
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William G. Howell is the Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and .

William G. Howell is the Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and professor of political science in the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author or coauthor of several books, including, most recently, Thinking about the Presidency: The Primacy of Power and While Dangers Gather: Congressional Checks on Presidential War Powers. William Howell, Saul Jackman, and Jon Rogowski's The Wartime President (2013) presents the most sophisticated and nuanced revision of Aaron Wildavsky's Two Presidencies thesis to date.

Chicago Series on International and Domestic Institutions. offers a genuinely novel way to think about the wartime presidency. The book is likely to become an important reference point for those working on interbranch bargaining in the US political system. Journal of American History.

The balance of power between Congress and the president has been a. .

The balance of power between Congress and the president has been a powerful thread throughout American political thought since. While this is most apparent in military (Howell, Jackman and Rogowski 2013) and intelligence (Zegart 2011) affairs, presidents' preeminence in foreign policy provides them with the opportunity to act on particularistic incentives. Presidential Particularism and US Trade Politics.

The Wartime President - William G. Howell. The wartime president. Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat. William G. Howell, Saul P. Jackman, and Jon C. Rogowski. The university of chicago press. Chicago series on international and domestic institutions. Other books in the series. Howell is the Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and professor of political.

The balance of power between Congress and the president has been a powerful thread throughout American political thought since the time of the Founding Fathers. And yet, for all that has been written on the topic, we still lack a solid empirical or theoretical justification for Hamilton’s proposition.

Howell recently published two books, one with coauthors Saul Jackman and Jon Rogowski entitled The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat (University of Chicago Press, 2013); an.

Howell recently published two books, one with coauthors Saul Jackman and Jon Rogowski entitled The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat (University of Chicago Press, 2013); and the other, with David Brent, entitled Thinking about the Presidency: The Primacy of Power (Princeton University Press, 2013). He also is the co-author (with Jon Pevehouse) of While.

The Wartime President book Published August 2nd 2013 by University of Chicago Press (first published January 1st 2013).

The Wartime President book. OC It is the nature of war to increase the executive at the expense. The balance of power between Congress and the president has been a powerful thread throughout American political thought since the time of the Founding Fathers. And yet, for all that has been written on the topic, we still OC It is the nature of war to increase the executive at the expense of the legislative authority, OCO wrote Alexander Hamilton in the Federalist Papers. Published August 2nd 2013 by University of Chicago Press (first published January 1st 2013).

By William G. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013. The Wartime President does not disagree-but it does argue that this effect has been assumed, rather than analyzed, and its contingencies rarely explored. 344 pp. "War made the state," Charles Tilly famously declaimed; "and the state made wa. In their rich new work, William Howell, Saul Jackman, and Jon Rogowski shift this proposition slightly on its axis. Under what conditions does war allow the president to get more of what he wants, to what extent, and-crucially-why? Are all wars, and all presidents, created equal? Is there variance even within a given war?

In their new book, The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the .

In their new book, The Wartime President: Executive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat (University of Chicago Press, 2013), William Howell . Saul Jackman, and Jon Rogowski offer new theories and evidence that explain why members of Congress lend greater support to presidents’ policy agendas in wartime, particularly World War II and the post-9/11 wars, than during peace. The authors also contend that other wars, such as Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf wars, had a more measured effect on domestic policy, raising further questions about the relationship between domestic and foreign policy spheres.

Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2013. URL: ectives-on-politics. Your name Please enter your name. Stephen Benedict Dyson (a1). aUniversity of Connecticut. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 22 December 2014.

“It is the nature of war to increase the executive at the expense of the legislative authority,” wrote Alexander Hamilton in the Federalist Papers. The balance of power between Congress and the president has been a powerful thread throughout American political thought since the time of the Founding Fathers. And yet, for all that has been written on the topic, we still lack a solid empirical or theoretical justification for Hamilton’s proposition.            For the first time, William G. Howell, Saul P. Jackman, and Jon C. Rogowski systematically analyze the question. Congress, they show, is more likely to defer to the president’s policy preferences when political debates center on national rather than local considerations. Thus, World War II and the post-9/11 wars in Afghanistan and Iraq significantly augmented presidential power, allowing the president to enact foreign and domestic policies that would have been unattainable in times of peace. But, contrary to popular belief, there are also times when war has little effect on a president’s influence in Congress. The Vietnam and Gulf Wars, for instance, did not nationalize our politics nearly so much, and presidential influence expanded only moderately.            Built on groundbreaking research, The Wartime President offers one of the most significant works ever written on the wartime powers presidents wield at home.