» » Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel

Download Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel fb2

by James Lee Burke

Download Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel fb2
Author: James Lee Burke
ISBN: 1476710767
Language: English
Pages: 560 pages
Category: Mystery
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (July 23, 2013)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: lrf doc mbr lit
FB2 size: 1975 kb | EPUB size: 1832 kb | DJVU size: 1275 kb

Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel. James Lee Burke is a highly regarded author who paints vivid pictures with his words, allowing you to sit back and immerse yourself in the Deep South as he transitions from scene to scene

Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel. Mass Market Paperback. The New Iberia Blues: A Dave Robicheaux Novel. Heaven's Prisoners (Dave Robicheaux Mysteries (Paperback)). James Lee Burke is a highly regarded author who paints vivid pictures with his words, allowing you to sit back and immerse yourself in the Deep South as he transitions from scene to scene. There are several reasons for his success: He is passionate about his subject matter, his characters, and the environment.

I WAS NEVER GOOD at solving mysteries. I don’t mean the kind cops solve or the ones you read about in novels or watch on television or on a movie screen. I’m not talking about the mystery of Creation, either, or the unseen presences that reside perhaps just the other side of the physical world.

Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel. New York Times bestselling author and America’s best novelist (The Denver Post) James Lee Burke is back with the twentieth mystery in the masterful Dave Robicheaux series.

Police detective Dave Robicheaux faces off with the most diabolical villain he has ever faced in the twentieth .

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads.

Light Of the World book. James Lee Burke introduces his most evil character yet in the twentieth thriller in the bestselling Dave Robicheaux series

Light Of the World book. James Lee Burke introduces his most evil character yet in the twentieth thriller in the bestselling Dave Robicheaux series. A New York Times bestselling author many times over, James Lee Burke is a two-time Edgar Award-winner whose every book is cause for excitement, especially those in the wildly popular Dave Robicheaux series.

James Lee Burke (born December 5, 1936) is an American author, best known for his Dave Robicheaux series

James Lee Burke (born December 5, 1936) is an American author, best known for his Dave Robicheaux series. He has won Edgar Awards for Black Cherry Blues (1990) and Cimarron Rose (1998), and has also been presented with the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America. The Robicheaux character has been portrayed twice on screen, first by Alec Baldwin (Heaven's Prisoners) and then Tommy Lee Jones (In the Electric Mist).

James Lee Burke has pitted his likable good people against one of the most evil perpetrators to appear in fiction, maybe for Dave Robicheaux since Legion Guidry, the kind you would find in novels of Cormac McCarthy and Thomas Harris

James Lee Burke has pitted his likable good people against one of the most evil perpetrators to appear in fiction, maybe for Dave Robicheaux since Legion Guidry, the kind you would find in novels of Cormac McCarthy and Thomas Harris. The story hooks you and has the right pace and momentum, be prepared to be immersed and at the edge of your seat and then find yourself back and seated evenly on your seat for a time in repose and reflection on great writing and then back at the edge of your seat again. A must read for 2013 to hit Best of 2013 lists around the globe.

A Dave Robicheaux Novel. Part of Dave Robicheaux. Trade Paperback Mass Market Paperback Unabridged Audio Download Abridged Audio Download Abridged Compact Disk Unabridged Compact Disk.

BY THE SAME AUTHOR DAVE ROBICHEAUX NOVELS Swan Peak The Tin Roof Blowdown Pegasus . This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and. incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are.

BY THE SAME AUTHOR DAVE ROBICHEAUX NOVELS Swan Peak The Tin Roof Blowdown Pegasus Descending Crusader’s Cross Last Car to Elysian Fields Jolie Blon’s Bounce Purple.

A fisherman running a trotline by the levee, way down in the bottom of Vermilion Parish, almost to the salt water, had seen a lidless oil drum half submerged on its side in the cattails.

A fisherman running a trotline by the levee, way down in the bottom of Vermilion Parish, almost to the salt water, had seen a lidless oil drum half submerged on its side in the cattails e paid little attention to it, except for the fact that he saw the backs of alligator gars arching out of the water in the moonlight as they tore at something inside the barrel. I drove down the narrow dirt track on top of the levee through the miles of flooded sawgrass that eventually bled into the Gulf.

