» » THE PHILOSOPHER'S APPRENTICE

Download THE PHILOSOPHER'S APPRENTICE fb2

by James Morrow

Download THE PHILOSOPHER'S APPRENTICE fb2
Author: James Morrow
ISBN: 0297853449
Language: English
Pages: 352 pages
Publisher: WEIDENFELD & NICOLSON; Export Ed edition (March 13, 2008)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: azw mbr mobi docx
FB2 size: 1961 kb | EPUB size: 1454 kb | DJVU size: 1899 kb

The philosopher’s apprentice. Printed in the United States of America

The philosopher’s apprentice. Printed in the United States of America. For information address HarperCollins Publishers, 10 East 53rd Street, New York, NY 10022. HarperCollins books may be purchased for educational, business, or sales promotional use.

The Philosopher's Apprentice continues the grand Morrow tradition, slaughtering the sacred cows of cloning . Having never read any James Morrow, I wasn't sure what to expect

The Philosopher's Apprentice continues the grand Morrow tradition, slaughtering the sacred cows of cloning, abortion, the value of philosophy, and even the place of ethics (if any?!?) in our overclocked, corporatized world. Additionally, it's one of Morrow's best character studies. Moral dilemmas and emotional lives are rendered poignantly and with utter clarity through the first-person narrator. Having never read any James Morrow, I wasn't sure what to expect. But having recently started reading philosophy texts again, I thought this book could be fun and also thought-provoking.

James Morrow bound copy of my dissertation. I pulled on my Kierkegaard T-shirt, hurried out the door, and, by the grace of Isis, Thoth, and public transportation, caught my 8:20 . flight, wafting from staid and predictable Boston to the exotic metropolis of Miami.

A philosopher is given the task of teaching a mysterious child, but does not foresee the consequences for his protegee . Mason is to use his knowledge as a philosopher to instil a conscience, a moral compass in the child

A philosopher is given the task of teaching a mysterious child, but does not foresee the consequences for his protegee. After crashing and burning during his PhD viva, Mason Ambrose is offered a large amount of money to go to a mysterious tropical island - Isla de Sangre. Mason is to use his knowledge as a philosopher to instil a conscience, a moral compass in the child. Mason happily instructs her in schools of thought, from the stoics to the epicureans, but it is when he introduces Londa to the Beatitudes that the seeds of a rampaging sense of justice are sown. Venturing from the confines of the island, Londa sets out to create a world that is more just.

Morrow is awfully keen on "thought experiments" and The Philosopher's Apprentice is a giant and unsustainable one. Topics.

Holed up on a secluded island, under Ambrose's tutelage, Londa becomes passionately committed to correcting global injustice. Morrow is awfully keen on "thought experiments" and The Philosopher's Apprentice is a giant and unsustainable one.

The Philosopher's Apprentice. A brilliant philosopher with a talent for self-destruction, Mason Ambrose has torpedoed a promising academic career and now faces a dead-end future. Before joining the ranks of the unemployed, however, he's approached by a representative of billionaire geneticist Dr. Edwina Sabacthani, who makes him an offer no starving ethicist could refuse

The Philosopher's Apprentice book.

The Philosopher's Apprentice book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Philosopher's Apprentice. By (author) James Morrow. Free delivery worldwide. A brilliant philosopher with a talent for self-destruction, Mason Ambrose gratefully accepts an offer no starving ethicist could refuse. He must travel to a private tropical island and tutor Londa Sabacthani, a beautiful, brilliant adolescent who has lost both her memory and her moral sense in a freak accident.

The book was ultimately published as The Philosopher’s Apprentice (William Morrow, 2008). Throughout the first decade of the twenty-first century, James and Kathryn Morrow were regular guests at Utopiales, a literary festival held annually in Nantes. Much as The Last Witchfinder celebrates the coming of the Enlightenment, Morrow’s tenth novel, Galápagos Regained (St. Martin’s Press, 2015), rejoices in the advent of evolutionary thought.

Comments (7)
Brazil
James Morrow continues to poke Western society in its most sensitive spots, never resorting to the cudgel, and always making us laugh, chortle, or smirk even as we wince. The Philosopher's Apprentice continues the grand Morrow tradition, slaughtering the sacred cows of cloning, abortion, the value of philosophy, and even the place of ethics (if any?!?) in our overclocked, corporatized world. Additionally, it's one of Morrow's best character studies. Moral dilemmas and emotional lives are rendered poignantly and with utter clarity through the first-person narrator.

