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by David S. Foglesong

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Author: David S. Foglesong
ISBN: 0807822280
Language: English
Pages: 400 pages
Category: Humanities
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (November 20, 1995)
Rating: 4.6
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FB2 size: 1326 kb | EPUB size: 1844 kb | DJVU size: 1900 kb
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Home Browse Books Book details, America's Secret War against Bolshevism: . From the Russian revolutions of 1917 to the end of the Civil War in 1920, Woodrow Wilson's administration sought to oppose the Bolsheviks in a variety of covert ways.

Home Browse Books Book details, America's Secret War against Bolshevism: . America's Secret War against Bolshevism: . Intervention in the Russian Civil War, 1917-1920. By David S. Foglesong.

This is solid academic history. and Allied military intervention in Russia in 1918. Lloyd E. Ambrosius, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

David Foglesong, who teaches at Rutgers University, has written a most interesting book on . According to Foglesong, Lansing had longed for a military dictatorship since August 1917, when tsarist General L. G. Kornilov attempted to establish one. Since the 1890s Lansing had "sought to prevent a populist rabble from grabbing power in the United States" (pp. 88, 112, 151).

Start by marking America's Secret War Against Bolshevism: .  . Intervention in the Russian Civil War, 1917-1920 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Fo From the Russian revolutions of 1917 to the end of the Civil War in 1920, Woodrow Wilson's administration sought to oppose the Bolsheviks in a variety of covert ways.

From the Russian revolutions of 1917 to the end of the Civil War in 1920, Woodrow Wilson's administration sought .

From the Russian revolutions of 1917 to the end of the Civil War in 1920, Woodrow Wilson's administration sought to oppose the Bolsheviks in a variety of covert ways. Foglesong explores the evolution of Wilson's ambivalent attitudes toward socialism and revolution before 1917 and analyzes the social and cultural origins of American anti-Bolshevism.

By David S. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995. Christine A. White (a1). Pennsylvania State University.

The stated goals were to help the Czechoslovak Legion, to secure supplies of munitions and armaments in Russian ports, and to re-establish the Eastern Front. Overthrow of the new Bolshevik regime was an additional, covert motivation. After the Bolshevik government withdrew from World War I, the Allied Powers openly backed the anti-communist White forces in Russia.

FOGLESONG, DAVID S. (Author) University of North Carolina Press (Publisher) The czech legion in the russian CIVIL war, 1917-1920. The czech legion in the russian CIVIL war, 1917-1920. (Author) University of North Carolina Press (Publisher). operation by and against the interventionist forces in the region of murmansk 1918-1919. political history, general. intelligence work, espionage. At war with the Bolsheviks the Allied intervention into Russia 1917-1920. Imperial War Museums home Connect with IWM.

America's Secret War against Bolshevism: . Intervention in the Russian Civil War, 1917–1920. An author of numerous books on Russia and Chechnya, John Dunlop dedicates this study to examining the management by Russian authorities of the two main hostage crises since the beginning of the second war in Chechnya in 1999. The first part analyses the Beslan hostage-taking in September 2004, in which more than 1000 persons, mainly children, were detained in a school in a small in North Ossetian.

From the Russian revolutions of 1917 to the end of the Civil War in 1920, Woodrow Wilson's administration sought to oppose the Bolsheviks in a variety of covert ways. Drawing on previously unavailable American and Russian archival material, David Foglesong chronicles both sides of this secret war and reveals a new dimension to the first years of the U.S.-Soviet rivalry. Foglesong explores the evolution of Wilson's ambivalent attitudes toward socialism and revolution before 1917 and analyzes the social and cultural origins of American anti-Bolshevism. Constrained by his espousal of the principle of self-determination, by idealistic public sentiment, and by congressional restrictions, Wilson had to rely on secretive methods to affect the course of the Russian Civil War. The administration provided covert financial and military aid to anti-Bolshevik forces, established clandestine spy networks, concealed the purposes of limited military expeditions to northern Russia and Siberia, and delivered ostensibly humanitarian assistance to soldiers fighting to overthrow the Soviet government. In turn, the Soviets developed and secretly funded a propaganda campaign in the United States designed to mobilize public opposition to anti-Bolshevik activity, promote American-Soviet economic ties, and win diplomatic recognition from Washington.
Comments (7)
Hatе&love
Few outside the historical research community are even aware the US and other Allied nations were involved in Russian/Soviet affairs just after the Bolshevik revolution. At best it's a historical footnote. At worst, the history of this event has been intentionally neglected to preserve the image that the US has never lost a war.

