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by Brian M. Stableford

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Author: Brian M. Stableford
ISBN: 0381982807
Language: English
Pages: 294 pages
Publisher: John Day Co.; 1st edition (1975)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: mbr lit rtf mobi
FB2 size: 1987 kb | EPUB size: 1803 kb | DJVU size: 1173 kb

Brian M. Stableford AN BOOK New York, NY. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, scanning or any information storage retrieval system, without explicit permission in writing from the Author. This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places and incidents are products of the authorтАЩs imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locals or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

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Brian Michael Stableford (born 25 July 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 70 novels. His earlier books were published under the name Brian M. Stableford, but more recent ones have dropped the middle initial and appeared under the name Brian Stableford. He has also used the pseudonym Brian Craig for a couple of very early works, and again for a few more recent works

In Harker Lee, the man whom society is caging for his crimes, now lies the hope that man might break out of the greatest of all cages: the void of empty darkness which enfolds the Earth. In this chilling, enthralling novel of psychology and science fiction, one final escape must be made, for a man and for mankind. Sci-fi & Fantasy Psychological Fiction.

In Harker Lee, the man whom society is caging for his crimes, now lies the hope that man might break out of the greatest of all cages: the void of. .

In Harker Lee, the man whom society is caging for his crimes, now lies the hope that man might break out of the greatest of all cages: the void of empty darkness which enfolds the Earth.

His earlier books were published under the name Brian M. Stableford, but more recent ones have dropped the middle initial and appeared under the name Brian Stableford

Harker Lee is a survivor  . He has also used the pseudonym Brian Craig for a couple of very early works, and again for a few more recent works. The pseudonym Brian Michael Stableford is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 70 novels.

by. Stableford, Brian M. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 24, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

In Harker Lee, the man whom society is caging for his crimes, now lies the hope that man . More by Brian M. Stableford.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Stableford, Brian - Man in a Cage. Stableford Brian M. 493 Kb. 605 Kb. Stableford, Brian - O For a Fiery Gloom and Thee. 24 Kb.

Comments (4)
Zetadda
Too cerebral for me. I do not have a phycology degree and I think you need it for this book. As I did not finish the book I cannot give a detailed synopsis. Good luck to those brave enough to give it a try
Burking
There is the classic scene in Enter the Dragon where Bruce Lee enters a room of mirrors. His scratched and bleeding body caught in a prism of reflections, he loses himself for a moment, his brain in panic in the existentially ambiguous, claustrophobic space. Make the man a schizophrenic, lock the door, send the room hurtling through space and you’ve got Brian Stableford’s intelligently complex, psychologically alinear, and finely crafted Man in a Cage (1975). Deservingly re-released by Open Road Media this year, it’s a character study incorporating and transcending the individual to comment on humanity. Smoothly shifting gears between perspectives, delicately poetic yet unforgiving in tone when the situation requires, the novel is an overlooked masterpiece of science fiction that, like Bruce Lee, is forced to look at itself from multiple perspectives to find some semblance of truth.

Locked up in a dangerous maximum security prison for more than ten years is the schizophrenic homicidal maniac, Harker Lee. Even the guards suffering mental lapses due to the harshness of the conditions, Lee steels himself to the exigiencies of life, letters and journal entries to himselves the main stress relievers. Gangpressed into civic duty one day, however, the space program has had repeated failures sending sane men into hyperspace and believe that “Space drives men mad. Hence send a madman. What harm can it do him?” Wary of ulterior motives yet desiring freedom, and all the while warring with the carousel of voices in his head, Lee’s excursion with Project Titan will make him or break him, humanity’s fate tied to his own.

Freedom and captivity far from objective, the person in prison can say autonomy exists within the bounds of their cell walls while the person on the street may regret being earthbound, unable to fly like a bird. Man in a Cage thankfully explores this subjectivity in terms far more subtle and insightful than that sentence. Working acts of legerdemain with confinement, freedom, psychosis, and sanity, Stableford digs at their meanings, not in individual terms, rather in relationship to one another, and all from an interior view to the human psyche. Masterfully braiding three narrative strands, the reader gets a look into the realities (strong plural) of Lee’s existence, an engaging, thought-provoking story the result.

As such, Man in a Cage does not deserve the fate time and reader awareness have allotted it. And it’s tough to say why. Certainly it is literary genre—the side of science fiction which naturally gets less attention than more flashy, accessible mainstream efforts. But there have been sophisticated novels recognized by the field in the past, and there’s no reason why Man in a Cage cannot achieve this. The use of language is rich yet smooth, the narrative is structured perfectly, theme is effectively presented in terms of first, second, and third person perspectives to achieve the desired “person/mirror room/truth beyond” effect, and the plot gently escalates to a phenomenally realized conclusion that burns like a dynamite fuse in terms of narrative revision, expression of philosophical concerns, and relevancy to life here on Earth. This is a major work of sf, no false reflections.

In the end, Man in a Cage is an intelligent, multi-faceted (literally and figuratively) examination of the human psyche through the barriers imposed on it by material space and its workings within the limits it knowingly and unknowingly imposes on itself. Fascinating for Stableford’s ability to slip in and out of perspectives, a sublime experience for the easy color and flow of language, and insightful into the condition of being human, it is highly recommended for the reader of speculative fiction who enjoys a tussle getting at the sub-text of a novel and a slingshot ending that propels the mind to greater heights of thought. A densely poetic, philosophical work, it deserves significantly stronger attention from the genre community.
Xmatarryto
Well, I thought I was going to read another of the authors works on faster than light space travel; and it was, but from a wholly different perspective. The schizophrenic narrator, selected to pilot the ship, as all previous “sane” pilots did not return, returned dead or damaged, rendering faster than light travel impossible for mankind. Meanwhile the reader is treated to a powerfully written psychological, philosophical treatise on individual's social adaptations. Frankly, I struggled with the book as it can not be considered a space opera or romance even though its subject matter is pure science fiction. Interesting book, but be warned.
Kelenn
I struggled with this book and had a hard time finishing it. This is a book that is only going to be worth a select group of people, apparently I am not part of that group.

I was given this book in exchange for an honest review via Netgalley.