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by Barry Root,Terry Farish

Download The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup (BCCB BLUE RIBBON PICTURE BOOK AWARDS (AWARDS)) fb2
Author: Barry Root,Terry Farish
ISBN: 0763608343
Language: English
Pages: 40 pages
Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Publisher: Candlewick (May 1, 2003)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: mobi rtf txt lrf
FB2 size: 1192 kb | EPUB size: 1794 kb | DJVU size: 1350 kb
Sub: Kids

Grade Level: 1 - 4. Series: BCCB BLUE RIBBON PICTURE BOOK AWARDS (AWARDS). One of the most exquisite examples of excellence in children's literature, The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup is a rare tale of the tensions of love and tenderness.

Grade Level: 1 - 4. Publisher: Candlewick (May 1, 2003). One person found this helpful.

The New England Reading Association has awarded her their 2016 Special Recognition Award for Outstanding Contributions to Literacy.

It's not that it was a bad story mind you, it's just that it didn't touch me like many other books have. The New England Reading Association has awarded her their 2016 Special Recognition Award for Outstanding Contributions to Literacy. Books by Terry Farish.

The Cat Who Loved Potato Soup is a book about the bond between a cat and its human, about unspoken feelings .

The Cat Who Loved Potato Soup is a book about the bond between a cat and its human, about unspoken feelings, and about a routine that mustn't be broken, one that can't be broken without a devastating hurt or perceived betrayal. After the first reading I sat there stunned by the unexpected power and impact of this little book, and loved it just as much on the second and third readings. His artwork for The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup was done in watercolor and gouache. I learned by googling that gouache is a more opaque watercolor technique with a vehicle containing more pigment.

Together Terry Farish, who generally writes for young adults, and illustrator Barry Root tell an unusual story with impressive text and terrific illustrations. This is a book any cat lover will love. And the rest of us will appreciate it, too. Continue reading Show less. Talk to your kids about. Families can talk about the relationship between the old man and his cat. Do you think they like each other? What makes you think so? Why did the old man think the cat was "nobody's prize"?

Shop with confidence. CAT WHO LIKED POTATO SOUP (BCCB BLUE RIBBON PICTURE BOOK AWARDS By Terry Mint. Mint Condition! Quick &Free Shipping.

Shop with confidence. Going North (Bccb Blue Ribbon Picture Book Awards (Awards)) Janice N. Harringto. The Dark (Bccb Blue Ribbon Picture Book Awards (Awards)) by Snicket, Lemony.

What others are saying. The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup (bccb Blue Ribbon Picture Book Awards (awards))

The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup (children's picture book), illustrated by Barry Root, Candlewick Press (Cambridge .

The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup (children's picture book), illustrated by Barry Root, Candlewick Press (Cambridge, MA), 2003. WORK IN PROGRESS: Braids, and More True Stories about Sudanese Teenagers, a nonfiction book about a group of teens living in Portland, Maine. In addition to her picture book and her novels for teen readers, Farish has also penned several fictional works for adults, among them Flower Shadows, If the Tiger, and A House in Earnest. Based on the author's own experiences in Vietnam as a war-relief worker, Flower Shadows describes the horrors faced by female Red Cross volunteers during the Vietnam War.

Root's spare, warm-hued rural scenes perfectly capture the tone of this tender tale about two curmudgeons-a grizzled "ol' .

Root's spare, warm-hued rural scenes perfectly capture the tone of this tender tale about two curmudgeons-a grizzled "ol' Texas boy, country-raised, don't you know," and a cat-sharing one roof.

Terry Farish is a writing teacher and author with a passion for telling the stories of people from many cultures. Her previous picture book, The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup, won a BCCB Blue Ribbon award. Her novel The Good Braider was named a YALSA Best Book of the Year and selected as an American Library Association Outstanding Book for the College Bound and Lifelong Learner. Her second novel, Either the Beginning or the End of the World, will be published in 2015. She lives in Kittery, ME. Ken Daley was born in Ontario to parents who emigrated from the Dominican Republic. He draws inspiration.

Erika Oller is the illustrator of several picture books by Leslea Newman and has a. .Customers who bought this item also bought. Destination, rates & speeds. 2. The Cabbage Soup Solution (BCCB Blue Ribbon Picture Book Awards (Awards)).

Erika Oller is the illustrator of several picture books by Leslea Newman and has a successful line of greeting cards. From School Library Journal: PreSchool-Grade 1-An old woman and her two cats live quietly on a small farm where she is especially good at growing cabbages. Then one day, half of her crop mysteriously disappears. Published by Dutton Juvenile (2004).

