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by Richard. Ellis

Download Men and Whales fb2
Author: Richard. Ellis
ISBN: 0709047339
Language: English
Pages: 496 pages
Category: Biological Sciences
Publisher: Robert Hale; First Edition edition (1992)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: txt azw mobi mbr
FB2 size: 1391 kb | EPUB size: 1850 kb | DJVU size: 1525 kb
Sub: Math

Richard Ellis is a celebrated authority on marine biology and America’s foremost marine life artist whose work has been exhibited worldwide

Ever since a human being first came across a dead whale and realized. Richard Ellis is a celebrated authority on marine biology and America’s foremost marine life artist whose work has been exhibited worldwide. Books by Richard Ellis. Mor. rivia About Men and Whales.

urn:acs6:menwhales00elli:pdf:b7d-7543ab6f4f56 urn:acs6:menwhales00elli:epub:504-9acafa0b9061.

In this copiously illustrated book, Richard Ellis delineates the complex history of men and whales. He tells the story of the world's first commercial whalers, the Basques of tenth-century France and Spain; the birth of whaling as an industry during the settlement of New Zealand and Australia; the worldwide movement to protect the whale; and even the origins of the unicorn myth (a whale was responsible). This is the first comprehensive history of the whale's turbulent and always controversial relationship with humankind.

Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator

Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator.

Authoritative history of man's relationship with whales, presented in lively, straightforward prose.

The celebrated marine writer-artist Richard Ellis delineates in this copiously illustrated book the complex history of men and whales.

The shadowy figure of Leviathan has haunted the dreams of humans for millennia, figuring in the folklore, literature, and religion of many cultures. The celebrated marine writer-artist Richard Ellis delineates in this copiously illustrated book the complex history of men and whales. Lively, authoritative text is interwoven with photos, paintings, drawings, and maps to provide a comprehensive history of the whales' turbulent-and always onship with humankind. Over 250 illustrations.

Richard Ellis is a celebrated authority on marine biology and America’s foremost marine life artist whose work has been exhibited worldwide. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever.

Men and Whales is a history of world-wide whaling beginning with the Basque peoples of France and Spain, about 900 . Richard Ellis is one of America's most celebrated marine artists & writers. and continuing through most of the twentieth century and the end of whaling. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. Ellis makes his home in New York City.

xv + 542p, illustrated, hardcover. xv + 542p, illustrated, hardcover.

Comments (7)
Mikarr
Good book and lots of pics.
MisterMax
Illustrated beautifully, these tales will astonish. Herman Melville would have borrowed this book too to help him write MOBY DICK; of course, Ellis leans on Herman at times as well.
I don't think I will ever finish this book; I just don't want it to end. I will be referring again and again to it as I write my own story of the Seven Seas' wonders and their plunderers. Yes, PLUNDERERS, for, Ellis writes that men will never have enough of the sea.
LONUDOG
GREAT!!
Uafrmaine
With Men & Whales (1991), Ellis, a marine biologist, painter, and prolific writer, provides the most comprehensive account of the history of whaling ever published. In thirteen chapters, Ellis introduces you to the whales hunted (each of which include a painting done by Ellis himself), man's first encounters with whales, early Icelandic and Basque whaling, open-boat whaling from shore, the rise of Yankee sperm whaling in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, bowhead, right, and gray whaling (the last of which involved hunting whales in lagoons), the introduction of modern hunting techniques by Thomas Welcome Roys and Svend Foyn, aboriginal whaling, modern whaling in the Antarctic and elsewhere, the beginnings of the International Whaling Commission and the subsequent "whaling olympics" that resulted from it, the trade's decline through over-exploitation and the following anti-whaling movement, and finally whaling after the moratorium and how our perceptions of whales have changed (e.g. the chapter includes a section entitled "California's Love Affair with the Gray Whale", which chronicles the rise of the whale watching industry off California). Most chapters end with an interlude, detailing such things as social life aboard a 19th century whaleship, belugas, narwhals, fashion as it relates to the whaling industry, etc. The book includes several simple maps (some more useful than others) and a number of black-and white paintings, drawings, and photographs illustrating various aspects of our relationship with whales, from their exhibition to their death at our hands.

I would've given this book five stars had it not been for Ellis's maddening habit of making countless strange little mistakes (a problem in many of his other books), resulting in him contradicting not only his sources but at times himself. For example, the entire section on the Spitsbergen whaling dispute is full of these little inaccuracies, including getting the number and nationality of ships wrong (he claimed the English met a German vessel off Bear Island in 1612 when the first German ships didn't reach Spitsbergen until the 1640s, and apparently completely forgot about the French vessels there in 1613) as well as dates (the Dutch first came upon Jan Mayen in 1614, not 1611; he also gave the wrong date for the second Dutch wintering - 1635-36 instead of 1634-35 - and claimed the first crew that overwintered all died when in fact the first crew survived and it was the second crew that had perished). Ellis claims that there were "well over a thousand men" at the Dutch whaling settlement of Smeerenburg (where the above-mentioned men had wintered) by 1622, but then quotes a Dutch archaeologist who states it had only about 200 inhabitants at its peak. In another section, in the caption of a photo showing the Akutan whaling station, he states that the station was located in the Pribilof Islands, even though the station is named for the very island it is on, which is in the Aleutians. I could give a number of other instance of minor mistakes like this (e.g. giving the date of the establishment of the first modern whaling station in Newfoundland as 1888 instead of the proper 1898), but these should illustrate my point well enough. In summary, despite being the best introduction to the history of whaling there is, it is still far from perfect.
Fonceiah
For nature lovers, the descriptions of whaling practices may be difficult and painful to read. But, if you are intersted in maritime history, this book has a whole lot to offer. Ellis has several 'interludes' throughout the book that describe life aboard a whaling ship in addition to some amazing stories of shipwrecks and mutiny on the high seas. One would think that the whaling industry had hit it's peak in the late 19th and early 20th century. But the sad truth is that it wasn't until the mid 20th century that whaling hit it's peak. The later chapters in the book describe the 'modern' whaling practices. These chapters tell the saddest tales of men and whales. The pictures of 'factory' ships used for whaling clearly illustrate the brutality and butchery of the modern whaling industry. It is profoundly sad to think that the brunt of the human attack on whales occured so recently. Several times, Ellis mentions that certain populations of whales may be depleted to such an extent that they may never recover. But, he leaves us with hope at the end of the book with a good discussion on the international moratorium on whaling.
Ohatollia
Very interesting book and artwork.
Mavegelv
I never knew what whaling was really about and this book starts at the beginning and goes to modern times. One take away, the whalers were not after the meat just the fat for oil. I never thought they would not harvest the meat too.