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by Michael Morpurgo

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Author: Michael Morpurgo
ISBN: 0670830224
Language: English
Pages: 144 pages
Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Publisher: Viking Juvenile; American ed. edition (April 1, 1990)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: lit doc mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1466 kb | EPUB size: 1927 kb | DJVU size: 1691 kb
Sub: Kids

Mr Nobody's Eyes book. Mr Nobody’s Eyes is a compelling animal story from Britain’s best-loved children’s author, Michael Morpurgo.

Mr Nobody's Eyes book. Harry heard the key turn in the lock. He had already made up his mind to run.

Six best-loved novels by award-winning author of 'War Horse', brought together in this ebook collection.

From the author of War Horse comes a gentle, evocative story of a young city boy’s summer in 1960s rural Provence. When Yannick learns that he is to stay with his aunt Mathilde and her family in the South of France, he cannot believe his luck. He has rarely been out of Paris, and if the paintings in his mother’s beloved Cézanne book are to be believed, surely Provence is paradise itself. Six best-loved novels by award-winning author of 'War Horse', brought together in this ebook collection. A perfect introduction to Michael Morpurgo's enthralling storytelling for new readers and a classic collection for fans.

Michael Morpurgo Newsletter.

It is war-time and Harry is in trouble at school, and he doesn’?™t like his stepfather or the new baby. Michael Morpurgo Newsletter.

Mr Nobody’s Eyes is a compelling animal story from Britain’s best-loved children’s author, Michael Morpurgo

Mr Nobody’s Eyes is a compelling animal story from Britain’s best-loved children’s author, Michael Morpurgo. Former Children’s Laureate and award-winning author of War Horse, Michael Morpurgo, demonstrates why he is considered to be the master story teller with this story of a one boy and his bond with mankind’s closest relative.

Narrated by Gareth Cassidy. Things have been difficult for Harry since his mother remarried

Narrated by Gareth Cassidy. Things have been difficult for Harry since his mother remarried. With a new baby at home, and only trouble at school, life is u.

Mr Nobody's Eyes Paperback – 4 September 2006. by Michael Morpurgo (Author). He has written more than a hundred books, including the global hit War Horse, which was made into a Hollywood film by Steven Spielberg in 2011. He has won the Whitbread Award, the Smarties Award, the Circle of Gold Award, the Children's Book Award and has been short-listed for the Carnegie Medal four times.

by. Morpurgo, Michael. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

51% off. Mr Nobody's Eyes. By (author) Michael Morpurgo. Free delivery worldwide. Michael Morpurgo has written more than a hundred books and won the Whitbread Award, the Smarties Award, the Circle of Gold Award, the Children's Book Award and has been short-listed for the Carnegie Medal four times.

Mr Nobody’s Eyes Audible Audiobook – Unabridged. Listen to this book for FREE when you try Audible. Michael Morpurgo (Author), Gareth Cassidy (Narrator), HarperCollins Publishers Limited (Publisher) & 0 more.

Michael Morpurgo Former Children's Laureate Michael Morpurgo needs no introduction. He is one of the most successful children's authors in the country, loved by children, teachers and parents alike. Michael has written more than forty books for children including the global hit War Horse, which was made into a Hollywood film by Steven Spielberg in 2011. Several of his other stories have been adapted for screen and stage, including My Friend Walter, Why the Whales Came and Kensuke's Kingdom

Follows the adventures of an extraordinary pair on the run: an escaped circus monkey and an ostracized young English boy named Harry
Comments (7)
Pumpit
In the tradition begun by Black Beauty, the hero and narrator of this story is a horse. He cares about horse things: water, grass, doing his work well, and a kind master to work for.

He does not know what the different colored uniforms mean; he does not care if the person he is working for speaks English, French or German. He does not understand the forces in the human world that compel men to fight and kill one another.

This is the story of Joey, a Thoroughbred/draft horse cross who began life working for the son of a British farmer. Young Albert copes with his difficult and drunken father by training the young horse that his father bought at auction to spite a neighbor. Under Albert's loving tutelage, Joey learns to carry a rider and pull a plow.

