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by Ana Juan

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Author: Ana Juan
ISBN: 0439488915
Language: English
Pages: 40 pages
Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books (October 1, 2004)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lit mobi azw txt
FB2 size: 1452 kb | EPUB size: 1923 kb | DJVU size: 1552 kb
Sub: Kids

The illustrator of the highly acclaimed FRIDA makes a smashing debut as an author. PreSchool-Grade 2 - The Night Eater follows the moon at "the edge of every day," consuming the darkness

The illustrator of the highly acclaimed FRIDA makes a smashing debut as an author. PreSchool-Grade 2 - The Night Eater follows the moon at "the edge of every day," consuming the darkness. He is a cheerful, cherubic creature, sporting a sleeping cap and a tied-on nose folded out of red construction paper. With a gleam in his eyes, he gobbles up "every kind of night: cloudy nights as light and sweet as cotton candy and deep black nights that tasted like bitter chocolate.

Ezra Jack Keats Award. Meet the 2019 Winners. Writer John Sullivan. Kitten and the Night Watchman. Illustrator Oge Mora. Thank you, Omu! 2019 Honor Books. More about the EJK Award winners and Honor Books. 30+ years of great children’s books.

Ezra Jack Keats (March 11, 1916 – May 6, 1983) was an American writer and illustrator of children's books. Keats wrote A Letter to Amy and Hi, Cat! but he was most famous for The Snowy Day. It is considered one of the most important American books of the 20th century. Keats is best known for introducing multiculturalism into mainstream American children's literature

Every morning the Night Eater runs through the sky, gobbling up all the darkness.

Every morning the Night Eater runs through the sky, gobbling up all the darkness. He eats cloudy nights as light and sweet as cotton candy, and deep dark nights that taste like bitter chocolate.

Each year, new writers and illustrators are celebrated by the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation in partnership with the de. .

Each year, new writers and illustrators are celebrated by the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation in partnership with the de Grummond Children’s Literature Collection at The University of Southern Mississippi. The winners of the 30th annual Ezra Jack Keats Book Award include College of the Atlantic 2006 alumnus Ryan Higgins. Higgins’ Mother Bruce (Published by Disney, Hyperion) is one of two books to receive honorable mention for illustration. We are proud to present the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award to the best new talents in children’s illustrated literature each year.

The Night Eater by. Ana Juan. Ezra Jack Keats Book Award for New Illustrator (2005).

Destination, rates & speeds. 5. the night eater (ezra jack keats. Juan, Ana. ISBN 10: 0439488915 ISBN 13: 9780439488914.

The Ezra Jack Keats Book Award is an annual . At the Ezra Jack Keats Book Awards Ceremony every April, the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation presents the New Writer Award (since 1985) and New Illustrator Award (since 2001) to an author and an illustrator who are at an early stage of their career. An Honor Books category was added in 2012. The nonprofit Ezra Jack Keats Foundation was established in 1964 in Brooklyn, New York by author and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats.

Based on the award-winning book by Ezra Jack Keats. A new exhibit at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art Now & Then: Contemporary Illustrators and their Childhood Art pairs childhood drawings with the adult work of children’s book. Peter goes on a magical, snowy walk to his Nana's house to bring home their Christmas Eve dinner. Watch The Snowy Day Season 1 - Prime Video. Based on the award-winning book by Ezra Jack Keats. A new exhibit at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art Now & Then: Contemporary Illustrators and their Childhood Art pairs childhood drawings with the adult work of children’s book Several winners and honorees are featured in the exhibit including: Oge Mora, Shadra Strickland, Don Tate (author-illustrator), Juana Martinez-Neal - Author Illustrator, and Evan Turk.

For You Are a Kenyan Child (Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award)/Kelly Cunnane. The Night Eater by Ana Juan

For You Are a Kenyan Child (Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award)/Kelly Cunnane. For You Are a Kenyan Child by Kelly Cunnane - Imagine you live in a small Kenyan village, where the sun rises over tall trees filled with doves. The Night Eater by Ana Juan. In The Night Eater, her artwork is. Level your classroom library or find books at just the right level for students with Book Wizard, the book finder from Scholastic with Guided Reading, Lexile® Measure, an. Ana Juan's "The Night Eater". Film Festival Poster.

