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by Douglas Coupland

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Author: Douglas Coupland
ISBN: 0007182589
Language: English
Publisher: HarperPerennial (2004)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: txt lrf mobi mbr
FB2 size: 1345 kb | EPUB size: 1751 kb | DJVU size: 1690 kb

Also by Douglas Coupland. I tried slamming it with my hip, but that didn’t work; it only made the books spray all over the pavement.

Also by Douglas Coupland. But I didn’t get upset. Inside the school, classes were already in session and the hallways were as silent as the inside of my house, and I thought to myself, What a day for silence.

Hey Nostradamus! is a novel by Douglas Coupland centred on a fictional 1988 school shooting in suburban Vancouver, British Columbia and its aftermath. This is Coupland's most critically acclaimed novel. It was first published by Random House of Canada in 2003. The novel comprises four first-person narratives, each from the perspective of a character directly or indirectly affected by the shooting. The novel intertwines substantial themes, including adolescent love, sex, religion, prayer and grief.

Читать онлайн - Coupland Douglas. Hey Nostradamus! Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн Hey Nostradamus!. Hey Nostradamus! By Douglas Coupland Behold, I tell you a mystery; we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet; for the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed

Hey Nostradamus! is a very odd book. It’s among Coupland’s most serious efforts, yet his intent is not entirely clear.

Hey Nostradamus! Annotation. Author: Douglas Coupland. Hey Nostradamus! is a very odd book. Certainly there is no attempt at psychological insight into the killers’ motives, and the most developed relationships–those between Jason and Cheryl, and Jason and Reg–seem to have little to do with each other.

Hey Nostradamus! book. Douglas Coupland sure knows how to tap into prevailing cultural phenomena and weave them into compelling tales. Aug 04, 2013 Graham Crawford rated it it was ok. Once you've read a couple of Couplands, you quickly realize he essentially writes the same book over and over - or perhaps it's kinder to say his books all circle the same set of concerns (like his image of a B-movie star being sucked into a maelstrom special effect).

Douglas Coupland returns to re-inventing Canada following his best-seller that made it clear, Canada is way more than slightly cool. Douglas Coupland gets Canada

Dictator Style: Lifestyles of the World's Most Colorful Despots. by Peter York · Douglas Coupland. Douglas Coupland returns to re-inventing Canada following his best-seller that made it clear, Canada is way more than slightly cool. Douglas Coupland gets Canada. Better, he has set out to re-invent his country with his particular brand of insight, humor, Souvenir of Canada.

Douglas Coupland, the prophet of Generation X, has reached a new philosophical awareness in Hey Nostradamus!, says Alfred . Coupland's most recent novels have been vehicles for his increasingly morbid obsessions. Miss Wyoming expounded his fascination with air disasters.

Douglas Coupland, the prophet of Generation X, has reached a new philosophical awareness in Hey Nostradamus!, says Alfred Hickling. All Families Are Psychotic contained a bizarre plot featuring a farewell letter placed by Prince William in his mother's coffin. Hey Nostradamus! was inspired by a news report about the massacre at Columbine High School, Colorado, in April 1999, when two teenage gunmen slaughtered a teacher and 14 of their fellow students.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1988, a catastrophic episode of teen violence shatters a suburban community. HEY NOSTRADAMUS follows the aftermath in various voices across two decades: the teenage victims whose ordinary preoccupations with sex and spirituality will never evolve past that moment; the parents whose exposure to their children's underground world threatens their deepest convictions; and those who come to know the survivors only later in life.

Coupland's most surprising and soulful novel yet, rich with his trademark cultural acuity and dark humour, Hey Nostradamus! ties themes of alienation, violence and misguided faith into a fateful and unforgettable knot from which four people must untangle their lives. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

In 1988, a catastrophic episode of teen violence shatters a suburban community. HEY NOSTRADAMUS follows the aftermath in various voices across two decades: the teenage victims whose ordinary preoccupations with sex and spirituality will never evolve past that moment; the parents whose exposure to their children's underground world threatens their deepest convictions; and those who come to know the survivors only later in life, unable to fully realize what really transpired. HEY NOSTRADAMUS wrestles with religion and nihilism, sorrow and acceptance. It will take you to a place you didn't know existed.
Comments (7)
Xangeo
I read this for a book club. The reviews here and the jacket blurb intrigued me. The jacket blurb was the best writing I found between these covers.

The characters are two-dimensional and interchangable. Their prose and dialogue is the same no matter who's speaking. No one was developed well enough for me to care what happened to them and each narrator was more sanctimonius and vapid than the last.

The dialogue is incredibly bad. No one talks like this, especially not the teenagers in part one (narrated by Cheryl).

Each character preached at me and, given their choices in their cardboard lives, I didn't appreciate it. I expected it from Reg but from Jason? And from Cheryl? I read her section eagerly, looking forward to watching her die, terrible as that sounds.

