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by Peter Capstick

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Author: Peter Capstick
ISBN: 1571571175
Language: English
Pages: 178 pages
Category: Biological Sciences
Publisher: Safari Press (September 18, 1998)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: mbr mobi lit doc
FB2 size: 1833 kb | EPUB size: 1527 kb | DJVU size: 1216 kb
Sub: Math

Maneaters is the first Capstick I read and I immediately became a huge fa. This book is that multiplied by a hundred and there is no better newscaster than Peter Hathaway Capstick!

Up 'til Maneaters, my level of interest in such stories was directly related to the events themselves; . shark devours swimmer as horrified beachcombers look on" would be better than "man escapes close call when black bear enters tent. 24 people found this helpful.

Capstick spent much of his life in Africa, a l Peter Hathaway Capstick was an American hunter and author. Born in New Jersey and educated at (although did not graduate from) the University of Virginia, he walked away from a successful Wall Street career shortly before his thirtieth birthday to become a professional hunter, first in Central and South America and later (and most famously) in Africa. Capstick spent much of his life in Africa, a land he called his "source of inspiration.

Peter Hathaway Capstick (1940–1996) was an American hunter and author. He was born in New Jersey and educated at the University of Virginia although he was not a graduate

Peter Hathaway Capstick (1940–1996) was an American hunter and author. He was born in New Jersey and educated at the University of Virginia although he was not a graduate. Capstick walked away from a successful Wall Street career shortly before his thirtieth birthday to become a professional hunter. His hunting career began in Central and South America and culminated with hunts in Africa for which he is best known.

121 results for peter capstick. MANEATERS Peter Hathaway Capstick Leon Parson HBDJ 1981 Petersen Adventure Book.

Peter Hathaway Capstick Books - The complete collection of Peter . Peter Hathaway Capstick (1940 - 1996) was an American professional hunter and author.

Peter Hathaway Capstick Books - The complete collection of Peter Hathaway Capstick's African hunting books. He was born in New Jersey and left a Wall Street career shortly before his thirtieth birthday to become a professional hunter, first in Central and South America and later in Africa. Peter Hathaway Capstick. Peter Capstick On Hunting Dangerous Game.

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Maneaters by Peter H. Capstick. His Books, A Man Called Lion, The African Adventurers: A Return To Silent Places, Death in a Lonely Land, Death in the Dark Continent, Death in the Long Grass, Death in the Silent Places, The Last Ivory Hunter, Last Horizons, Maneaters, Peter Capstick's Africa : A Return To The Long Grass, Sands of Silence, Safari: the Last Adventure, Warrior: the Legend of Colonel. Richard Meinertzhagen. Last Horizons, Hunting, Fishing & Shooting On Five Continents by Peter H.

Peter Capstick is a classic hunting writer. This book is a collection of short stories about hunting dangerous game on the continents of Africa and South America. There is a good bit of "campfire humor and wisdom" that flavors most of the stories. If you have ever thought of hunting Cape Buffalo or "big cats" at night this book should either energize you or scare you out of the whole idea!!!

