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by Linda Clarke

Download Building Capitalism: Historical Change and the Labour Process in the Production of the Built Environment fb2
Author: Linda Clarke
ISBN: 0415015529
Language: English
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Earth Sciences
Publisher: Routledge; 1st edition (February 1, 1992)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: lrf rtf docx doc
FB2 size: 1626 kb | EPUB size: 1824 kb | DJVU size: 1687 kb
Sub: Math

According to Karl Marx, labour process refers to the process whereby labour is materialized or objectified in use values

According to Karl Marx, labour process refers to the process whereby labour is materialized or objectified in use values. Labour is here an interaction between the person who works and the natural world such that elements of the latter are consciously altered in a purposive manner

Changes to the built environment reflect changes in the production process and, in particular, the development of wage labour.

Changes to the built environment reflect changes in the production process and, in particular, the development of wage labour.

Linda Clarke, Westminster University.

Historical change and the labour process in the production of built environment. Linda Clarke, Westminster University. Drawing on examples from the construction sector, divergences in the post-war development of. labour differences - in particular between Britain and (West) Germany - in the nature of wage relations. in the post-war era, in the division of labour and in the vocational education and training (VET). systems will be outlined.

All content in this area was uploaded by Linda Clarke on Oct 20, 2014. change and their origins in the built environment. BISS Proceedings, 1982, p. vii).

It would benefit from engaging with a rich vein of work on the production of the built environment over the last 30 years. Theory inherently develops in the political context in which it exists; if it fails to do so, it may be dangerous. All content in this area was uploaded by Linda Clarke on Oct 20, 2014.

Changes to the built environment reflect changes in the production process and, in particular, the development of wage labour

Changes to the built environment reflect changes in the production process and, in particular, the development of wage labour.

book by Linda Clarke. Linda Clarke's vital work argues that: Urbanization is a product of the social human labour engaged in building as well as a concentration of the labour force. The quality of the labour process determines the development of production.

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Landscape Imagery and Urban Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Britian.

"Building Capitalism" represents an exploration of the nature of urbanization and capitalism. Linda Clarke argues that urbanization is a product of human labour engaged in building as well as a concentration of the labour force; that the quality of the labour process determines the development of production, and that, consequently, changes to the built environment reflect changes in the production process and, in particular, the development of wage labour. In support of these arguments, the author identifies a stage of capitalist building production involving a significant expansion of wage labour, and hence capital, and the transition from artisan to industrial production. The building activity which produced the first metropolis illustrates how the emerging capitalist mode of production finally replaced the remnants of feudal social relations. Linda Clarke draws from a wide range of original material relating to the development of London from the mid-18th to the early 19th century to provide a description of the development process: materials extraction, road-building, house-building, paving, cleansing and more.