The illustrator of the highly acclaimed FRIDA makes a smashing debut as an author.Every morning the Night Eater runs through the sky, gobbling up all the darkness. He eats cloudy nights as light and sweet as cotton candy, and deep dark nights that taste like bitter chocolate. His favorites are bright clear nights -- the stars tickle his nose as he swallows! But what if the Night Eater doesn't come? Without him to devour the dark, the night animals won't go back to their dens . . . the earth and all the people grow very pale and cold . . . and children everywhere long to play in the sun. Can they convince the Night Eater to return to the skies?
Comments (7)
Tto
I purchased this book not only out of a desire to check out more Ana Juan and add a picture book by a leading Hispanic author-illustrator to my Spanish classroom, but because the cover illustration was so fantastically and creepily alluring. After having read the book with a number of children, I highly recommend it, for Juan's breathtakingly beautiful and dreamy artwork if nothing else. But the story is entertaining and endearing in its own right, following the trials and tribulations of the title character, whose daily duties eating up the stars and darkness in order to make way for the day leave him embarrassingly overweight and ashamed. He makes a decision to suspend his night-eating, which leads to all sorts of unwanted outcomes.
Daron
l love this book for night time reading. My daughter and son loved it and still do (11yrs and 7yrs). The illustrations are so imaginitive and whimsical. I bought this book for my artist friend and she loved it!
luisRED
Beautiful illustrations. 5 year old loves story.
Phain
This book is worth getting for the illustrations alone, round and clear and huggable. But as it happens, I like the story too and the image it creates of a being (you see him there!) that runs around gobbling up night so we can have day. It's such a fanciful idea, I just love it.
Dead Samurai
Love this book. My grandson and I found it at the library and he wanted to read it all the time! It's our book! He only wants me to read it. It's so descriptive and the illustrations are a perfect compliment to the words.
Goll
My son (who is 3) LOVES this book. It is so beautifully illustrated. It is written like a song. I enjoy reading this over and over again for my little boy (and me!)
Gio
I review so many picture books for children that after a while it becomes difficult to separate the books that I think are "good" from those that I think are "spectacular". I tend to gush over good books. I'm a gusher. But once in a while I hit upon a book, author, or illustrator that is so original and engaging that it is all I can do not to sing their praises in a never ending burst of la-la-las. Ana Juan is one such artist. I'd loved her picture book biography of Friday Kahlo ("Frida" by Jonah Winter) and her illustrations for "Elena's Serenade" by Campbell Geeslin were awe-inspiring. Still, nothing completely worked perfectly well until Ms. Juan came out with "The Night Eater". A kind of commedia dell-arte for the kiddies (complete with a "Harlequin"-like protagonist) the story is a sweet little fable with pictures so jaw-droppingly engaging that I've had hard-core teenagers cooing over the colors. And what greater enticement can I give you than that, I might ask?

The story stars a plump little long-eyelashed fellow eternally clothed in soft pink long-johns, a matching pink nightcap with an iridescent light at its tip, and a red pointed nose that ties nicely onto his face. This would be The Night Eater, and his job is to munch and devour the night-time so that the day can dawn everywhere. Wherever the Night Eater runs (and one assumes that he runs eastwards) that is where the sun comes up. One day though it becomes clear that The Night Eater has eaten so much night that the buttons on his long-johns are fit to burst. The moon mocks his plump status and in a huff our hero refuses to eat any more night. Initially the perpetual darkness amuses the people of the world and they explore the "nocturnal animals and perfumed flowers, whose petals opened only at night". However, a little darkness goes a long way and when the children complain to the Night Eater, he accidentally chews on a bit of star and before you know it he's forgotten why he stopped eating the night in the first place. So the daylight comes back, the world is back to normal, and the Night Eater makes sure to place a little piece of night in his hat, so that he might always remember its sweetness.

Cute enough story. It sort of has the feel of promising children that no matter how dark the night is, there's an adorable little flouncy-trouncy fellow out there who's more than willing to gobble up the darkness. Ms. Juan, a native of Spain, wrote this book herself and her voice shines through with the utmost clarity. That is not why you should buy it though. You should buy it because with this title Ms. Juan has pulled out all the stops and has let her acrylics go absolutely wild. The book is a visual bombshell. You get a small hint of this when you look at the cover and title page, but about the time The Night Eater has skipped past a vibrant green mermaid brushing out her hair, you're hooked. The story almost feels like Juan's gentlest ode to Federico Fellini. In one instance the sun is given the pleasure of saying "Good morning" to everyone. In this shot a babushka, a hat-wearing rabbit, a nun with a birdcage (or possibly just a woman in white), a penguin in a top hat covered in streamers and confetti, a pajama wearing man in a nightcap, a pig, a chicken who has just laid an egg, a 1955 Italian businessman late for work, and a small child with a bowl of porridge all stand in line to say hello to a beaming smiling sun. The sun tips the point of its nose to that of the child with the porridge and the image is so sweet and yet also so stunning that you're left hungry for more. This is a world where animals and children interact constantly. Playing constantly with light, you can see Juan's Picasso and Frida Kahlo influences shining through. The book is a carnival of deepening shades and remarkable tones. Prettiest darned book I ever had the pleasure to own.

Now here's the kicker. Kids will like this book too. I sometimes go on and on about how pretty a book is and completely ignore whether or not children will actually enjoy the story. In this case they'll be just as happy with the tale and mesmerized by the pictures as their adult contemporaries. How could they not be? It's funny and a true treasure on a shelf. I'm not a gambling man by nature (I'm not a man at all, come to think of it) but I'd wager good money that years and years from now copies of "The Night Eater" will still be found in countless homes, libraries, and personal memories.

After some quick on-line research (which is to say, I went to Ms. Juan's website) I determined that she has lots of children's books out there that have not yet been translated into English and offered to the American public. This is a shame and a bother. I call upon every available American publisher to go out there, get her permission, and crank out as many Juan illustrated puppies as they can get their hands onto. She's a treasure, this woman, and "The Night Eater" is one of her loveliest creations. If you cannot for the life of you figure out what to get your niece, nephew, grandchild, or offspring of your former college roommate, this would be your best bet. I love Ana Juan.
The Night Eater has a very important job. He goes around every night snacking on the starts to make room for his friend the sun. Things are good until one day the moon makes the comment that the Night eater is getting a little too large!! This hurts his feelings and so he stops eating the night time stars. Will things ever be the same? What will happen if there is no room in sky for the sun? Read The Night Eater to find out!

.The book had an interesting story line. The illustrations were whimsical and fun to look at.

I would recommend this book. My family and I read it together as a bedtime tale. All members of the family, from my little sister to my grandparents enjoyed the short story.