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by E.B. Lewis,Hester Bass

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Author: E.B. Lewis,Hester Bass
ISBN: 0763669199
Language: English
Pages: 32 pages
Category: History
Publisher: Candlewick (January 27, 2015)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: txt azw mobi docx
FB2 size: 1264 kb | EPUB size: 1925 kb | DJVU size: 1826 kb
Sub: Kids

Throughout this engaging story about Huntsville's peaceful uprising, Bass skillfully intertwines .

Throughout this engaging story about Huntsville's peaceful uprising, Bass skillfully intertwines the history of the civil rights movement. Lewis's watercolor illustrations portray momentous events like snapshots in a photo album. Seeds of Freedom" is a stirring revelation of how the skirmishes and successes of one community caused a giant ripple across the nation. One disappointment - I thought the metaphor of growing seeds of freedom was powerful, but I felt like it was dropped towards the end of the book.

At its core, Seeds of Freedom is about making good choices.

Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama by Hester Bass and illustrated by E. B. Lewis Explore a little-known story of the Civil Rights movement, in which black and white citizens in one Alabama city worked together nonviolently to end segregation. Mention the Civil Rights era in Alabama, and most people recall images of terrible violence. But something different was happening in Huntsville. At its core, Seeds of Freedom is about making good choices. Resolving confict through peaceful means is not a talent everyone is born with; its a skill that requires training and practice.

Seeds of Freedom book. SEEDS OF FREEDOM tells the little-known Civil Rights-era story of how Huntsville, Alabama sort of overcame segregation in the early sixties in a sort of civilized manner. This civic evolution moved forward despite Alabama governor George Wallace’s racist demagoguery, which was infecting a new generation and inspiring horrific and oft-deadly acts of terrorism against blacks all over the South.

Hester Bass; E B Lewis. Unlike other cities in Alabama, the integration of Huntsville was a mostly peaceful transition. Honest, hopeful, and inspiring.

Written by Hester Bass and Illustrated by . Mention the civil rights era in Alabama and most people recall images of terrible violence. But for the citizens of Huntsville, creativity, courage, and cooperation were the keys to working together to integrate their city and schools in peace. This engaging celebration of a lesser-known chapter in American and African-American history shows how racial discrimination, bullying, and unfairness can be faced successfully with perseverance and ingenuity.

Bass outlines a series of peaceful protests, culminating in the desegregation of Huntsville's stores and businesses within six months. It takes another year to desegregate the schools on September 9, 1963. Lewis's trademark watercolors provide vibrant portraits of people and symbolic objects involved in the nonviolent protests; violence in other parts of the South is depicted in muted dark colors and impressionist representations.

by Hester Bass and . Book Guides, Activities & Lessons 3. Nonfiction Read and Respond Customizable Lesson. 14 Total Resources 2 Awards View Text Complexity Submit Text Complexity. Name Pronunciation with Hester Bass. Name Pronunciation with . ville-History-20th century-Juvenile literature. Huntsville (Al. -Race th century-Juvenile literature. Created by TeachingBooks.

Information about the book, Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama: the Children’s, Hardcover, by Hester Bass (Candlewick Press, Jan 27, 2015). In an engaging celebration of this lesser-known chapter in American and African-American history, author Hester Bass and illustrator E. Lewis show children how racial discrimination, bullying, and unfairness can be faced successfully with perseverance and ingenuity. More books like Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama may be found by selecting the categories below

Hester Bass and illustrator E. Lewis show children how racial discrimination, bullying, and unfairness can be. .

Hester Bass and illustrator E. For the citizens of that city, creativity, courage, and cooperation were the keys to working together to integrate their city and schools in peace.

Integration of Huntsville, Alabama Author: Hester Bass Illustrator: . 10 Responses to Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama by Hester Bass

Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama Author: Hester Bass Illustrator: . Lewis Published January 27th, 2015 by Candlewick Press. Goodreads Summary: Explore a little-known story of the Civil Rights movement, in which black and white citizens in one Alabama city worked together nonviolently to end segregation. 10 Responses to Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama by Hester Bass. Linda Baie says: April 29, 2015 at 8:09 AM.

