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by Cynthia L Smith,Jim Madsen

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Author: Cynthia L Smith,Jim Madsen
ISBN: 0060295317
Language: English
Pages: 80 pages
Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Publisher: HarperCollins; 1st edition (April 2, 2002)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: lrf txt rtf lit
FB2 size: 1189 kb | EPUB size: 1438 kb | DJVU size: 1136 kb
Sub: Kids

With its unadorned portrayal of urban Indian life, Shoes is a good book for any elementary-aged reluctant reader, and a necessity for indigenous children everywhere.

With its unadorned portrayal of urban Indian life, Shoes is a good book for any elementary-aged reluctant reader, and a necessity for indigenous children everywhere.

Follow Cynthia Leitich Smith and explore their bibliography from . by Cynthia L Smith, Jim Madsen. In stock on September 22, 2019.

com's Cynthia Leitich Smith Author Page.

Cynthia Leitich Smith (born 1967) is a New York Times best-selling author of fiction for children and young adults. Indian Shoes is a chapter book for ages 7 and up. Published in 2002 by HarperCollins, it was selected for inclusion on the NEA Native American Book List. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, she writes fiction for children centered on the lives of modern-day American Indians. These books are taught widely by teachers in elementary, middle school, high school, and college classrooms. In addition, Smith writes fanciful, humorous picture books and gothic fantasies for ages 14-up.

by Cynthia Leitich Smith & illustrated by Jim Madsen. An excellent choice for younger readers from the author of the bittersweet Rain Is Not My Indian Name (2001).

Home Books for Kids Indian Shoes Indian Shoes Readers Guide Cynthia Leitich Smith writes with wit and candor about what it’s like to grow up as a Seminole-Cherokee boy who is just as happy pounding.

Home Books for Kids Indian Shoes Indian Shoes Readers Guide. Cynthia Leitich Smith writes with wit and candor about what it’s like to grow up as a Seminole-Cherokee boy who is just as happy pounding the pavement in windy Chicago as rowing on a lake in rural Oklahoma.

by Cynthia Leitich Smith. illustrated by Jim Madsen. Indian Shoes is about belonging to family and community, helping neighbors, and sometimes feeling different but most times knowing who you are in the world. A very pleasing first-chapter book from its funny and tender opening salvo to its heartwarming closer. Shoes is a good book for any elementary-aged reluctant reader, and a necessity for indigenous children everywhere. School Library Journal.

item 2 Indian Shoes by Smith, Cynthia L. -Hcover -Indian Shoes by Smith, Cynthia L. -Hcover. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Fiction Books. item 3 NEW Indian Shoes By Cynthia L Smith Hardcover Free Shipping -NEW Indian Shoes By Cynthia L Smith Hardcover Free Shipping. Best-selling in Fiction Books. See all. Create This Book 2 by Moriah Elizabeth 9780692168721.

Author:-Smith, Cynthia Leitich. Read full description. Cynthia Leitich Smith. See details and exclusions. See all 4 brand new listings.

Indian Shoes by Cynthia Leitich Smith, Jim Madsen Jingle Dancer by Cynthia Leitich Smith, illustrated by Cornelius Van Wright & Ying Hwa-Hu: A picture book about Jenna, a contemporary Muscogee girl living in Oklahoma, who desires to honor her family's tradition of dancing.

Indian Shoes by Cynthia Leitich Smith, Jim Madsen. Contemporary Native American Children's and Young Adult Books - Cynthia Leitich Smith. Indian Shoes by Cynthia Leitich Smith is on Maggie’s read shelf. Jingle Dancer by Cynthia Leitich Smith, illustrated by Cornelius Van Wright & Ying Hwa-Hu: A picture book about Jenna, a contemporary Muscogee girl living in Oklahoma, who desires to honor her family's tradition of dancing at a pow-wow. American Indians in Children's Literature. What others are saying.

What do Indian shoes look like, anyway? Like beautiful beaded moccasins...or hightops with bright orange shoelaces?

Ray Halfmoon prefers hightops, but he gladly trades them for a nice pair of moccasins for his Grampa. After all, it's Grampa Halfmoon who's always there to help Ray get in and out of scrapes -- like the time they are forced to get creative after a homemade haircut makes Ray's head look like a lawn-mowing accident.

This collection of interrelated stories is heartwarming and laugh-out-loud funny. Cynthia Leitich Smith writes with wit and candor about what it's like to grow up as a Seminole-Cherokee boy who is just as happy pounding the pavement in windy Chicago as rowing on a take in rural Oklahoma.