Veteran adventurer Capstick explores the wide world of maneaters―creatures who regard Homo Sapiens as just another meal ticket.
Comments (7)
Ghordana
Only one thing to say: read it with a nightlight on and prepare to jump in fright if any noise startles you while you read this book. Maneaters is a recounting of many true tales of man-eating animals, and believe me when I say you will be afraid of the dark after reading this.
Quamar
This is essentially a summary of Peters own experiences and those of other hunters of big dangerous game. There is little doubt in my mind that Peter Capstick is far more skilled a writer of this genre than Robert Ruark who also wrote about big game hunting in Africa. Where Peter Capstick excels is that he does not allow his ego to write his work for him. The pages of this book come to life. You are there facing a wounded buffalo or hungry lion. You are crawling through thorn bushes searching for an angry leopard. The only way of testing this is to read the book. You will enjoy all of dangers
Lanin
Maneaters is the first Capstick I read and I immediately became a huge fan. I have read accounts of animals attacking people (having lived in Alaska I was well studied in all of the bear attack books) but I soon found out that a Capstick book is a completely different animal. Up 'til Maneaters, my level of interest in such stories was directly related to the events themselves; i.e. "shark devours swimmer as horrified beachcombers look on" would be better than "man escapes close call when black bear enters tent." Capstick, on the other hand, is seemingly able to take a news clipping and make you feel like you are the one getting stomped into a puddle by that rogue elephant.
Maneaters basically goes chapter by chapter through all of nature's species that have, in significant numbers, one of two qualities. Either they have taken to the consumption of human flesh, bones, hair or other parts; or they have typically found enjoyment in tap-dancing on, poking holes in, delimbing, tenderizing, or poisoning unfortunate, unwary people.
Capstick goes back through history and bring to life true cases of human/animal encounters. The entire book is case after case of attacks or close calls. He does an excellent job of explaining the circumstances, events, and outcomes of each entry and while the book is entirely a collection of story stories, it flows nicely and is a fast read.
Everybody turns up the television when the news comes on and says someone was mauled by a bear or bitten by a shark. This book is that multiplied by a hundred and there is no better newscaster than Peter Hathaway Capstick!
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This is just a very engaging book, that I'd recommend to anyone who like a very well told TRUE LIFE adventure!
Purebinder
I have most of Capstick's books. This is another one that I will read again and again.
Nafyn
This book will make you wonder about all the times you walked to you're car, in the early morning hours, alone in the dark. What might have been watching you. What might have swam past you while you were swimming. Its a good Capstick book but not his greatest. Read it but if you have other Capstick book on you're wish list save this for later.
Llanonte
All of Capstick's books are incredible reads. He's a reader's author. This book is right up there with "Death in the Long Grass," and am incredibly fast read.
I got this book, because the topic of maneaters is interesting to me. There's a certain primal thrill to the idea that--in a world where playground equipment is now made of plastic with rounded edges and guard rails--there are still big mean critters that pose a threat. The book sticks to the topic well and devotes chapters to many of the main maneaters including sharks, crocodiles, lions, tigers, leopards, bears, and so on.

What didn't thrill me is the writing--and perhaps the writer himself. To be fair, this book was published in 1980. Maybe some of these animals were still in that "misunderstood" stage at the time of Chapstick's writing, but he seems to view wildlife in general as disposable and of little value beyond hunting trophies. As an example, in his very first chapter on sharks, he writes of how he was snorkeling once on a guided trip and speared a fish in shallow ocean water. Suddenly, a hammerhead shark darted past him. It went after the struggling fish that had been speared, but the author apparently interpreted this as an attack on himself.

Now, it may be debatable whether he was in danger while in the water (I'd argue he wasn't), but he definitely was under no threat once he climbed out of the water back onto the guide's boat. Nonetheless, he grabbed his .357 magnum revolver, and began firing shots into the ocean at the shark. The shark was evidently not harmed much (bullets lose speed rapidly in water), but the author went on to joke about how if readers see a hammerhead with bullet holes in its fins, they might know why.

I don't mean this as PETA-type rant. I hunt and I've shot animals. But Chapstick's "hunting" anecdotes don't seem too far removed from the 1800's days when train passengers would shoot bison to die and rot.... just because they could. In fact, of all of Chapstick's personal accounts throughout the book, I don't know if there was a single example in which he was truly in danger of being killed or eaten by the animals he describes. Instead, the actual maneater accounts in the book involve other other people and read more like a college research paper. He compiles names, dates, and quotes from various other sources. This would be fine if he left things objective, but he seems unable to resist putting words into other peoples mouths or thoughts into other people's heads. An example that stood out especially to me was when Chapstick shared some of Jim Corbett's accounts of man-eating leopards and tigers. Corbett himself was an author and hunter of maneaters (and I'd venture to say he was better than Chapstick on both accounts) but tended to have a very different outlook on life in general than Chapstick. He loved all the little nuances of nature and felt some measure of regret even when shooting maneating tigers and leopards, but he ultimately cared more for the poor people he was protecting. From Chapstick's interpretations, however, you'd guess that Corbett hated leopards and had little patience for people.

My last thought on his writing is that one or two sentences could be removed from nearly every paragraph without losing any useful information. The reason for this is that Chapstick constantly tries to add funny quips or metaphores that really add nothing to the content. I imagine some readers find them amusing. I found them distracting.

Overall, it's an interesting topic and the book has some good information in it, but I felt like I had to sort through a lot of egotistical BS to get to stuff worth reading.