It's time we acknowledge our attempt to destabilize the fledgling Soviet regime just after it took power during the latter stages of World War I. Given these events, later Soviet fear regarding the intentions of the US and other Western democracies is understandable. We'd tried to interfere in their affairs once, why wouldn't we try again?

Read the book and understand why America's actions haven't always been as clean and above board as its citizens have been led to believe.
Cyregaehus
I never knew that the United States had sent troops to the USSR, a so called ally, during their revolution
Vizil
Very good and important book, that everybody should read. If you can handle the truth about the EVIL that Americ is causing to Russia, you should read this book. If you enjoy being ignorant and living a lie, then dont read this book.
Zeli
excellent book
Jeyn
Most Americans today are probably not aware that President Woodrow Wilson sent troops to Russia during that country's civil war in an attempt to nip Bolshevism in the bud. In "America's Secret War Against Bolshevism," author David Foglesong chronicles our unavailing effort to stop the establishment of Communism in what became the Soviet Union.

Wilson rightly saw Bolshevism as a menace to the world, and Foglesong recalls the president's reasoning as to why. Wilson thought that intervention in Russia passed a cost-benefit analysis, but there was a tension between his general foreign policy belief in self-determination and wisely making an exception in the case of what would ultimately metastasize into world Communism. The author covers all of the reasons for intervention and the methods, economic and intelligence as well as military, used.

The president was hemmed in by factors such as American public opinion and the possible response of the Germans at the close of World War I. However, troops were ultimately sent to Siberia and North Russia. Foglesong recalls the role that the British, Japanese, and Czechs played in the intervention, describes the trajectory of events before the ultimate withdrawal of Allied troops, and offers his opinion on the efficacy of the operation.

President Wilson was correct in believing that the end of the Bolshevik regime was inevitable, but the Soviet government killed millions, forced the rest of the population to "live" in terror, and remained a purulent blight on the earth for most of the rest of the century. Winston Churchill was, as was often the case, foresighted and called for greater intervention.

While it would have been worth it to strangle Communism before it really got established, it is understandable to see how the war-weary Western nations in 1918 and 1919 might not have agreed. "America's Secret War Against Bolshevism" is a definitive account of this little-known episode in the history of the twentieth century.
Fordredor
This is important book which shed much light on the origins of the cold war and will probably do much to hurt Wilson's reputation. Based on 128 sets of private and governmental papers, coming from archives from three countries, Foglesong's book show a story of deceit and self-deception. Wilson has sometimes been seen as sympathetic to the cause of Russian freedom; indeed he has been sometimes seen as sympathetic to the Bolsheviks(for example by Richard Pipes, in The Russian Revolution). Quite false, for Foglesong shows how Wilson combined his trademark moralism, no less sincerely believed in for being trite and shallow, with working with reactionairies and militarist whites to crush the revolution.
Foglesong starts off with a chapter on Wilson's illusions in Mexico, during which American officials sought to use Japanese agents to poison Pancho Villa. The next chapter looks at the origins of American Anti-bolshevism; Foglesong looks at it a melange of Wilson, Lansing and the American elite's salon style anti-socialist chatter, its nativists prejudices, and its smug puritanism. We go on to see how this influenced American Anti-Communist propaganda, with its fatuous anti-atheism and its fear of racial equality. A passage on the State Department's susceptibility to the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and choice comments from Lansing and Hoover are, as they, well worth the price of reading alone. But this is only the beginning. The United States completely failed to recognize that Russia had no choice but to leave the war; bullying the desperate Provisional Government was the last thing it needed and helped make its collapse inevitable. Wilson and Lansing supported the Cossack Kaledin, unaware that the cause of his Volunteer Army was hopeless. Wilson and Lansing constantly used secrecy and subversion, keeping the American public in the dark. The state department was contemptous of the left-wing Socialist Revolutionaries (SRs) the winner of the elections to the Constituent assembly and, as Geoffrey Swain has provocatively argued, the only group who could have possibly stopped the Bolsheviks. Instead Americans on the scene talked of favoring a "military dictatorship," and shed no tears when the SRs were overthrown by Admiral Kolchak, whose gross inadequacies as a leader have to be read in the invaluable monograph by Jon Smele to be believed. The Americans used food as a weapon, used the defeated Germans to prevent the Soviets from reoccupying the Baltic States, and indulged in further illusions about the incompetent and brutal Iudenitch.
Foglesong writes in a dry matter, but he is well worth reading. In the end he is quite successful in showing that far from making the world safe for democracy and for open diplomacy, Wilson's activities were a major stage in the creation of "secret wars." Quite unsuccessful the first time, the same methods of secrecy, rhetorical support for democracy, hard support for vicious, reactionary and incompetent rulers would be used again and again in the future.