With down-home language that’s a joy to read aloud, Terry Farish tells a wry, unconventional love story about an unlikely pair of curmudgeons - brought to life in glowing illustrations by Barry Root.The cat was fond of the man’s potato soup,which made him love her a breath more,but not so’s you’d notice.There was an old man, an ol’ Texas boy, who lived on a road called Chatterpie with an uppity old cat - a cat who’d rather eat potato soup than catch blackbirds. A cat who liked to go fishing and sit on the bow of the old man’s boat, her face into the wind, like she was a hood ornament. "Fool cat," the old man would say. "You ain’t nobody’s prize." Then one day something unexpected happens, and they both learn that even the most cantankerous love can inspire acts of heroic proportions - but not, of course, so’s you’d notice.
Comments (7)
Longitude Temporary
This is a book about appreciating those you love and take for granted. It's a book about a perceived insult or hurt that wasn't meant to be such, but results in the cat (the one who perceives the insult or hurt) up and leaving. This makes the old man sad because he doesn't know why the cat left or where it went. When the cat returns, it's as wet as can be. And angry. And righteous. And it lets the old man know exactly what it thinks about being insulted. After a day of this, the relationship between the old man and his cat returns to what it had been when the book started -- except, now, the old man shows the cat how much he appreciates her.
Spilberg
I can't say enough about this book and how much my youngest daughter and I have enjoyed it. It is such a heartwarming story between a man and his cat, especially if you are a cat-lover. Teaches the true meaning of love, not only between a human and his pet(s) but between people as well.
FreandlyMan
This is a wonderful book; so good that I've bought one for myself in addition to giving them to my grandchildren. I can see why Haruki Murakami chose to translate it into Japanese.
Ballardana
My 2 year old constantly requests "soup book".
Gorisar
Not, as you may have guessed, a book in the famous "The Cat Who" series by Lillian Jackson Braun. Instead, this is a simple tale of a man and his cat. Stories of this ilk are nine times out of ten relegated to the dogs of the world. We can find a million "a man and his dog" books out there, so it is that much more impressive when the companion of the tale is a little more feline. Author Terry Farish, previously disposed to writing books for young adults, and the remarkable Barry Root have teamed together to bring us a story of good old-fashioned friendship and bonding.

The book begins, "There was an old man, an ol' Texas boy, country-raised, don't you know". He lives alone with his cat, to whom he is very attached, "but not so's you'd notice". Man and cat live a nice peaceful life. When the man goes out to fish, the cat sits on the prow of the boat, though she never catches anything. Truthfully, she's never caught a thing in her whole life, a fact that the man brings up regularly. But they share bowls of potato soup together and are quite contented with their lot. You get the distinct feeling that the man is retired and that this is how he prefers to spend his days. One day, the man finds that the cat is still sleeping when he's ready to go fishing. Not one to wait too long, he leaves without her, reasoning that he doesn't need her. When the cat wakes to find the man gone (a thing that has never occurred before) she leaves home. The man comes back to an empty home and for three days the cat does not return. One day he comes home and there's the cat on the porch, one paw on the biggest fish you ever did see. The cat howls her story, which the man picks up on pretty well, and at long last the two are back in the goods. "And he loved the sight of her, oh, and this time you'd notice". And in time the cat forgives the man and, "then came sweet peace".

There's a tone to the dialogue and text of this book that's as easy and pleasant on the ear as you could hope for in a picture book. The man, for his part, is the type to mutter words like, "Fool cat. You ain't nobody's prize. Never killed nothin'". These two could be living anywhere in the continental United States, honestly. The man's grouchy, but he's never downright mean, and the cat matches him in spirit, sticking up for herself when she needs to. Alone, the book's a great read. Paired with Root's illustrations, it's a dream come true. Barry Root has somehow captured the feel and tone of this story perfectly. From the man's small ramshackle little house (note the toilet bowl under the mailbox that reads, "Junk mail") to that baseball cap the man always wears, to the truck he drives. Heck, I even liked box of Kleenex that sits forlornly on the man's dining room table. If I have any problems with the pictures in this book, perhaps Roots didn't make the man as curmudgeonly looking as he is in the text. But this is a minor/ tiny/ petty/ miniscule complaint. The book's a fantastic looking piece of work. Though you never learn the name of either the man or the cat, you don't need to. They stand on their own well enough. And this isn't a book about some grand rich person or even a person who works in a professional manner. This is about a guy who'd like nothing better than to live on his own with his cat and to go fishing every day. Remarkably, it makes fantastic reading for the young ones.
The best way to tell if you're going to like this book or not is to just take a gander at the cover. Blow it up big so that you can get a good long look at it. If the shot of that cat (her mouth smiling and the man in the back of the boat) doesn't appeal to you then you probably won't enjoy this book. But if you like cats or men or just honest straightforward storytelling, then this is the book for you. It does not aim beyond its station, but it's a strong well-told tale that you could read again and again and get a little more out of every time. I wish that all picture books could do half as much.
Forey
This is the simple story of a old man and his old cat. Being an old man and a lover of cats, I certainly could relate to this particular story. There is a certain sadness to the book, but a happy sadness and a great ending. The author has told a simple tale that will appear to just about ever age. I read this one to the kids in my classes and they love it. The illustrations are great and fit perfectly with the text. I cannot remember when I have enjoyed reading a book to the young ones as much as I enjoyed this one. Recommend this one highly.
Terr
You don't have to be a cat owner to love this finely wrought picturebook. Farish's text uses vivid imagery to lick and scratch its way into your heart. The paintings by Barry Root are watercolor and gouache, with endpapers that wrap the book in an illustrated toasty-warm electric blanket complete with cat hairs. Over 200 children loved hearing this story read aloud, and they mentioned the pages where the cat recounts her fishing experience as the most imaginative. This sparked a delightful discussion of the stories their beloved pets might tell their owners. One of the most exquisite examples of excellence in children's literature, The Cat Who Liked Potato Soup is a rare tale of the tensions of love and tenderness.
As we all know, people do not own cats. Cats own people. And that little fact of life is described wonderfully in this tale of the aloof cat who liked potato soup and the kind, caring man who liked to fish. The illustrations and story are magnificent.