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by Adrian Berry

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Author: Adrian Berry
ISBN: 0340232315
Language: English
Pages: 176 pages
Category: Astronomy & Space Science
Publisher: Coronet Books; New edition edition (February 1, 1979)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: mbr lit azw rtf
FB2 size: 1209 kb | EPUB size: 1634 kb | DJVU size: 1197 kb
Sub: Math

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Iron Sun: Crossing The Universe Through Black Holes.

Adrian Berry explains simply and clearly the real nature of black holes-and presents a plan for man-made leaps . But the book does convey the scientific optimism that was still alive in the 1970s before all but cratering in the years since.

Adrian Berry explains simply and clearly the real nature of black holes-and presents a plan for man-made leaps into the cosmos t. .Publisher: Warner Books (October 1978).

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Find sources: "Adrian Berry, 4th Viscount Camrose" – news · newspapers · books .

Find sources: "Adrian Berry, 4th Viscount Camrose" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (April 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). The iron sun: crossing the universe through black holes (London: Cape, 1977), ISBN 0-340-23231-5. From apes to astronauts (London: Daily Telegraph, 1980)

The Iron Sun : Crossing the Universe Through Black Holes. Imprint Coronet Books. Publication City/Country London, United Kingdom.

The Iron Sun : Crossing the Universe Through Black Holes. By (author) Adrian Berry.

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I was swept away with the various concepts and theories that Mr. Berry wrote about

I was swept away with the various concepts and theories that Mr. Berry wrote about. Although some had a "Star Trek" like feel to them, I felt that his ideas were very promising, and the way that he proposed them were both intrigueing and informative. I look forward to reading any of his works with the same enthusiasm.

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Heavy metal, black and silver Fallen matter of the sun Pours itself into a place Where there was never . The lyrics to the song were inspired by the 1977 book, The Iron Sun: Crossing The Universe Through Black Holes, by Adrian Berry.

Heavy metal, black and silver Fallen matter of the sun Pours itself into a place Where there was never, never one! By starlight, the heaviest will rise up Magnetic mirror, scattered bodies slow All chaos of matter, river of fire A night sea crossing, the cosmic fluid flows. Several of the lyrics to the first verse are derived from chapter titles of the book.

The Iron Sun: Crossing the Universe Through Black Holes. When a huge sun collapses into a black hole, so goes the conjecture, a companion white hole instantly appears at some other spot in spacetime. White Holes: Cosmic Gushers in the Universe. This could explain the incredible outpouring of energy from the quasars, those mysterious objects, apparently far beyond our galaxy, that nobody yet understands. Was the big bang which created our universe the white hole that exploded into existence after a previous universe collapsed into its black hole?

Speculates on the real nature of black holes and outlines a plan for the future construction of these phenomena in space near enough to earth to allow instantaneous travel to the stars
Comments (3)
Molace
The Iron Sun is an extremely interesting look at the possibility of constructing a black hole (a series of them actually) of about ten solar masses roughly one light year from the sun and using them (and the presumed "white hole") on the other end as a means of interstellar travel. Given that his book was written back when the study of black holes and the theories about them was literally in its infancy, the science appears quite good.

Berry admits there are huge things he is not sure of or that even if an "Einstein-Rosen Bridge" is even possible. And he is quite candid in acknowledging that there is absolutely no way at this point to estimate where a hypothetical "white hole" might emerge and even less knowledge about if a black hole constructed at a distant location in the galaxy would produce a "white hole" emerging anywhere near Earth.

But the book does convey the scientific optimism that was still alive in the 1970s before all but cratering in the years since.

Definitely worth buying an reading.
Froststalker
The author describes the work needed and the idea behind using black holes as space travel devices. A major hole in this theory, not unlike the time machine postulated by Frank Tipler Jr., is that we must first overcome the problem of inertia! Certainly a non-trivial problem in itself. The book describes the project needed to build an "Iron Sun", out of ferric dust in the neighboorhood of our solar system. Borrowing heavily from Von Neumann, he describes a construction device capable of reproduction that could be turned loose some 1 light year away (another trivial event!) and left to push together a self-contracting pile of iron dust that would collape into a ten-solar mass black hole. He goes on in some detail to describe the problems that this might create, physically and politically, not to mention economically. Also is a rather sketchy version of how two holes could be build and an Einstein-Rosen Bridge be somehow built between them, the science is hazy at this point. There is no mention of quantum effects such as non-locality that could account for this action. Even though, I enjoyed the book throughly and recommend it to anyone intereted in black holes or engineering projects in space.
Rocky Basilisk
I was swept away with the various concepts and theories that Mr. Berry wrote about. Although some had a "Star Trek" like feel to them, I felt that his ideas were very promising, and the way that he proposed them were both intrigueing and informative. I look forward to reading any of his works with the same enthusiasm.