My one real complaint is apparently a trick of the publisher, although I am literally guilty of judging a book by its cover. I happened across the book and ordered it immediately based on its author, not bothering to read the synopsis. Because the cover style is so similar to the style used for The Last Witchfinder, I was expecting another novel set in that milieu. As far as the cover goes, the joke's on me, but the larger joke is on people who pass up this splendid novel.
Zymbl
Having never read any James Morrow, I wasn't sure what to expect. But having recently started reading philosophy texts again, I thought this book could be fun and also thought-provoking. It definitely was. The Philosopher's Apprentice is like Christopher Moore meets Herman Hesse. It definitely would help to have some knowledge of philosophy to get the most from this story, but it certainly is not required. Just observing the state of the world will be a good background to enjoy this book. If deep, ethical questions and paradoxes appeal to you, this book will too.

Mason Ambrose, materialist and philosophy student is at a crossroads. His future in philosophy is in jeopardy when he is offered a lucrative job. His task will be to tutor teenager Londa, and provide her with a conscience, for due to an accident, she has amnesia and doesn't know how to act ethically. Mason's acceptance of this role takes him and others on an "odyssey" that the reader doesn't know how or where it will end until the story's conclusion.

The Philosopher's Apprentice contains great philosophical/ethical and political issues and would really appeal to someone who has interest in cloning and genetics(hint, hint.) I don't want to say more and give away any of the twists and turns of this story. I really enjoyed this novel. Good stuff.
Conjuril
in the course of Morrow's novel of a philosophy student who ends up taking on the task of providing a moral compass to a morally absent teenager, takes us through a roller coaster ride of emotions, morality, death, adventure, surrealism, brillance & finally lunacy.
The novel itself is well written, & at first makes plausabile the unplausible, but in the last 3rd takes a nose dive into a colidiascope of confusion & ambiguouity. At times difficult to read & others utterly poignant. Morrow's novel touches upon the ultimate failure of morals when tested & confronted in real life scenerios, along with a changing of the moral guard when emotions play a role in ethically confusing situations.
Walianirv
Seamus and Emer Okay if Kurt Vonnegut got together with Raymond Chandler and Philip K. Dick and were locked in a room for a week they would come out with this crazy but wildly entertaining and hugely enjoyable mad hatter intellectual joy ride of a book. it rocks dude. buy it right now!!! You'll have mind-blowing fun reading it and there is not a boring sentence in it. What can i say? I'm a rabid fan now. Good work. Really good work.
Yadon
Morrow has written a book of staggering brilliance and imagination. Your brain and your soul will thank you for devouring this tome.
MilsoN
Very interesting read. If there had been embedded links to references, I'd have never made it through. I recommend it.
Moonworm
Once again Morrow tackles many scared cows but does it in a way that does not seem heavy handed or preachy. The plot is wonderfully unique, fast paced, and does not disappoint. Put it on your must read list.
James Morrow is my favorite author. I was introduced to his brilliant verbosity through a University Prof of mine who had us read "This is the Way the World Ends" (a FANTASTIC, hilarious and haunting work) for our class on SF. I soon after read the Godhead Trilogy and a collection of Short Stories and I was hooked. "The Continent of Lies" is perhaps of his my favorite.

Onto the matter at hand. After the meandering, unfulfilling "Witchfinder" where ideas were too simple and plot twists too unnecessary, I was very eager to get my hands on a "The Philosopher's Apprentice". The title alone had me. I cracked it open and the brilliant Morrow of Old had returned and with a vengence! Beautiful sentences and consistently original metaphors continually sprung from the page, some of which made me laugh uproariously and all of which made me remember what a fine craftsman Morrow is with language.

And then. And then the second section of the book began and what was a finely crafted narrative suddenly came grinding to a halt. The plot was nearly non-existent. What was an interesting diegesis with characters I was empathetic towards almost immediately lost my interest. I had no inclination to continue reading. Though, of course, I did.

The final section of the book returns with a plot worthy of the ideas it is designed to convey. The characters, however, don't seem to do much changing and, as another reviewer mentioned, they tend to make decisions that don't align with who I think they are.

And though the final section is good, it is not enough to redeem the plodding, dull and poorly conceived middle section. To be honest, I was glad when the book was done. And though I may read it again in times far away, I am not really looking forward to doing so.

Do I recommend it to Morrow fans? Absolutely, for there are some real jems in here. Do I recommend it to the general public? Nope, for it gives the reader a view of Morrow which is not accurate to his genius.