» » Queer

Download Queer fb2

by William S. Burroughs

Download Queer fb2
Author: William S. Burroughs
ISBN: 0141189916
Language: English
Pages: 208 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books; 25th Anniversary ed edition (November 1, 2010)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: doc txt lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1727 kb | EPUB size: 1737 kb | DJVU size: 1684 kb

William Seward Burroughs II (/ˈbʌroʊz/; February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997) was an American writer and visual artist.

William Seward Burroughs II (/ˈbʌroʊz/; February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997) was an American writer and visual artist. Burroughs was a primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author whose influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature. Burroughs wrote eighteen novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays. Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences

Queer is an early short novel (written between 1951 and 1953, published in 1985) by William S. Burroughs. It is partially a sequel to his earlier novel, Junkie, which ends with the stated ambition of finding a drug called Yage

Queer is an early short novel (written between 1951 and 1953, published in 1985) by William S. It is partially a sequel to his earlier novel, Junkie, which ends with the stated ambition of finding a drug called Yage. Queer, although not devoted to that quest, does include a trip to South America looking for the substance.

Queer" is the sequel to William Burroughs' seminal work "Junky," which set a sort of standard for novels based .

Queer" is the sequel to William Burroughs' seminal work "Junky," which set a sort of standard for novels based around al addiction and post-drug use malaise. However "Queer" isn't about Burroughs' avatar Lee's continuing addiction to heroin, but rather some of the weird experiences he has down in Mexico and later the depths of South America while spending time with a man he's become obsessed with named Allerton.

Queer William S. Burroughs Queer by William S. Burroughs Introduction When I lived in Mexico City at the end of the 1940's, it was . Bill paid for my books and tuition, and a per-month living allowance

Queer William S. Burroughs Introduction When I lived in Mexico City at the end of the 1940's, it was a city of one million people, with clear. Bill paid for my books and tuition, and a per-month living allowance. The City appealed to me.

William S. Burroughs was born to a wealthy family on February 5, 1914 in St Louis His numerous books include Naked Lunch, Junky, Queer, Nova Express, Interzone, The Wild Boys, The Ticket That Exploded and The Soft Machine. Burroughs was born to a wealthy family on February 5, 1914 in St Louis. After leaving home in 1932 to attend Harvard University, Burroughs became involved in the contemporary counterculture. In work and in life Burroughs expressed a lifelong subversion of the morality, politics and economics of modern America. His numerous books include Naked Lunch, Junky, Queer, Nova Express, Interzone, The Wild Boys, The Ticket That Exploded and The Soft Machine. After living in Mexico City, Tangier, Paris, and London, Burroughs finally returned to America in 1974.

Книга Queer, автор Burroughs William - (Книга жанра . by William S. Introduction The . Bill paid for my books and tuition, and a per-month living allowance

Книга Queer, автор Burroughs William - (Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. When I lived in Mexico City at the end of the 1940's, it was a city of one million people, with clear sparkling air and the sky that special shade of blue that goes so well with circling vultures, blood and sand-the raw menacing pitiless Mexican blue. I liked Mexico City from the first day of my first visit there. William S. The book is structured as a series of loosely connected vignettes. The Soft Machine introduced us to the conditions of a universe where endemic lusts of the mind and body pray upon men, hook them, and turn them into beasts. Nova Express takes William S. Burroughs’s nightmarish futuristic tale one step further. The reader follows the narration of junkie William Lee, who takes on various aliases, from the . to Mexico, eventually to Tangier and the dreamlike Interzone.

I have a passionate hatred for William Burroughs. I think even his fans have to concede that he's a degenerate piece of shit

One of Burrough's most searing and astonishing writings. I have a passionate hatred for William Burroughs. I think even his fans have to concede that he's a degenerate piece of shit.

by William S. Bill paid for my books and tuition, and a per-month living allowance

by William S. Burroughs, Lawrence, Kansas.

Originally written in 1952 but not published till 1985, "Queer" is an enigma - both an unflinching autobiographical self-portrait and a coruscatingly political novel, Burroughs' only realist love story and a montage of comic-grotesque fantasies that paved the way for his masterpiece, "Naked Lunch". Set in Mexico City during the early fifties, "Queer" follows William Lee's hopeless pursuit of desire from bar to bar in the American expatriate scene. As Lee breaks down, the trademark Burroughsian voice emerges; a maniacal mix of self-lacerating humor and the Ugly American at his ugliest. A haunting tale of possession and exorcism, "Queer" is also a novel with a history of secrets, as this new edition reveals.
Comments (7)
Gabar
It took a short time for the book to finally click with me, but once it did, like all books by William Burroughs, it became impossible to put down.