What would have helped this story was focus on... anything, really. There are scenes and plotlines that begin and go nowhere. The key to this book could have been the fathers/sons: Reg, Jason, Kent, the twins and Cheryl's unborn child. In his section, Reg says that Jason can never know his pain, having never been a father. That's all the attention the subject is given and all we can do is bristle and read the few remaining pages. Meanwhile readers know this isn't the case. But we don't get a great enough sense of this being the key to Jason's life, we don't care and subsequently what could have been an interesting aspect of the story from a literary standpoint is wasted.

On the good side, it's a quick read b/c there's little to think about and nothing to challenge the reader.

There's a reason this book is out of print.
Virn
This is a story about high school massacre in Vancouver in 1988 and how that massacre affected various characters in the novel, at least on the surface. More than this story being about a cause and effect play by play of an unfortunate event, it is about how people deal with situations with faith and the difference between religion and spirituality. Before I get ahead of myself here I would like to say that this book is not at all preachy, nor is it accusatory or abrasive. It is not so much a book about religion as it is a book about how people act when being 'religious' or not, and what that actually means. Each of the main characters in turn display a fervent belief and then a denial or realization that what they once believed may not be what they supposed it to be. Some people may not want to read this book because it has religion in it, and to those under that category I say that you will not be offended and will enjoy the book. To those who may read the book because it is about religion I want to say that it is more about individual interpretation and potentially exploitation for personal gain than it is a celebration of any faith, and you may be offended at some parts, but not deeply.

The novel told through the eyes of four people, and each person was strongly impacted by the narrator before him or her. The story begins with two high school sweethearts, Cheryl and Jason, who love each other immensely and get secretly married (both because they love each other and because they want to have sex without committing a sin). Cheryl, the first narrator, became religious because she liked Jason and he was very religious (because of family reasons), but she soon come to strongly associate with the faith personally and throughout her segment of the story she speaks only to god, and we the audience over hear her prayers. Then one day a couple of youths from their high school hijack the school cafeteria with a couple of guns and kill some people, one of those people being Cheryl. Jason comes in to save her at the last minute and kills one of the terrorists, but is too late to save Cheryl.

Jason is the next narrator and we come into his life several years after the tragedy. Though Jason was seemingly religious in high school, he was so because of his father's fervent, almost nervous devotion to religion. His father was a very judgmental man and Jason could never seem to do anything quite good enough to satisfy him. After the massacre it was rumoured that Jason had planned the entire thing, and of course a majority of the town believed it. Even after he was proved innocent by the law and was named a hero by some of the papers his father could only see the fact that he'd killed a boy, no matter how many lives he might have saved in the process. Jason's account is very bitter in some places. The world had not been kind to him and he could not move on. Unlike the other narrators, Jason's account doesn't largely deal with his own personal relationship with religion. He talks more about how others relationships with religion have affected him, and how even though he isn't religious himself, he still falls back on some of the institutional rituals followed by people who believe.

The next narrator is named Heather, a woman who enters a sort of awkward relationship with and eventually marries Jason. Jason disappears shortly after her segment begins, and Heather deals with a psychic named Allison who seems to be in contact with Jason on some sort of spiritual level. This segment was interesting for me because it made me reflect on how people in contemporary, secular society seem to find pathways to express some sort of religious behaviour. Obviously believing in a psychic being able to contact individuals is a reflection of faith on some level. But more than the whole psychic thing, what was interesting to observe was Heather's behaviour and relationship with her desire to contact this person. Her need at these times were, while completely devoid of religion, were still strongly tied to faith. And what's more is I could associate her behaviour to what I've seen people feel while in a romantic relationship, or while at work, or studying, etc. That almost feverish desire is present in many aspects of life, not just religion, and that calls into question where one can draw the line between faith and religion. Or where one can start to separate faith and spirituality. Religion has a very defined identity in pop culture, and if you're not a card carrying member, the idea of it can be very unattractive. But how many of our day to day hopes and dreams and actions could be classified by an outsider as being likened to what we classify religious action? Just something to think about.

The last narrator is Jason's father, Reg. We hear many tales of this man throughout the novel, most of them unflattering. So by the time we get to hear him speak there is already a sort of prejudice against the man. Reg's account is more of a reflection than it is a narration or a tale recounted. He speaks of his faith, but in a refreshing way that I will not go into detail about.

I listened to this book aurally and I really enjoyed the voice actors. I thought the people chosen were well suited to their roles and were a pleasure to listen to. Overall this was a good book and I would recommend it.
Nidora
Awesome book! My 17 year old son and I are reading it. He thinks it's fantastic.
Bad Sunny
Starting with a high school shooting in 1988, this story is told in four parts from four people affected by it, directly or indirectly, and how it changed the course of their lives forever.

An interesting look into the lives of ordinary people who survive extraordinary things and then have to go about surviving the mythos built up around the event by those who weren't there.

This was the kind of book that when I finished it had me wishing someone else had read it so I could discuss it with them. There was just so much there.