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by Francine Prose

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Author: Francine Prose
ISBN: 0060080825
Language: English
Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Publisher: Joanna Cotler; 1St Edition edition (April 1, 2003)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: doc lrf rtf txt
FB2 size: 1535 kb | EPUB size: 1776 kb | DJVU size: 1749 kb
Sub: Kids

Francine Prose (born April 1, 1947) is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and critic. She is a Visiting Professor of Literature at Bard College, and was formerly president of PEN American Center

Francine Prose (born April 1, 1947) is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and critic. She is a Visiting Professor of Literature at Bard College, and was formerly president of PEN American Center. Born in Brooklyn, Prose graduated from Radcliffe College in 1968. She received the PEN Translation Prize in 1988 and received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1991. Prose's novel The Glorious Ones has been adapted into a musical with the same title by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty

Francine Prose is the author of twenty works of fiction. Her novel A Changed Man won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and Blue Angel was a finalist for the National Book Award

Francine Prose is the author of twenty works of fiction. Her novel A Changed Man won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and Blue Angel was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her most recent works of nonfiction include the highly acclaimed Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and the New York Times bestseller Reading Like a Writer.

Francine Prose might well find herself on one of those lists of oddly appropriate congruency between name and occupation. Indeed the prolific writer has demonstrated an enviable versatility in her witty fictional works and journalistic forays. Yet at her best, her voice is far from prosaic, conveying the distilled, sympathetic wisdom of the unfaltering observer. That characteristic pervades her treasurably evocative, literary travel memoir Sicilian Odyssey-part of the ongoing National Geographic Directions Series.

School has become a prison I think Francine Prose is a great writer, but she has a tin ear about how kids actually speak.

School has become a prison. I think Francine Prose is a great writer, but she has a tin ear about how kids actually speak. The dialogue felt so contrived and stilted I couldn't really give the story a chance.

Also by Francine Prose. Chapter One. The day after Lula’s lawyer called to tell her she was legal, three Albanian guys showed up in a brand-new black Lexus SUV. She had been staring out her window at the drizzly afternoon and thinking that the mulberry tree on Mister Stanley’s front lawn had waited to drop its last few leaves until it knew she was watching.

ZEN AND THE ART OF FAKING IT Book Trailer, by Liz Friend - Продолжительность: 1:33 friendecoisd. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart.

Treat yourself to a great read.

Illustration by Jillian Tamaki

Illustration by Jillian Tamaki. Distract me. I cry enough. Though some books I love - Mrs. Gaskell’s Life of Charlotte Brontë, Kosztolanyi’s Skylark - are almost unbearably sad. Books make me laugh out loud so rarely I remember the ones that have: Hunter Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. After all these years, it may be impossible to trace the sequence of facials, spa treatments, mud baths, cosmetic procedures, lifts and staples, collagen implants, outpatient touch-ups, tannings, Botox injections, cyst and growth removals, and stem-cell injections that have caused a 72-year-old man to have the face of a 9-year-old Filipino girl.

Matching gorgeous prose to gorgeous artworks, Prose responds to each image as a moment of theatrical revelation, sensual or spiritual, and frequently both

So many books, so little time. Choice: True Stories of Birth, Contraception, Infertility, Adoption, Single Parenthood, and Abortion. Matching gorgeous prose to gorgeous artworks, Prose responds to each image as a moment of theatrical revelation, sensual or spiritual, and frequently both. Boston Sunday GlobeIn Caravaggio, New York Times bestselling author Francine Prose (Golde. School has become a prison. No one knows wh. here's no way to stop it. Blue Angel.

Gina Apostol objects to Francine Prose’s objections to Sadia Shepard.

The shootings in Pleasant Valley were fifty miles away, but at Central High a grief and crisis counselor is hired, security is increased, and privileges are being taken away.

No one knows why.

If you break the new rules the punishment is severe. And the rules keep changing every day.

School feels like a prison.

It's for their protection, yet fifteen-year-old Tom Bishop and his friends learn that things are far more sinister than they seem. Students and teachers begin disappearing.

There's no way to stop it.

Nationally best-selling and acclaimed author Francine Prose has written a haunting novel about what happens when protection goes too far and what it means to have freedom extinguished -- in the name of safety.

Comments (7)
Dorizius
This is a very tricky book to deal with young adults.
The book revolves around a school shooting and how it affects neighboring schools.
The main problem with this book is that the antics of the adults tend to be overwhelmingly unrealistic. The characters take on a "pod person" effect that makes them care less about the children in the book.
The author takes a very serious subject-- school shootings and mixes it with an outlandish plot -- an overzealous administrator who wants to rule the school.
Shezokha
I had to get this book for school, and after i read it i was confused and sad. it was kind of a cliff hanger. plus, i wouldnt get it if i were you. it kind of messes with your mind
Lavivan
Great book! I love it!
Buriwield
This book came to me very quickly and in perfect condition! I paid a great price for it and plan on purchasing more books in the near future.
Anazan
In short, this book pulls you in almost immediately, great for somebody who is looking for something to visualize easily
Nidora
The cover had folds and worn look also a few pages had the top torn but overall can be read.
Taun
Great!!
I read this book early in high school and it shook me pretty thoroughly, reading it felt like a sped up version of what was happening with zero tolerance rules/policies, the school to prison pipeline, and some of the bizarre campaigns and efforts the school was making to push weird, cult-like ideas onto us in concentrated sessions.

I knew a lot of people hurt by zero tolerance policies, and I was one of them myself. The absurdity of it, being punished for things that couldn't possibly be more normal, more natural, was just terrifying. You get beat up? Mandatory suspension for involvement in an "incident", weird restrictions on clothing, style, etc.

Some of the reviews say it doesn't sound realistic, but we've seen stories just like many in the book in the real world in the past several years, suspensions and expulsions for changed hair color, wearing a religious hat/token, shaving your head, wearing the wrong makeup, etc. where the situation wasn't resolved until social media brought it national attention. We've also seen kids be sent to school and jail for minor offenses. I myself wrote on somebodies locker and was threatened with arrest and jail time for something that was as minor and ordinary as hell for a teenager to do. The kind of thing that in the 80s would have gotten a note home can now ruin your life, and once in the prison pipeline, with private prisons, you are just a slave to industry, working for nothing.

This book should serve as a wake up call, a warning that we need to be more mindful about our policies, more fair and human-minded in our interpretation of rules, that we need to put deep, serious value into freedom and liberty, because not having it is profoundly dangerous. And if you don't think so, it's only because you are lucky enough to not be one of the lives destroyed by our system.

The writing was solid, as were the plot and the characters, although some of the events could have used more detail, I think it played well towards the lack of information, the fog that happens when people are under so much control.