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by Patrick Moore

Download Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy fb2
Author: Patrick Moore
ISBN: 0521899354
Language: English
Pages: 586 pages
Category: Astronomy & Space Science
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (March 21, 2011)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: docx lrf doc lrf
FB2 size: 1848 kb | EPUB size: 1336 kb | DJVU size: 1785 kb
Sub: Math

All astronomers should be grateful to Patrick Moore, to his co-author Robin Rees, and to their team of consultants, for the immense labour that . In many ways, the Data Book of Astronomy is the late Sir Patrick's magnum opus.

All astronomers should be grateful to Patrick Moore, to his co-author Robin Rees, and to their team of consultants, for the immense labour that went into this book: it is surely unique in gathering such a wide and eclectic range of information into a single volume. It will be an invaluable reference work for serious observers-but it is equally suitable for armchair browsers, and indeed for anyone who is curious about what lies beyond the Earth. Martin Rees, Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics, University of Cambridge.

Non-optical astronomy; 31. The history of astronomy; 32. Astronomers; 33. Glossary; Index. Habrecht was a professor of astronomy and mathematics at the University of Strasbourg and a doctor of both medicine and philosophy

Non-optical astronomy; 31. Habrecht was a professor of astronomy and mathematics at the University of Strasbourg and a doctor of both medicine and philosophy. He was the son of another Isaac Habrecht (1544–1620), who with his brother Josias (1552–1575) was a clockmaker in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. The Habrecht brothers were commissioned to build Strasbourg’s second astronomical clock, completed in 1574.

Sir Alfred Patrick Caldwell-Moore, CBE, Hon FRS, FRAS, known as Patrick Moore, was an English amateur astronomer, who is the most well known English promoter of astronomy. Moore wrote numerous books on the subject, as well as make public, television and radio appearances, over the course of his long life. Sir Alfred Patrick Caldwell-Moore, CBE, Hon FRS, FRAS, known as Patrick Moore, was an English amateur astronomer, who is the most well known English promoter of astronomy.

Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy.

by Patrick Moore, Robin Rees. Packed with up-to-date astronomical data about the Solar System, our Galaxy and the wider Universe, this is a one-stop reference for astronomers of all levels

by Patrick Moore, Robin Rees. Packed with up-to-date astronomical data about the Solar System, our Galaxy and the wider Universe, this is a one-stop reference for astronomers of all levels.

Packed with up-to-date astronomical data about the Solar System, our Galaxy and the wider Universe, this is a one-stop . Full of facts and figures, this is the only book you need to look up data about astronomy

Packed with up-to-date astronomical data about the Solar System, our Galaxy and the wider Universe, this is a one-stop reference for astronomers of all levels. Full of facts and figures, this is the only book you need to look up data about astronomy. It is destined to become the standard reference for everyone interested in astronomy.

Patrick Moore, British Astronomical Association, London, Robin Rees, Canopus Publishing Limited. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Online publication date: June 2012.

Packed with up-to-date astronomical data about the Solar System, our Galaxy and the wider Universe, this is a one-stop reference for astronomers of all levels. It gives the names, positions, sizes and other key facts of all the planets and their satellites; discusses the Sun in depth, from sunspots to solar eclipses; lists the dates for cometary returns, close-approach asteroids, and significant meteor showers; and includes 88 star charts, with the names, positions, magnitudes and spectra of the stars, along with key data on nebulae and clusters. Full of facts and figures, this is the only book you need to look up data about astronomy. It is destined to become the standard reference for everyone interested in astronomy.
Comments (5)
Lo◘Ve
Patrick Moore is a great authority in astronomy and his reports on astronomical events of the year are a great reference to amateur and professional astronomers. This great handbook provides data used for astronomical studies. This edition carries on that tradition and contains many interesting discussions, among which is the brief chapter on the evolution of the Universe. Not all astronomers will agree with the statement that the Universe began at time zero and that is no time before that - certainly the theoreticians who work on the multiverse concept will disagree. But, it is a great reference
Amerikan_Volga
In many ways, the Data Book of Astronomy is the late Sir Patrick's magnum opus. I had the privilege of joining Patrick and Robin Rees at Patrick's home in Sussex to compile this edition of the Data Book (I did the section on the Solar System) and I was able to appreciate at first hand Patrick Moore's astonishing, encyclopaedic knowledge of real things in the cosmos. This is a great book, a tribute to the finest observational astronomer of our era.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
I downloaded the Kindle edition to my iPad. The subject coverage is wide and answers most questions for the curious. The only disappointment is the lack of clarity of the data tables. They appear to be facsimiles of the originals and the rendering of the print is not crisp. When one normally enlarges a page on the iPad the font is rendered and is beautifully clear. The tables in this book contain a lot of interesting data but some of it is blurred. I'm sure more effort could have been put in to make the tables eBook-friendly.
Bine
Overall, fine. Read from cover to cover, but it's not a keeper. But here's what irritated me about the book:

- No color photographs or photos of the planets. Many people need visuals to truly appreciate the data. It's filled with countless boring b+w photos of planetary moons, and craters though.
- Constant, sometimes bizarre little notes from his personal experience, adding nothing of importance.
- Makes two insulting remarks - calling President Jimmy Carter's UFO experience a result of seeing Venus. Absurd, Carter was an amateur astronomer and has said it was not Venus. Also, he says that "Young Earth Creationism" and "Intelligent Design" are the same thing. ID has nothing to do with the age of the earth.
- Constantly referring to the measure of time as "thousand million years" instead of billion. But I cannot fault him for this, as it is the term used in British English.
Muniath
I can't believe this could come in a Kindle edition because the data tables are so huge. It's an essential reference for anyone who wants to have the near galaxy at one's fingertips. It just has lists and lists of facts, such as the name and size of all the features (seas, etc.) of the Moon. I enjoyed this book as much as I enjoyed The Elements. It's not really for a casual reader but for any libraries or anyone interested in astronomical data, it is a great purchase.