“America’s best novelist” (The Denver Post) and “the reigning champ of nostalgia noir” (The New York Times Book Review) introduces his most evil character yet in the twentieth thriller in the bestselling Dave Robicheaux series.Louisiana Sherriff’s Detective Dave Robicheaux and his longtime friend and partner Clete Purcel are vacationing in Montana’s spectacular Big Sky country when a series of suspicious events leads them to believe their lives—and the lives of their families—are in danger. In contrast to the tranquil beauty of Flathead Lake and the colorful summertime larch and fir unspooling across unblemished ranchland, a venomous presence lurks in the caves and hills, intent on destroying innocent lives. First, Alafair Robicheaux is nearly killed by an arrow while hiking alone on a trail. Then Clete’s daughter, Gretchen Horowitz, whom readers met in Burke’s previous bestseller Creole Belle, runs afoul of a local cop, with dire consequences. Next, Alafair thinks she sees a familiar face following her around town—but how could convicted sadist and serial killer Asa Surette be loose on the streets of Montana? Surrette committed a string of heinous murders while capital punishment was outlawed in his home state of Kansas. Years ago, Alafair, a lawyer and novelist, interviewed Surette in prison, aiming to prove him guilty of other crimes and eligible for the death penalty. Recently, a prison transport van carrying Surette crashed and he is believed dead, but Alafair isn’t so sure. Says The Plain Dealer (Cleveland), “Already designated a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America, Burke should get another title, say, for sustained literary brilliance in his Dave Robicheaux series.” Light of the World is a harrowing novel that examines the nature of evil and pits Dave Robicheaux against the most diabolical villain he has ever faced.
Comments (7)
Shan
James Lee Burke is a national treasure. His writing is a fearsome amalgam of simple story telling that features deeply human characters of an awesome array, from the good-but-flawed to the darkly perverse and evil. Light of the World features Dave Robicheaux, his wife, Molly, his daughter, Alafair, and his life-long friend, Clete Purcel. The setting is the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana. It is a tale familiar to Burke's fans, with roots in the past entangling the characters in a modern saga of revenge and heroism.
JLB is not for the weak of stomach or heart. Violence is a near constant companion throughout the story, leaving the reader as exhausted as the protagonists when reaching the epilogue.
I read JOB's novels a bit more out of love of his creative power and his skills with words and imagery, than for love of his stories. Few writing today can draw you viscerally and sensually into a story as Mr. Burke can.
No matter how dark his stories become, somehow he always manages to let the Light of the World radiate through.
Kazigrel
All of the Robicheaux books are amongst the best in the genre and this is no exception. This one takes place in Montana where Dave and Clete are taking things easy until, of course, the real world intrudes in the form of an old nemesis out to seek revenge on Dave's daughter Alifair, now an adult writer who did a hit piece on the miscreant. In something of a departure in this long-running series, Clete, Alifair and Clete's recently discovered daughter Gretchen play significant roles in the story but not to worry; nothing is lost. Mr. Burke is one of those rare writers whose characters are intelligent, thinking, caring people who frequently digress into ruminations about life, love and especially the impact of the rich and privileged to the detriment of regular working folks. They also aren't fond of cops who go through the motions. To anyone new to the series I'd highly recommend reading them in order, knowing that it will take awhile to get to this one. The good news is that you will have many a night when you won't need to worry about what to do after dinner.
Nikojas
I was so looking forward to reading this book! I had always loved Burke's writing and story lines. However, I was dreading turning the pages because of the depravity of some of the characters. Maybe that makes it a great book. The bad guy is really bad, intolerable, and the good guys are so flawed it is painful. Alafair has interviewed a serial killer, she went into the project trying to be unbiased, but the evil he oozed changed her mind and she ended up writing a series of articles that exposed him as the monster he was. Gretchen Horowitz is back, she is Clete Purcell's daughter and has a background that no one lets her forget, but she is fearless and has the backs of everyone she loves. The dialogues with Dave Robicheaux are convoluted. They start out civilized, but for some reason they quickly deteriorate into arenas that are tense and threatening. No matter who he talks to, there is animus. Dave is a recovering alcoholic, maybe the author is, also, therefore he understands and articulates the inner workings of Dave's mind and motives.
Bliss
When I was in college my first term Lit professor was a pompous ass that was an "expert" in Southern Lit. I forgot his name, but his inability to hear other interpretations of work remains. I'd like to go a round with him in discussing James Lee Burke's books; I'm sure he would dsmiss Burke's books as just mysteries; but I think his work is much more.

Mr. Burke is one of my favorite authors. I think his story lines are superb, and his command of The English language is unequaled. He has the ability to mix mystery, remembrance of the past and its effect on the present that always draws me in. His characters ae flawed, but flawed in a way that we can all relate to. His characters are haunted by the ghosts of the place where they livve and the memories of their past - it is combination of joy, regret, helplessness that spur his characters to do "the right thing."

Paraphasing Freud, sometimes a book is just a book. But I look at Burke as a successor to the great writers of Southern Lit. His books are not just books but writings that make us think about days past, injustices that we regret not doing anything about, and perhaps spurs us to have courage to go on even with the flaws we mortals have.

I seldom can put his books down, they captivate me.

So thank you James Lee Burke - in a world that is seemingly governed now by artificial reality shows - I escaped for a bit - the brain cells worked a little harder and I was captivated by your imagination.

Roy Wood
Nightscar
I am a big fan of JLB. I think Tin Roof Blowdown is one of the finest novels I've read and have recommended it to friends who are dedicated non readers of detective/fiction books. And I have always liked Burke's characterizations of of Dave.

But from page 1 of this book every single person in the book comes out swinging. They are all spoiling for a fight...Alafair starts out by accusing the cowboy of trying to kill her...not asking, accusing. We move to Dave to Clete to the sheriff, to Bertha. Everyone starts off from some sort of antagonistic standpoint. Everyone is angry, everyone is on the lookout for barbs, for ineptitude, for evil. And no one is has to be disappointed. Pointy elbows are met with other pointy elbows; insult with insult; anger with anger. Dialogue is replete with unnecessary profanity (albeit Dave's constant "don't talk like that") and sexual descriptions.

Yes, James, I do buy into the fact that there is evil in the world. But there comes a point where being bashed over the head again and again by adversarial dialogue, by unspeakable evil descriptions (made speak-able here, of course), by characters who are always angry, becomes not meaningful but flat out boring. I don't demand 'heroes' in my books, but after this book I have come to appreciate at least one kind of likable character, a touch of humor, a characterization of someone remotely like the kinds of human beings I have known. Dave used to be that character. Not here.