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by Ian Morson

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Author: Ian Morson
ISBN: 0575600799
Language: English
Pages: 192 pages
Category: Mystery
Publisher: Orion mass market paperback; New Ed edition (June 20, 1996)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: docx azw mobi rtf
FB2 size: 1821 kb | EPUB size: 1732 kb | DJVU size: 1883 kb

A Psalm for Falconer" is the fourth in the "Falconer" Medieval Mystery by Ian Morson, and it is one of the better ones to date

A Psalm for Falconer" is the fourth in the "Falconer" Medieval Mystery by Ian Morson, and it is one of the better ones to date. While crossing the shifting sands of Lancaster Bay with a local guide, he witnesses the recovery of a body from the sandbanks, all of which leads to a 15 year old mystery and the body of a missing monk

Falconer's Crusade book. Start by marking Falconer's Crusade (A Medieval Oxford Mystery) as Want to Read

Falconer's Crusade book. Start by marking Falconer's Crusade (A Medieval Oxford Mystery) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A William Falconer Mystery - Oxford University, 1271. Master William Falconer returns in this chilling and atmospheric medieval murder mystery. He is the author of "Falconer's Crusade. As old buildings are pulled down to make way for a new purpose-built college, a body is revealed. Oxford, January 1273.

Items related to Falconer's Crusade (A Medieval Oxford Mystery). What is the nature of the small book that illiterate Margaret possessed and which she believed would protect her?

Items related to Falconer's Crusade (A Medieval Oxford Mystery). Ian Morson Falconer's Crusade (A Medieval Oxford Mystery). ISBN 13: 9780575600799. MORSON Oxford University, in 1624, the savage murder of a young girl kindles a frenzy of suspicion between privileged students and impoverished townspeople. And when one of Falconer's students who may have witnessed the crime narrowly escapes being beaten to death by a lynch mob, the Regent Master rushes to his defense. What is the nature of the small book that illiterate Margaret possessed and which she believed would protect her?

William Falconer, Regent Master, Falconer debuted in Falconer’s Crusade (1994). Conclusions, The Morson novels featuring William Falconer paint a colourful picture of Oxford in the thirteenth century.

William Falconer, Regent Master, Falconer debuted in Falconer’s Crusade (1994). He is disciple of Roger Bacon, and believes that the earth's surface is curved from scien,fic observa,ons. Margaret Gebetz, Master John Fyssh's French servant, is murdered, and her death is followed by the murders of three students Conclusions, The Morson novels featuring William Falconer paint a colourful picture of Oxford in the thirteenth century. Masters at the university toil teaching lazy and uninterested students, who in turn brawl with townsfolk and patronise pros,tutes at night.

Set in Oxford University in 1264, this murder-mystery follows Regent Master William Falconer, a progressive teacher and amateur detective, as he tries to solve the murder of. .Used availability for Ian Morson's Falconer's Crusade. January 1995 : USA Hardback.

Set in Oxford University in 1264, this murder-mystery follows Regent Master William Falconer, a progressive teacher and amateur detective, as he tries to solve the murder of a local servant girl. His students are under suspicion and Falconer is drawn into a world of heresy, magic and violence. Genre: Historical Mystery.

MORSON Oxford University, in 1624, the savage murder of a young girl kindles a frenzy of suspicion between privileged students and impoverished townspeople.

Oxford University in 1264, seems an oasis of peace in the power struggles that rack England. until the savage murder of a young girl kindles a frenzy of suspicion between privileged students and impoverished townspeople. And when on of Falconer's students who may have witnessed the crime narrowly escapes being beaten to death by a lynch mob, the Regent Master rushes to his defense. Daringly progressive teacher, Aristotelian philosopher, falconer is also a keen amateur detective who must use his sharp eye for human foibles and his relentless logic to solve the heinous crime.

Psalm For Falconer (A medieval Oxford mystery) By Ian Morson.

Comments (7)
Orevise
Falconer's Crusade is a muddy, bloody stroll through medieval Oxford. It is the first in a series that improved as it went along. This introductory adventure has serious plot flaws.

One problem is that the suspects are not internal to the plot, by which I mean, we as readers know that they are the suspects, and that one of them is the murderer, because they are the characters we are told about. There is no reason for Falconer to consider them suspects. He puzzles over which one of them is guilty, but there is no reason why any of them should be, or any reason why anyone else shouldn't be. The guilty party is easy to spot in the end, and if you haven't got it by the end of chapter 13, review what you've read up to then and you shouldn't have much difficulty. The clues are obvious.

Another problem is the coincidental beginning, the main characters happening to be in the same place at the same time. Readers of mysteries don't seem to mind this, of course. If Miss Marple's quiet village or Poirot's vacations become a bloodbath so that they have a good supply of mysteries to solve, we take it in our stride. So perhaps we should not be surprised that Falconer and Thomas are just where they should be, when they should be.

Morson mixes in plenty of historic authenticity, which readers of the medieval mystery genre insist upon. I am not convinced he always gets it right. For example, the nef (elaborate condiment holder) laid before Prince Edward belongs to a later period, I thought. Also, would a Jewish girl of the period really have 'an ivory skin'?

Morson writes well, with an occasional artistic flourish. He is fond of describing 'dust motes dancing in the sunbeams', for example. So the book is a pleasure to read. It just doesn't pass muster as a mystery.
Kriau
Being a fan of historical novels I thought this was an entertaining story.
I read it on my kindle and thought it was a bit short, but neatly tied up.
Oftentimes in mysteries you can kind of predict the way the plot might go,
but Morson puts some nice twists into the plot which made it challenging
and fun to try to figure out who the culprit is. Characters were well-
developed as well. I'm looking forward to reading more of the series.
Djang
Although the subject of this novel is great, and the writing is strong, the poor formatting is disappointing. I couldn't get past the lack of paragraphs. The scene changes were lost because of a lack of clear chapter and paragraph delineation and it was difficult to read. This would probably be a good book if I could get through it. I'd suggest waiting to purchase it until it comes out in a better format. There's really no excuse in this digital age for sloppy books like this.
Samardenob
This is a pretty short mystery to read through. Looks can be deceiving though. Despite being short, it’s packed in with some heavy duty stuff.

The setting for example. Very rich in detail and gives you a sense on how it was back then in William Falconer’s time. Add in some political intrigue, a Jewish Quarter, and some rioting and it gets pretty exciting. I really can’t get over how great the setting is. It’s so descriptive you can feel the darkness and the dampness that permeates throughout the novel. Morson also does an excellent job to stay close to historical accuracy here in this novel as well. Forensic pathology is frowned upon, and you even get to see Falconer try on a strange contraption that looks a lot like Medieval opera glasses at the time. :)

The plot is pretty straight forward although there is not much of a secret mystery element in it. The suspect list is not extensive (thankfully! You’ll see why as you read further into this review) and when revealed it’s not much of a surprise or an a ha! Moment. There isn’t much personality to the characters except Falconer and his student Thomas. Thomas is a particular dolt. A Farmer boy who managed to be gifted and chosen to study and be a Scholar, well, for all the idiotic moves he makes, you have to wonder how the University chose this guy to let him attend their school. He fumbles and stumbles at the worst times and always manages to get himself into some life threatening situations (and doesn’t learn from it). It was funny the first few times, but after a while it gets annoying and you want to slap this boy upside the head. (You don’t deserve Hannah’s attention, you twit).

I’m going to assume it will get better with other books in this series, and this one serves as an introduction to the series. Since I really do love the historical aspect I will stick with this series and see where it takes me. Historical mystery lovers will love the setting and theme of this book, the mystery part, not so much.