But when war comes, Albert's father needs the money so Joey is sold to the army. And so begins the adventure of a lifetime for Joey. That first separation from Albert is the harbinger of many partings: the fortunes and misfortunes of war sweep Joey helplessly along. He's a horse caught in a world where machines are replacing horses and bringing new horrors and perils into the world. But while cavalry charges become discredited, horses are still needed to pull the big guns, the supply wagons and the ambulances. Machines can't cope with the mud and primitive roads of the era. Horses are also still needed by farmers.

Joey's story brings to life the hardship and suffering of the estimated six million horses that were pressed into service during World War I. It's a powerful, gut wrenching story because most of those horses never made it back to their original homes.

Some people would consider WAR HORSE by Michael Morpurgo to be an anti-war story. However, I found this story to be uplifting--Joey, despite all he suffers, retains his trust and love for human beings. He doesn't understand the war or any of the causes of his suffering, but he responds to the people who treat him kindly with love and loyalty. And he meets with many people who do their best to ease his suffering and to take care of him. In humanity and horsemanship, the world is redeemed. This is a wonderful story. Highly recommended. Soon to be a motion picture directed by Steven Spielberg.
Kazigrel
This has been an interesting day in that I saw the preview for the film, 'War Horse', and being so moved by that, I had to read the book. I downloaded it to my iPad and proceeded to read it in one sitting, taking time out only to eat dinner. I will not go into a lengthy review, as there are plenty of good reviews of that type already available. I will say that this book has moved me in ways that quite possibly no other book has managed previously. 'War Horse' achieves four things for me, and achieves them in a most brilliant fashion: 1) It is extremely well-written (there is something about the style that reminds me of my favourite author, Hermann Hesse), contains outstanding character development, and seamlessly incorporates the other three achievements to which I refer; 2) It speaks of the futility and madness of war, several times bringing to mind scenes from 'All Quiet on the Western Front' (1930); 3) It deals with horses, and while containing some elements that were difficult to read due to my all too visual mind, it is realistic yet hopeful and inspiring; 4) It is set during an historical event and is believable in its settings. I experienced every emotion while reading this, and became attached to its characters, as though they were old friends. There's not much more you can ask for from a book than that. I have a distinct feeling that this was only the first time I will have read 'War Horse', as I suspect I will revisit Joey, Albert, Topthorn and the others many more times.
Taulkree
[Comments refer to the stage play "War Horse" by Nick Stafford, which is based on the novel of the same name by Michael Morpurgo]

"War Horse" is pure story-telling, a classic tale for children but, hey, it's going to cause any adult to choke up with emotion. Think "Old Yeller," by Fred Gipson, or Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' "The Yearling."

The stage play by Nick Stafford tells the story of Joey, a horse -- half thoroughbred, half hunter -- born shortly before the outbreak of WWI, separated from his mother while still a foal, raised in the Devon countryside in England by young Albert Narracott and sold to the English cavalry to fight alongside the doughboys in France.

Saying good-bye to his beloved horse, Albert vows: "I want you to do yourself proud. You go and drive those Germans back home, and then you come home. I promise you, Joey, that we shall be together again . . . I, Albert Narracott, do solemnly swear that we shall be together again."

Although too young to enlist, Albert, 16, lies about his age and sets out to find Joey and bring the horse home to the fields of Devon.

A caveat: This paperback by Nick Stafford is the stage adaptation of the novel of the same name by Michael Morpurgo. The National Theatre in London gave the play its premier in 2007. The same production, in association with the Handspring Puppet Company, is scheduled to open at Lincoln Center in New York in the spring of 2011. Steven Spielberg is directing a movie of the book which is scheduled to premier December 2011.

With that caveat in mind, for me the question then becomes does it make sense to read the play before seeing the "War Horse" stage production or before sitting down in a dark movie theater with a box of popcorn and watching the action unfold on the big screen.

By reading the play beforehand, you'll know the story and how it ends. But it's a fantastically compelling story that has traction enough to be retold and retold without diminishing its emotional wallop.

The value of reading the play before seeing the production is that you create Joey and his world in your imagination. Seeing what you've conjured in your mind's eye and how that compares to what happens on stage or in the movie theater is, for me at least, a pleasure all in its own right. Think of reading "Lord of the Rings" and then seeing the trilogy on screen. Reading "Gone With the Wind" before watching the classic movie.

For me, reading the play or book first; seeing the movie after, enriches the entire experience. My advice, get to know Joey and his story as soon as you can; then make plans to see the play and go to the movie.

[4.5 stars]