Comments (7)
Yananoc
In this collection of six tales about a boy and his grandfather, Ray Halfmoon goes to live with his Grampa Halfmoon in Chicago after Ray's parents were killed in a tornado. They used to live in Oklahoma, and still visit Uncle Leonard and Aunt Wilhelmina once in a while, but Ray can tell that Grampa Halfmoon is very homesick and would like to go to Oklahoma more often. In the title story of these six tales, their beat-up old pickup truck has finally broken down --- there's no way it will take them to Oklahoma. Ray can't do anything about the truck and he can't afford to buy a bus ticket, so Ray is trying to figure out some way to help ease Grampa's homesickness. Would a new pair of Seminole moccasins help? Does Ray have enough money to buy them?
These short stories are written for younger readers who like rhythms and repetition in what they read. The book is divided into episodes about the lives of Ray and his Grampa Halfmoon. It shows their love for each other, and how they try to do things to help each other. Ray learns the lesson of sticking with things that he starts. And both he and Grampa have to figure out how to help the animals they're taking care of during the Christmas holidays when the electricity goes out. Eventually, Ray learns what the biggest thing in life is --- even bigger than the biggest bass in the lake.
--- Reviewed by Tamara Penny
Kulwes
This collection of short stories about Ray and his Grampa Halfmoon is entertaining, heart-warming, and fun. The first story has to do with Ray wanting to buy a pair of moccasins for his Grampa because it reminds him of the old days, but a someone else seems to want to buy them, too. The second is an amusing tale of Ray being a ring-bearer in a wedding. The third, my personal favorite, is a Christmas tale of Ray and Grampa caring for their many neighbors' pets. There are three more stories as well. Each story is filled with poetic descriptions that bring clearly to the mind of the reader the sights, sounds, and smells of Ray's world. The characters are real and each tale made me smile at the end. Very sweet with a touch of humor. As with her picture book, JINGLE DANCER, and her novel, RAIN IS NOT MY INDIAN NAME, Cynthia Leitich Smith uses lyrical language that makes her stories sing and her characters shine. I look forward to reading this book with my daughter.
Zolorn
In this book Ray Halfmoon lives with his Grandfather. It is a collection of 6 short stories about their lives as Seminole-Cherokee living in Chicago. These stories are enduring and heart warming. The stories are:

Indian Shoes
Don't Forget The Pants!
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?
The Accident
Team Colors
Night Fishing

From stories about pants not being delivered with a tux for a wedding, to a Christmas menagerie, these stories will be fun to read as a family again and again. You will find yourself rooting for Ray, and surprised by his grandfather's kindness, gentleness and ingenuity in solving problems and making things right. It is a wonderful book by an amazing author.
Meztihn
My response to INDIAN SHOES is similar to my reaction to Smith's other two books, JINGLE DANCER and RAIN IS NOT MY INDIAN NAME. It is rare to find realistic fiction that captures the lives of today's Native people----stories that present us as we are, not in some mystical, romantic, exotic or savage way. (We are a Pueblo Indian family.) Smith's stories and her fine command of her craft is a treasure in our home. Her stories make us laugh, give us quiet moments for thought, uplift us. As a professor of children's literature, I highly recommend INDIAN SHOES to pre-service and practicing teachers and librarians, and parents who seek literature that provides an authentic look at Native people.
WinDImmortaL
Indian Shoes is a great children's book in that it is simple to read and understand as well as gives a great depiction of what the life is like for the modern Native American. What I really liked was that the book was divided in to several chapters that end up being short stories that all connect to each other. This book was different from many others that usually talk about Native Americans. Instead of being a history or cultural lesson, the book follows a young boy and his grandfather. It talks about everyday situations that any young person could be involved with/relate to such as baseball games, family visits, etc. I would recommend this book to anyone who has a young child (early education group). This is a great start for a young child to read about Native Americans and to break the current stereotypes of what people assume Native Americans to be. It's great practice for reading in general as well as something not usually taught, especially at such a young age. I would not recommend this book for someone above the elementary age level since the book may be too easy of read. However, I would recommend this book if you are doing research on children's literature and want to include this one, specifically a text centering around Native Americans. I would not necessarily recommend this a leisure read for older kids/students simply because it is specifically designed for a younger audience so it would be less of a challenge for them to read and also it is not as informative as a more advanced text would be as to the actual history and culture.
Giamah
My daughter (age 6) and I loved this book, which is about the relationship between a young boy and his grandfather. What was nice about it was the unexpectedness of it. It was not the usual school or historical stories written for this age group. Rather, they are just quirky unusual tales. I also think it is great that Ms. Leitich Smith presents Native Americans not only as traditional, ritualistic people who sit around telling allegorical stories, but as a living, breathing group. As such, this book is the perfect antidote to the usual "Squanto, Friend of the Pilgrims" fare. My daughter lost her grandfather a few years ago, but Indian Shoes captures the essence of that relationship and is wonderful! We won't soon forget Ray and Grandpa Halfmoon.