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by A. H. Fitter,D. P. Stribley

Download Plant-Microbe Symbiosis: Molecular Approaches fb2
Author: A. H. Fitter,D. P. Stribley
ISBN: 0521587182
Language: English
Pages: 203 pages
Category: Biological Sciences
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (November 13, 1996)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: lrf azw docx txt
FB2 size: 1201 kb | EPUB size: 1560 kb | DJVU size: 1255 kb
Sub: Math

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Please take this quick survey to tell us about what happens after you publish a paper. July 1997, Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 74–74 Cite as. Fitter, . Plant-Microbe Symbiosis: Molecular Approaches. Authors and affiliations.

Plant-Microbe Symbiosis book. Modern molecular approaches make it possible not only Both soil and air teem with microbes, many of which affect plant growth and health through symbiotic relationships ranging from the clearly beneficial, . mycorrhizas and rhizobial infections that supplement plant nutrition, to the clearly harmful, . pathogenic infections that reduce crop yield or destroy forests. Modern molecular approaches make it possible not only to identify all the organisms that comprise complex microbial communities but to understand their interactions with plants.

cle{atsk1997FitterAS, title {Fitter, . Plant-Microbe Symbiosis: Molecular Approaches}, author {Vlasta {vC}atsk{'a}}, journal {Biologia Plantarum}, year {1997}, volume {40}, pages {74} }. Vlasta Čatská. Published in Biologia Plantarum 1997. 1023/A:1000933626201.

stand the molecular basis of bacterial traits involved in plant–microbe interaction. Multipurpose bioinoculant. 4 Plant–Microbe Symbiosis: Perspectives and Applications

from book Plant Microbe Symbiosis: Fundamentals and Advances (p. 19-145). Plant–Microbe Symbiosis: Perspectives and Applications. Chapter · June 2013 with 1,573 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. stand the molecular basis of bacterial traits involved in plant–microbe interaction. 4 Plant–Microbe Symbiosis: Perspectives and Applications. 122. is a potential component of such management systems.

Beneficial microbes have a positive impact on the productivity and fitness of the host plant. A better understanding of the biological impacts and underlying mechanisms by which the host derives these benefits will help to address concerns around global food production and security. The recent development of omics-based technologies has broadened our understanding of the molecular aspects of beneficial plant-microbe symbiosis.

ISBN-13: 978-0792329855.

Plant microbe interaction is a complex relationship that can have various . Plant-Microbe Interaction: An Approach to Sustainable Agriculture. Devendra K. Choudhary

Plant microbe interaction is a complex relationship that can have various beneficial impacts on both the communities. An urgent need of today’s world is to get high crop yields in an ecofriendly manner. It illustrates how the basic knowledge can be amalgamated with advanced technology to design the future bioformulations. Choudhary.

The Arabidopsis Book. Teaching Tools in Plant Biology. Of the many associations formed between plants and microbes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, in which plants and fungi of the Glomeromycota engage, is one of the most widespread and ancient (Smith and Read, 2008).

Long-term close-knit interactions between symbiotic microbes and their host can alter host immune system responses to other microorganisms, including pathogens, and are required to maintain proper homeostasis. The immune system is a host defense system consisting of anatomical physical barriers as well as physiological and cellular responses, which protect the host against harmful microorganisms while limiting host responses to harmless symbionts.

Описание: Plant microbe interaction is a complex relationship that can have various beneficial impacts on both the communities

Описание: Plant microbe interaction is a complex relationship that can have various beneficial impacts on both the communities.

Both soil and air teem with microbes, many of which affect plant growth and health through symbiotic relationships ranging from the clearly beneficial, e.g. mycorrhizas and rhizobial infections that supplement plant nutrition, to the clearly harmful, e.g. pathogenic infections that reduce crop yield or destroy forests. Modern molecular approaches make it possible not only to identify all the organisms that comprise complex microbial communities but to understand their interactions with plants. Researchers with expertise in different symbiotic systems were able to share such knowledge at the First New Phytologist Symposium held in York, November 1995. The collected papers illustrate the molecular techniques available now and describe those being developed for the future. They present up-to-the-minute information in a style that makes it accessible to final year students and postgraduates as well as to those actively involved in researching symbiosis.