Explore a little-known story of the civil rights movement, in which black and white citizens in one Alabama city worked together nonviolently to end segregation.Mention the civil rights era in Alabama, and most people recall images of terrible violence. But something different was happening in Huntsville. For the citizens of that city, creativity, courage, and cooperation were the keys to working together to integrate their city and schools in peace. In an engaging celebration of this lesser-known chapter in American and African-American history, author Hester Bass and illustrator E. B. Lewis show children how racial discrimination, bullying, and unfairness can be faced successfully with perseverance and ingenuity.
Comments (7)
Fenius
Well written. Beautiful pictures. True story about the city I've called my own for 35 years.
caif
Beautiful book
LONUDOG
Very enjoyable book
Felhalar
Highly recommend! Was a gift for my mother.
SkroN
good
Sharpbringer
I like this text because it's complex and there's content worthy of close reading and collaborative discussions. Bass, the author, does not just tell a straightforward narrative about what happened in Huntsville, AL; instead her narrative (of sorts) requires the reader to make inferences, to synthesize and grapple. She uses the metaphor of planting and growing seeds of freedom--tapping into what these seeds need to grow - "But the seeds of freedom need news to grow, so another plan is hatched." From there she describes "Blue Jean Sunday" when the African Americans boycotted local businesses and wore denim for Easter in 1962. The way she tells it, though, the reader has to make an inference that this was the "hatched" plan and the reader also has to infer how this was "news" to grow the seeds of freedom. With her audience in mind, the author has provided just enough content for the reader to do this. She continues to build on this idea of "needing news to grow the seeds of freedom" throughout the book.

I'd do the following with intermediate (at least 4th) and higher students (through 6th) -
1) Read this book aloud;
2) then read aloud the author's notes and discuss;
3) then ask the students to return to this book and read excerpts closely with an essential question in mind for discussion and written responses (like "How does Blue Jean Sunday reveal the main idea of collaboration?" or "Explain how the author uses evidence to support the idea that 'seeds of freedom need news to grow.'")

Background knowledge about Jim Crow and segregation would be helpful in understanding this book, but a student could also read this book at the beginning of a unit of study as a way to begin an inquiry into this period. They could generate questions for research along the way. This would be a good opportunity to compare texts on the same topic - even just comparing one page of text from this book with a primary source (news article, photo, memoir, etc.). It would be interesting to research others' perspectives on what the author calls "the peaceful integration of Huntsville, Alabama."

One disappointment - I thought the metaphor of growing seeds of freedom was powerful, but I felt like it was dropped towards the end of the book. For several pages - the metaphor remained at the seed stage. Then late in the book there is one page where the "tender plant of freedom" is mentioned; at the end of that page, I was confused when the author wrote, "Are the seeds of freedom wilting?" I was thinking it should have been "Are the tender plants of freedom wilting?" There is no other mention of the tender plant and then on the last page, the last sentence, after the schools of Huntsville have been integrated, the author writes, "to taste the sweet fruit homegrown from the seeds of freedom." It felt like a leap given the heavy emphasis on the seeds earlier in the book. BUT why not have students go back and think about where there are tender plants and how they might have wilted and then how the fruit was growing and so forth? This metaphor could serve as a frame for thinking about other events in the civil rights movement and how it took time and perseverance for change to occur.
Dori
Summary: While other southern towns were rocked by violence during the civil rights movement, Huntsville, Alabama worked hard to integrate peacefully. Known as “the space center of the universe”, Huntsville had a bit more of a national reputation as a place where rockets were being designed and built. But life wasn’t as good for all its citizens, and they decided to take some of the actions that were taking place in other cities across the south. There were lunch counter sit-ins, marches, and demonstrations. When a dentist’s wife and baby daughter were put in jail, Huntsville found itself in the national headlines. The town had more at stake, with the threat of losing federal funding. Slowly, businesses started to allow blacks, then the hospital, bowling alley, and movie theater. School integration proved a little rockier, but on September 9, 1963, the first African-American child entered a white public school without incident.

Pros: This is an inspiring story of dignity and courage demonstrated by both blacks and whites in Huntsville. The uglier side of integration isn’t ignored, but the main theme is planting seeds of peace and what it took to make them grow in Huntsville. The present tense voice lends an immediacy to the story, more than 50 years after it unfolded.

Cons: While this is in picture book format, there’s quite a bit of text. Kids in the primary grades would need a good deal of guidance to get through it.
Lest the struggles for civil rights be forgotten, it’s important to look at the conditions along the road to freedom. Admittedly, we still have a long way to go due to hatred and prejudice. Many people fought and died for the incremental freedoms we now have. Riots and bombings happened many times. But, in Huntsville, a city that also saw the development of rockets for the space program, the movement forward was not marked by violence. Finally, citizens remembered that white merchants relied so much on the revenue provided by blacks. At long last, schools were integrated. Many whites tried to prevent blacks from entering “their” school, but several white students also enrolled in the formerly black schools.

The story is greatly enhanced by the wonderful, action-filled illustrations of E.B. Lewis. The second grade reader can almost feel like she’s there, in the 1960s. A particularly poignant drawing of a young girl with impressions of her feet is memorable.