"It was a wise old queen--Bobo, we called her--who taught me that I had a duty to live and bear my burden proudly for all to see, to conquer prejudice and ignorance and hate with knowledge and sincerity and love.”

A common theme in the book is the search for non-verbal communication, sometimes by a man seeking quick love in the Mexican nite; or the same man all too hurt by a deeper relationship, hoping he can express himself clairvoyantly, via intuition; or by means of suspicious glances between two friends evaluating the company of a lonesome and maudlin soul; there is even the discourse of hallucinatory drugs and their 'telepathic' powers. If you consider the time period when Burroughs wrote this and the general opinion at that time towards queer sexuality, it makes perfect sense why he'd seek out eccentric ways to discuss forbidden feelings and attractions.
LeXXXuS
"Queer" is the sequel to William Burroughs' seminal work "Junky," which set a sort of standard for novels based around quasi-autobiographical addiction and post-drug use malaise. However "Queer" isn't about Burroughs' avatar Lee's continuing addiction to heroin, but rather some of the weird experiences he has down in Mexico and later the depths of South America while spending time with a man he's become obsessed with named Allerton.

To summarize the book, it starts off almost immediately after "Junky," Lee is living in Mexico where he's fled after a drug bust nearly put him in prison in New Orleans and now he's gotten himself off of heroin but has taken up a new dangerous habit in the form of excessive alcohol intake. He spends most of his time in bars, putting down 'routines,' which are diatribe-like shaggy dog stories that don't really go anywhere and he uses them to entertain the company he keeps in the bars and restaurants he spends most of his time in. He eventually meets a young man named Allerton who he quickly becomes obsessed with and tries to do everything in his power to be around him even though Allerton wants little to nothing to do with Lee. After some coercing, he convinces Allerton to go to South America with him to search for a drug called 'Yage,' which Lee believes will make him psychic and allow himself to manipulate the wills of people and maybe even reality itself through some form of telepathy, which the drug purportedly has the abilities to do. Then the story stops dead-- the book ends without any closure and just sort of stops. I'm not sure if this was Burroughs' intention, or the result of the book not being published for many years after it was written and some of the final chapters being lost but the story quickly ends after briefly shifting from third person to first person in the epilogue and ends with no sense of closure or coming full circle the way most of Burroughs' work, even his abstract stuff does.

It's well written, if not slow with well developed characters and it has the same dark mood to it that "Junky" had with some of the twists like deciding to go to South America, but ultimately "Queer" is inferior to "Junky," because the story is constantly interrupted by Bill Lee's goofy little 'routines,' these routines are present in many of Burroughs' work, but they serve no purpose here in "Queer," and don't do anything to move the story along and instead slow down the pace of the book and often make you find yourself looking ahead to see just how long they go on because of their empty additions that seem to serve only the purpose of padding out an otherwise fine story with diatribes against nobody in particular. However, if you can get past them, which I did, the book is fine and serves as a decent footnote to a far superior novel.

If you're new to Burroughs' work, pick this book up and "Junky," and maybe a book of Burroughs' short stories like "Interzone" or "Exterminator!" and read "Junky" first. This, like I said, serves as little more than a footnote to the colossally entertaining "Junky," and is for people who read that and wanted to see more of some of the characters or styles of "Junky." Other than that, "Queer" is decent as a stand alone novel, but stands on very shaky ground.
GAMER
I listened to a story on 'This American Life' about Burroughs and decided to give him a read. His ingluencd is far-reaching and dotted all through American culture and I wanted to know why, so I bought some books. This is an interesting book. It's called queer, so you get what it's about. The narrator has a tendency to babble, but when he keys in on something related to the story, it's interesting and insightful. There aren't lascivious sex scenes, there is tons of drinking. Overall I like it and plan to read more of his books, because I like his 'voice'.
Akinozuru
Get past the title, and realize this is a novel of longing and heartache not as bad as some might think, give WSB a chance.
Fecage
It's Burrough's - What else can you say. One of a kind!!!
Nightscar
This 25th anniversary edition of William Burroughs book Queer arrived in less than 3-days time and is now more like 32years since it was written and that much more a cult classic.
Leceri
Have always been a huge fan of Burroughs' work. This is definitely one of his more coherent novels, with an actual plot you can follow all the way through. It is confusing at times but that's to be expected from the mind of Old Bill Lee. The desperate relationship between Lee and Allerton is a true heart jerker, subtle as it may be, and I highly suggest those looking for a challange to read this.
What's worth the price of admission is the prologue where Burroughs elaborates (if I'm not mistaken) about his adventures to South America.